“Working together to encourage equity through literacy communities: a challenge of the 21st Century”

FULL CONFERENCE PROGRAMME

Download the programme here

MONDAY, 3 JULY

Location: Grand Amphitheater “Ramón y Cajal”, Faculty of Medicine – University Complutense of Madrid

Location: First floor – Faculty of Medicine, Complutense University of Madrid (Campus – University city of Madrid. Subway: “Ciudad Universitaria” station)

The first day´s sessions are plenary sessions for all attendees (European Conference and Ibero-American Forum). Therefore, simultaneous interpretation into English and/or Spanish will be available, depending on the language used in each case, throughout the day.

Las distintas sesiones que se desarrollan el primer día de estos eventos (lunes 3/7) son plenarias para todos los asistentes, tanto del Foro Iberoamericano como de European Conference). De modo que, se contará con interpretación simultánea al inglés y/o al español, según la lengua que se utilice en cada sesión, durante toda la jornada.

 CF  Plenary session – 20th European Conference / 6º Iberoamerican Forum (Monday, 3 July from 10.00 a.m. to 8.30 p.m.)

Welcome greeting


MARÍA JOSÉ FERNÁNDEZ DÍAZ, Dean of University Complutense of Madrid

ESTELA D’ANGELO MENÉNDEZ, President AELE, Spanish Reading and Writing Association

Official inauguration


20th European Conference on Literacy

  • RENATE VALTIN, Chairperson IDEC, European Committee of the International Literacy Association
  • ANN-SOFIE SELIN, Chairperson FELA, Federation of European Literacy Associations
  • ESTELA D’ANGELO MENÉNDEZ, President AELE, Spanish Reading and Writing Association

6º Foro Iberoamericano sobre Literacidad y Aprendizaje

  • SOLEDAD MONZÓN CABRERA, Councillor of “Educación y Universidades del Gobierno de Canarias” (SPAIN)
  • JAVIER PALOP SANCHO, Director of “Fundación SM”
  • FRANCISCA IZABEL PEREIRA MACIEL, member of CEALE, “Centro de Alfabetização, Leitura e Escrita”
  • MARÍA SAINZ MARTÍN, AELE Vice-chair, Spanish Reading and Writing Association

Authorities presiding over this inauguration ceremony:  

Authorities of the city of Madrid / Autoridades de la ciudad de Madrid

PAULO SPELLER, Secretary General of the OEI, “Organización de Estados Iberoamericanos”

Introduce: MARÍA TERESA ACOSTA TEJERA, Director of “Agencia Canaria de Calidad Universitaria y Evaluación Educativa de la Consejería de Educación-Gobierno de Canarias” (SPAIN) 

ILA Vice President Douglas Fisher and IDEC Chairperson Renate Valtin present The award to Croatian Prison Reading Program for detainees and their children.

Kristina Čunović and Snježana Berak, from CroRA, Croatian Reading Association, recive this award.


Language: English and Spanish

Simultaneous language interpretation: Spanish and English

 

 

Once the Official Inauguration is over, the  Academic Program stars. This transition is accompanied by Music and twitter performance of the piece of W. Shakespeare Romeo and Juliet: #TuiteoYJulieta performed by students from “Centro Público Integrado de Enseñanzas Musicales Federico Moreno Torroba, Madrid (SPAIN)

Introduce: GABRIEL RUSINEK, University Complutense of Madrid

 


Language: English and Spanish

Simultaneous language interpretation: Spanish and English

 

What do we speak when we talk about reading?

MARTHA R. VILLABONA GARCÍA, Tecnical Advisor of the Multiple Literacies Project, Center for Innovation and Educational Research

PILAR GARCÍA FREIRE, Head of the Digital Educational Resources Area, National Institute of Technologies and Teacher Training

SUSANA ALEGRE LANDABURU, Head of the Coordination and Cooperation Area, General Subdirectorate for Library Coordination,

CRISTINA ALARCÓ UBACH, Head of the Reading Promotion Service, General Subdirectorate for the Promotion of Book, Reading and Spanish Literature

MARÍA JESÚS CABAÑAS MARTÍNEZ, Educational Adviser of the National Institute of Educational Evaluation

 The session is moderated by CONCHA VILARIÑO PERIÁÑEZ, Head of General Subdirectorate for Library Coordination

 Language: Spanish

Simultaneous language interpretation: English


  • Language: Spanish
  • Simultaneous language interpretation: English

The general objective of this table is to address the actions of the Ministry of Education, Culture and Sport (MECD) related to reading and writing. According to the competencies of each unit, the actions are diverse but all are aimed to the creation and consolidation of the reading habit and the improvement of reading competence. Actions carried out in the school, family and social environment by different MECD bodies, such as the General Subdirectorate for the Promotion of Book, Reading and Spanish Literature, the General Subdirectorate for Library Coordination, the National Institute of Technologies and Teacher Training, the National Institute of Educational Evaluation and the National Center for Innovation and Educational Research will be made known.

 

MARIE BONNAFÉ, President ACCES, Actions Culturelles Contre les Exclusions et les Ségrégations (FRANCE)

Baby, books and libraries

In this presentation recent works will be comment to underline the universal role of beauty in the child construction of these early relationships.

Projects focused on books and babies together with their families have been developed widely in France since 1980 in the context of libraries, expanding internationally in the 1990s. From the Cultural Actions Against Exclusions and Segregations ( ACCES) we have prioritized this type of projects aimed at the “furthest away from the book” public. Precisely, the Ministry of Culture of the French Government reinforced these dynamics through the National Project «First pages».

It is universal to note that, during their earliest years, the younger ones are interested in albums. Also, in children’s songs, nursery rhymes and also by the iconic collection that are transmitted through oral stories. After almost forty years implementing such projects, we see that the aesthetic dimension occupies an important place in childhood before the age of 6 (whether or not their relatives are readers). That is, the vast majority of babies are active in choosing the album that most interests them and spontaneously they prefer the most beautiful. This is not the case in older children and have not been initiated in access to books at an early stage. The early interest shown by babies around the world has been evoked through games with written language (through observation). In this presentation recent works will be comment to underline the universal role of beauty in the child construction of these early relationships.

Introduce the guest speaker: PATRICIA SCHILLINGS, University of Liège (BELGIUM)


  • Language: French
  • Simultaneous language interpretation: English y Spanish

Culturae, languaje and diversity: inclusive and sustainable public policies

Discussants:

  • CARLOS AUGUSTO ABICALILDirector General de Educación, Ciencia y Cultura de la Secretaría General de la Organización de Estados Iberoamericanos” (OEI)
  • TERESA CALÇADA, Commissioner “Plan Nacional de Lectura” (PORTUGAL)
  • JOSÉ CASTILHO MARQUES, ConsultantGestão&Projetos Livro-Leitura-Biblioteca” (BRAZIL)
  • ALEJANDRO TIANA FERRER, Rector of UNED, National University of Distance Education (SPAIN)

The sesión is moderated by INÉS MIRET, “Laboratorio Emilia de Formación”, Neturity (SPAIN)


  • Language: Spanish
  • Simultaneous language interpretation: English

The table opens a dialogue between voices of diverse origins around a common concern: the challenges in this matter taking into consideration diversity and inequality, how should we understand both terms in contemporary society and which are (must be) the commitments of the public policy. A balance, proposals and a critical discussion will be the axes of this panel.

 

2.15 p.m. Lunch Break


  • Language: EnglishSpanish
  • Simultaneous language interpretation: Spanish / English

Read more about sobre Daniel Cassany

DANIEL CASSANY, Professor and researcher, “Universitat Pompeu Fabra” (SPAIN)

Young netizens: what they learn online and its connection with the school

From in-depth interviews with Spanish high school students and the follow-up of their publications and interaction on the net with virtual ethnography, we describe and analyze their most frequent leisure activities (social networks, video games, photography, video channels). These are multimodal, collaborative, multilingual and intercultural vernacular activities, which facilitate the learning of particular knowledge and skills, different from those learned in the classroom and in the curriculum (access to world audiences, linguistic and cultural diversity, geography and time differences, sophisticated software, etc.). Thereby these adolescents construct new and different identities and representations of the world. From these data we will critically review some of the approaches to the teaching reading and writing in the Internet age.

Presentation: BELÉN SÁENZ-RICO DE SANTIAGO, University Complutense of Madrid (SPAIN)


  • Language: English
  • Simultaneous language interpretation: Spanish

Literacy as part of the new 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development: How relevant to Europe?

RENATE VALTIN, Vice President FELA, member of EU High Level Group, 2011-12.

GERRY SHIEL, Educational Research Centre, St Patrick’s College, Dublin (IRLAND)

The sesión is moderated by: FELA (Ann-Sofie Selin), GAL (Carolina Belalcazar, UNESCO-UIL)

Language: English

Simultaneous language interpretation: Spanish


The panel aims to address the extent to which literacy contributes to advance the various Sustainable Development Goals of the new 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development in Europe. This implies reviewing the trends and status of literacy/numeracy at regional and national levels in Europe (both Western and Eastern Europe). This will set the background to explore how development sectors (e.g. health, education, labour) benefit or not from literacy advancements to improve the well-being of their populations or societies in terms of better and equal employment opportunities, better health, and quality lifelong learning for youth and adults. Of interest is to pinpoint, as possible, the ongoing unequal development opportunities linked to poor or stagnant literacy rates within the region and within countries.

6.15 p.m. Coffee Break / Performance

Read more about Anne Ruggles Gere

ANNE RUGGLES GERE, Professor and researcher, University of Michigan (USA)

Reading AND Writing: full Literacy

This talk will consider various views of the concept of literacy, noting how they have changed with time and circumstance. In particular, it will focus on the need for a capacious definition of literacy, one that includes both the reception and production of texts (both reading and writing) for full literacy. This full literacy takes on special importance in a time when various authoritarian forces—ranging from standardized tests imposed on school children to governments that seek to limit expression of opposing viewpoints—appear to be in ascendance. As the conference theme suggests, literacy, when practiced in community can foster equity.

Introduce the guest speaker:

  • ALMA CECILIA CARRASCO ALTAMIRANO, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla (MEXICO)

  • Language: English
  • Traducción a: Spanish

Read more about Delia Lerner

DELIA LERNER, Professor and researcher, Universidad de Buenos Aires (ARGENTINA)

Research in educational field and teaching training at reading and writing topics

Can educational research nourish teacher training processes? In what sense? Under what conditions? What kind of knowledge is possible to produce when analyzing and comparing different training paths? What agreements are created between researchers and teachers when studying the development of teaching projects in the classroom? How do these agreements evolve as research progresses? In addressing such questions​,​ in the light of experiences and inquiries carried out in several Latin American countries, general criteria that ha​s​ proven to be productive in the framework of teacher training processes will be highlighted, as well as tensions that cross them –​specifically​ when it ​aims​ to transform teaching practices-. Likewise, we will ​show​ the challenges ​faced by didactic research, in particular that of constructing interpretations shared by all participants ​regarding​ development in classroom teaching projects.

Introduce the guest speaker: ESTELA D’ANGELO MENÉNDEZ, University Complutense of Madrid (SPAIN)


  • Language: Spanish
  • Simultaneous language interpretation: English

“La música en las palabras”

Musical performance by: “Laúdes Españoles Gaspar Sanz” Chamber ensemble 


  • Language: Spanish
  • Simultaneous language interpretation: English

 

JUANA PORTUGAL PARDO, Spanish Reading and Writing Association

OLIVER BECHARA O’HARE, University Complutense of Madrid

TUESDAY, 4 JULY

Location: Faculty of Education – University Complutense of Madrid

The sessions of Tuesday 4, Wednesday 5 and Thursday 6 of July are developed in the Faculty of Education of the Complutense University of Madrid (calle Rector Royo Villanova, s/n. Ciudad Universitaria. Subway: Metropolitano station)

C Parallel sessions (Tuesday, 4 July from – 9.00 a.m. to 10.00 a.m.): MEETING WITH SPECIAL RAPPORTEURS 

Read more about Plácido Bazo Martínez

Special Rapporteur: PLÁCIDO BAZO MARTÍNEZ, University of La Laguna (SPAIN) 

Competency based learning for young readers and writers in L1 and L2

Competency based learning is a very important tool in the development of young readers and writers both in their native language and in the second language they are learning. It needs to be done through authentic tasks where they participate in order to construct their reading and writing abilities. We suggest we do it in relation with the XXI century skills: creativity, ICT and life and career skills. We also think it is important to relate their reading and writing tasks to autonomous learning and key competences: competent readers and writers must use their autonomy and entrepreneur skills that they will develop along their lives.

Presentation: MARTA GONZÁLEZ, AELE Team


  • Location: Aula 2531 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)
  • Language: English

Read more about Douglas Fisher

Special Rapporteur: DOUGLAS FISHER, San Diego State University (USA) 

Visible Learning for Literacy
Educators have been in search of “what works” for decades. Our collective search for better ways to reach students and ensure that they develop knowledge and skills has resulted in thousands and thousands of books, hundreds of thousands of research articles, and countless websites. The truth is, not everything works. Only a few things work at ensuring that students gain a full year’s worth of growth for a year of enrollment in school, and we think it’s time we focused on what works, what doesn’t work, and what can’t hurt. And we’ve turned to Visible Learning (Hattie, 2009) for help.  As he noted, students must develop surface-level learning if they are ever going to go deep. And we know that deep learning can facilitate transfer, which has been a goal shared by educators for as long as there have been teachers. In this interactive session, we focus on specific approaches that work at the surface level of learning and note that they are different from strategies that work at the deep and transfer levels.  Importantly, we will clarify which approaches work at which phase of learning.

Presentation: ESTELA D’ANGELO MENÉNDEZ, University Complutense of Madrid


  • Location: Aula 2532 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)
  • Language: English

Read more about Fanuel Hanán Díaz

Special Rapporteur: FANUEL HANÁN DÍAZ, critic and literary researcher  (VENEZUELA) 

Magic Realism in Latin American children’s literature

Much of Latin American literature has been identified with an outstanding trend that has its most remote origins in the early decades of the twentieth century. Magical realism is a powerful current that fuses a particular view of the world with particular subjects of Latin American reality . From the 70s of XX century Latin American literature and magical realism hatches and surprises with its unexpected mix of superstition and beauty, for its supernatural approach and the development of different narrative techniques, especially the temporal distortions . Distant precedents as chroniclers of the Indies expose a trend that remained underground, where the real facts exposed such a way that they recover a fantastic value and, in another direction, surprising events are assumed to be part of a reality that absorbs the extraordinary as everyday life. However, children’s literature does not echoes this trend immediately, neither incorporatesit  irrefutably in his territory, which in itself the fantastic and the real have a long relationship. How magical realism in Latin American children’s literature is then manifested ? What are the features that identify this trend in writing for children ? Based on a review of the origins of this literature and subsequent discussions that have arisen around this category, this article presents an analysis of different children’s works involved in this stream , in order to expose the forms that asumes magical realism in childre´n discourse and the contributions that this literature makes to enrich a particular worldview with high cultural value on our continent. Analizing books by different authors and countries, will allow a review of the development of a literary trend and its distinctive features, but also will raise reflections about communicating vessels between adult literature and children’s books, as well as the literary forms that acquire these molds in the territory of childhood and the production context in which contemporary child discourse is constructed.

Presentation: ELENA BERMEJO GONZÁLEZ, University Complutense of Madrid (SPAIN)


  • Location: Aula 2533 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)
  • Language: English 

Special Raporteur: MARÍA DOLORES PÉREZ MURILLO, University Complutense of Madrid (SPAIN) 

Read more about M. Dolores Pérez Murillo

Talking around texts in two bi/multilingual educational contexts

This paper draws on data from two different longitudinal ethnographic studies that deal with the literacy practices, in formal settings, of children from Spanish-speaking diaspora families. My focus is on classroom processes and, in particular, on talk around texts. In the first study, the participants are a group of pupils aged 14 attending a Spanish maintenance school in London. In the second, a group of 6-8-year-old pupils in a Spanish complementary class in Tokyo. Then, some conclusions will be drawn about the challenges of learning to read and write in different social, cultural and historical contexts.

Presentation: IVAN GARCÍA NUÑEZ, University Complutense of Madrid


  • Location: Aula 2534 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)
  • Language: English

Read more about Shamala Ramakresinin

Special Rapporteur: SHAMALA RAMAKRESININ, Nanyang Technological Nniversity (SINGAPORE)

The role of school in building a community of readers

To understand schools’ role in shaping students to become leisure readers, the following areas were investigated in this research: availability of resources for reading, teacher’s role in promoting leisure reading and participants’ perceptions towards leisure reading. Findings revealed resource-rich school environments require enthusiastic, teacher models to foster reading among students.

Presentation: JOANA MONTES JUÁREZ, docente (SPAIN)

Location: Aula 3401 (third floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)

Language: English

Read more about Anne-Sofie Selin

Special Rapporteur: ANN-SOFIE SELIN, Finnish Reading Association (FINLAND)

Prevention and support for all learners

The Finnish Education system is comprehensive, non-selective, based on central guidelines and goals, implemented locally with room for innovation. All pupils 7 to 16 of age have the right to individualised basic education and learning. The presentation will describe and discuss three Characteristics of a good school: 1.Focus on the beginners by early intervention and individual approach support all learners. The systematic screening of all first grade pupils is based on Lundberg et al (2003). 2. Including all pupils avoids stigmatising and catches at-risk pupils by systematic screening in grades 1‒6 based on Hoover and Gough (1990); the results are assessed and translated into classroom practice. 3. Collaboration of all teachers provides support for each learner, and provides teachers with in-depth knowledge of their pupils. Collaboration shows parents the strengths of their child and gives suggestions for support. The system supports professional development and school development. The presentation shows ways of screening and assessment in Cygnaeus elementary school, Turku/Åbo that provides every pupil with General support and part-time special education for all, and intensified or special support as needed and described in the Finnish Basic Education Act.

Presentation: TAMARA MORATO MORATILLA (SPAIN)


  • Location: Aula 3201 (third floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)
  • Language: English

Read more about Ariana-Stanca Vacaretu

Special Raporteur: ARIANA-STANCA VACARETU, Romanian Reading and Writing for Critical Thinking Association (ROMANIA) 

Fostering disciplinary literacy in secondary education

Classroom teachers in secondary schools often find it difficult to infuse literacy teaching into content-area curricula (O’Brien, Moje, & Stewart, 2001). Explanations for the difficulty include institutional constraints on time, secondary teachers’ limited knowledge of literacy processes and literacy teaching practices, and teachers’ resistance to envisioning literacy as part of learning in their subject/ discipline (O’Brien, Stewart, & Moje, 1995). We will share the Romanian Reading and Writing for Critical Thinking Association’s work in the area of disciplinary literacy insofar as professional development for secondary teachers are concerned. We will address the disciplinary literacy curriculum and practices in continuing teacher education for secondary teachers of various disciplines (e.g. geography, mathematics, physics). In addition, with participants’ support, we will look at what potentialities and opportunities there are currently for promoting the concept of disciplinary literacy and disciplinary literacy practices within in-service teacher education institutions and organizations in Romania and other European countries.

Presentation: ROXANA GHERGHE


  • Location: Aula 3202 (third floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)
  • Language: English

Read more about Jochen Weber

Special Rapporteur: JOCHEN WEBER, Internationale Jugendbibliothek (GERMANY)  

Current political issues in European and Iberoamerican children’s literature
Europe is facing numerous political, economic, social and cultural challenges. Current issues, such as the financial crisis, migration, the integration of refugees, multiculturalism, cultural identity or xenophobia, which have been dominating the public debate for several years, have been reflected in a growing number of books for children and young adults. This paper presents a selection of recently published books coming from different European countries, for the most part addressed to adolescent readers. They prove that there is a wide range of both topics and narrative forms to approach those topics. The last part of the paper takes a look at the recent children’s book production in Ibero-America.

Presentation: TERESA TELLECHEA MORA, Fundación SM


  • Location: Aula 3301 (third floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)
  • Language: English

C Parallel sessions (Tuesday, 4 July – from 10.00 a.m. to 11.30 a.m.): WORKSHOPS

Rapporteurs at thworkshop:

  • LORY HAAS
  • CORINNA VILLAR
  • VICKIE MITCHELL

Sam Houston State University (USA)

Presentation: AELE Team

Language: English

Location: Aula 2531 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)


Literacy begins with communication and research tells us that oral language develops in a social context; therefore, a child must be included in talk, not merely surrounded by it. The social setting of reading promotes meaningful discussions between children and parents, children and teachers, and children with other children. Society is dominated by visual literacy—television, computers, video games, etc. Therefore, wordless picture books provide an opportunity for children to apply their visual literacy skills to interpret pictures, infer, predict, develop stories, and respond aesthetically to the illustrations. Wordless books are “pure” picture books (Hillman, 1995). Wordless picture books or “almost” wordless books contain very minimal printed words, one word or a phrase (Lukens, 1999). Wordless picture books provide a structure for conversation and communication. The reader or readers become the storytellers. Reading and sharing wordless books provides opportunities for children to enjoy listening to and discussing a storybook, understand that pictures carry a message as well as text, predict outcomes, increase vocabulary development, and develop literacy. These books also provide an opportunity for adults to model language structure, motivate children to read, and make connections to children’s prior experiences. The purpose of this workshop is to provide teachers with helpful strategies to develop and strengthen students’ literacy skills. These strategies involve activities that will expand students’ vocabulary in their home language as they bridge their learning to a second language. The activities will focus on the use of a wide array of wordless picture books in order to provide students opportunities to experience, develop, and practice literacy strategies, such as; developing sense of story, sequencing, cause and effect, inferencing, predicting, exploring, and questioning. The activities will include one-on-one approaches as well as small group exploration of wordless books or books with few words. Books shared with participants will range from simple concepts to more complex and abstract in nature. These strategies will help teachers in the instruction of a language skills and also support second language acquisition. These strategies will also be helpful for students with reading problems. Furthermore, these strategies focus on research-based instruction through the use of wordless books, which in turn will enhance the young students’ future writing process. Teachers at all levels will be provided with demonstrations and opportunities to participate in hands-on activities to support literacy development. Additionally, participants will be provided assessment instruments as an evaluation component to measure and document students’ progress.

Rapporteur at thworkshop:

SIMONE C. EHMIG, Institute for Research on Reading and Media Stiftung (GERMANY)

Presentation: AELE Team

Language: English

Location: Aula 2532 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)


Studies show that 15.5% of adults in OECD member states have inadequate reading skills. A large number of youngsters also have difficulty reading and writing. Inadequate reading skills indicate the need for measures that promote language and reading competencies as early in life as possible. Reading aloud and storytelling play a highly significant role early in life. Systematic research among children of different age groups and their parents underscore the significance of reading aloud for children’s individual development children. A recent survey among children aged 5 to 10 shows: Almost all children always love reading aloud. They appreciate their parents spending time with them, creating a comfortable atmosphere – and they love to hear good stories. Reading aloud is identified as a basic need most children claim and their parents should comply with. The studies lead to the “proclamation” of a children’s right to be read aloud –at least 15 minutes every day!

Rapporteurs at thworkshop:

  • MURRAY GADD, University of Auckland (NEW ZELAND)
  • DIANA BERTHEN, University of Stockholm (SWEDEN)
  • LARS LUNDGREN, St Eriks Gymnasium (SWEDEN)

Presentation: AELE Team

Language: English

Location: Aula 2533 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)


This workshop will explore the outcomes of a three-month inquiry into an instructional writing programme, undertaken by a team of researchers (n=3) with a group of senior secondary students (n=8) with intellectual disabilities (ID) in the special needs section of a Swedish secondary school. All student participants had been diagnosed as having an IQ of 70 or less at some point in their schooling. The inquiry (which involved tracking levels of student engagement and achievement in writing in relation to programme implementation) aimed to answer the following research question: Do the conclusions that researchers have made about the effective teaching of writing in classrooms populated mainly by typically developing students apply also to classrooms populated mainly by students with ID? It was undertaken because of a scarcity of research-based literature on writing instruction for students with ID. A literature review (1990-2016) generated less than 20 relevant studies and almost all involved four or less students. However, some evidence in the reviewed studies enabled the researchers to hypothesise that instructional actions that work for typically developing students in writing would be likely to work for students with ID. The current inquiry sought empirical evidence as to whether this hypothesis was valid. Qualitative case-study methodology was used. Possible links between programme implementation (a series of six writing lessons planned to incorporate known findings about effective writing instruction) and programme outcomes (gathered through interviews, reflections, observations and learner gains data) were sought. No attempt was made to correlate key outputs with key inputs but some points of possible association were sought. Two datasets emerged from the inquiry – one related to instructional actions; the other to learner gains. Principal instructional actions utilized during the inquiry (namely, task purposefulness; learner involvement in task and goal construction; active demonstration of tasks and practices; deep questioning about writing outputs; differentiation of instruction) were identified. These aligned strongly with those actions deemed to ‘make a difference’ to student achievement in writing according to others’ research. An analysis of student outputs indicated substantial engagement and learner gains during the inquiry, especially in terms of writing productivity, topic development, sentence development and vocabulary development. Within acknowledged limitations, an alignment of these two datasets suggested some evidence of a likely association between key inputs (instructional actions deemed to be effective for all students in writing) and outputs (strong levels of learner gains in writing by students with ID) in the inquiry. This suggested that what is good for all is particularly good for some.

Rapporteurs at thworkshop:

  • LYNDA VALERIE, Central Connecticut State University (USA)
  • SHAKIRA PÉREZ, Classical Magnet School (USA)

Presentation: AELE Team

Language: English

Location: Aula 2534 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)


The goal of language arts is to develop articulate and joyful readers, writers and thinkers. Much of our present teaching focuses on developing writing that is clear, organized, persuasive, evidence-based, and perhaps even insightful. We don’t spend, or think we have, the time, to engage in developing writing that also includes playing with language. So that a story, essay, research paper, poem, lab report, play or case study is not only rubric-worthy but also reader-worthy. The intention becomes not just producing an articulate product but one that the writer has found some joy in the process of creating, and the reader benefits from that process by reading it. How do we then add JOY to this equation? A major detriment, though, is that students are often not motivated to write.   Glazed eyes, low moans and clenched pencils seem to be hallmarks of many writing classes. Another hallmark is the voices of students calling out, “Miss, I don’t know what to write!” or “I’m bad at writing poetry.” Therefore, it is doubly challenging to teach the content against a wall of resistance. The wall of resistance is made of the trepidation of not knowing what to write or feeling that their writing is going to be judged. There are several strategies help motivate student to write. Literature on motivating students to write include: writing for authentic purposes (Frey & Fisher 2010, Wilson 2009), providing choice (Daniels 2010) employing picture books (Braasseur 2009), utilizing creative play (Williams 2009) applying Twitter style entries (Andrew 2010) adapting write-talks (Wilson 2008) producing pod-casts (Goodson & Skllen 2010) and screenplays Bedard & Fuhrken) and remixing old and new literacies (Gainer & Lapp 2010). This workshop focuses on language play strategies to motivate and inspire students to break down the wall of resistance and trepidation about writing. These strategies can also be employed beyond the boundaries of the classroom. Activities include utilizing photographs, drawings, explicit vocabulary exploration, poetry options, and fractured fairytales to encourage students to more readily engage in writing; thus, affording the student the opportunity to develop his/her writing skills and find joy in the process.

Rapporteur at thworkshop:

JEFFERSON BALILA, St. Luke’s Medical Centre-QC (FILIPINAS)

Presentation: AELE Team

Language: English

Location: Aula 2401 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)

Comprehension is a crucial component of literacy that impacts on the child’s learning. Furthermore, it is a very complex cognitive process involving different skills. Recent findings also showed how metacognition and written language play vital roles in comprehension. Therefore, the development, intervention and enrichment of comprehension should go hand in hand with metacognition and written language development. This comprehension program presents an integrated literature-based approach that incorporates study skills, metacognitive instruction, and writing in reading comprehension. This Integrated Literature-based Reading Comprehension Program has three parts namely; Part 1: Study Skills Instruction, Part 2: Story Reading, and Part 3: Written Language Development. The workshop will start with a brief description of the Integrated Literature-based Reading Comprehension Program. Then, the presenter will demonstrate how to conduct each component of the program as a way to develop and enrich a child’s comprehension. The participants will be given guided practice on the steps and strategies used in this program.

Rapporteur at thworkshop:

CHAR MOFFIT, University of Maine at Farmington (USA)

Presentation: AELE Team 

Language: English

Location: Aula 3301 (third floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)


First, participants will experience a Concept-Oriented Reading Instruction (CORI) lesson geared towards primary grade students that focuses on using science concepts to engage students in writing. There are four phases to CORI (Guthrie, 2004): 1. Observe and personalize, 2. Search and retrieve, 3. Comprehend and integrate, and 4. Communicate to others. Lesson Procedures: (1) (Observe and personalize) Participants will observe animals (through the use of a website pebblego.com) After a few minutes of observation time, I will ask the participants to come up with some questions that they want to know about the animals and write a sentence and draw a picture to go along with it. Next, the participants will share some of their questions and we will decide which questions to answer together. (2) (Search and retrieve) We will work with the participants on answering a few questions that they came up with by researching in informational texts and online resources that we will provide. (3) (Comprehend and Integrate) We will make a chart with modeled writing on the information that we retrieved to answer a few of our questions. In small groups, participants will work together to create and write short scripts for puppet shows that include what they have learned about one of the insects. Participants will have an opportunity to make puppets to go along with their script. (4) (Communicate to others) Participants will have an opportunity to share their puppet shows.  After the lesson, we will ask students to discuss with a partner all of the literacy learning that took place during the lesson. We will then discuss as a group all of the learning that can take place in a CORI lesson such as this one. Next, we will present an overview of the CORI study Char conducted in which the above steps were followed. This study explored CORI at the Kindergarten level to examine how this curriculum framework engaged young learners in science concept and literacy learning. Data analysis resulted in five metaphors that show how the students took on multiple identities while engaged in learning concepts during CORI. Students took on the following identities: learner as docent, learner as explorer, learner as researcher, learner as author, and learner as expert. We will also discuss how they engaged with reading and writing throughout the CORI process.

Rapporteurs at thworkshop:

  • ENRIQUE PUIG
  • LAURIE O. CAMPBELL
  • ELSIE L. OLAN

University of Central Florida (USA)

Presentation: AELE Team

Language: English

Location: Aula 3201 (third floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)

At a national and international level, issues of social justice are becoming more transparent with an impetus on supporting teacher-colleagues in educating students to become critical consumers of literacies, with an eye on the innovative use of knowledge. To accomplish such a goal, we strongly believe that there has to be a solid theoretical foundation to tether theory to practice. In this case, we turned to the work of Bakhtin (1981), Freire (1985) and Vygotsky (1978). Bakhtin’s work informs us that to encourage the innovative use of knowledge, conversations have to take place using a give-and-take call to order. Bakhtin suggests that opposing views are seen as strengths rather than hurdles towards seeking solutions. Moreover, not only is dialogical thinking necessary, acknowledging the heteroglossic nature of our conversations is critical to develop innovative uses of current knowledge. Bakhtin suggested that language itself is imbued with culture, intention, background and that even the act of speaking is filled with deep hidden and surface meaning. We relied on this notion of language, in order to identify an ethnographic perspective with which to present information. As part of the presentation, the research and theoretical work of Vygotsky, Freire, and Bahktin is braided into the conversation to ground us in critical rationales for present and future educational endeavors addressing literacy coaching as an issue of social justice. The impact of socio-cultural theory (Vygotsky, 1978), dialogical conversations (Bahktin, 1981), and the idea of learning to read the world before the word (Freire, 1985) is undeniable in any educational enterprise. Consequently, the work of these giants in our field serves to ground and create the foundation for a framework for thinking about the work of literacy coaches as an issue of social justice to better serve present and future teachers and students at a global level. These three concepts provide us with the understanding of what it will take to support educators – university-based research scholars and school-based practitioner scholars – with essential information to make well informed decisions and choices that impact critical literacies to address issues of social justice through literacy coaching. Video will be used to prompt conversations that will impact instruction.

Rapporteurs at thworkshop:

  • DAVID MALLOWS, University College London-UCL, Institute of Education University College (UNITED KINGDOM)
  • JOSE PEDRO AMORIM, University of Porto (PORTUGAL)

Presentation: AELE Team

Language: English

Location: Aula 3202 (third floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)


In this workshop we will present seven guiding principles for the use of terminology in adult literacy that were developed as part of the work of the adult literacy team in the European literacy network ELINET (http://www.eli-net.eu). The principles are intended to draw attention to the importance of the linguistic choices we make when describing and referring to adults who may have literacy needs or goals. Our use of language can have a significant impact in shaping impressions of the needs and capabilities of adult literacy learners. The seven guiding principles have been written to inform choices of language when writing or speaking about adult literacy in our advocacy, research and practice. In the workshop we will outline the principles and the rationale behind them, exploring the need for such principles and the thinking behind the particular ones we have chosen. We will then reflect on their relevance in languages other than English, through analysis of relevant Portuguese policy documents. We will then invite the workshop participants to consider how the principles could be applied in their own languages.

Rapporteurs at thworkshop:

  • ANA TERESA MUÑOZ PÉREZ, Instituto de Educación Secundaria “La Laboral” (SPAIN)
  • JOAQUÍN AYALA, Consejo Escolar de Canarias (SPAIN)
  • JULIO SANTAMARÍA, Instituto de Educación Secuendaria “Guaza” (SPAIN)

Presentation: MARÍA TERESA ACOSTA TEJERA, Directora de la Agencia Canaria de Calidad Universitaria y Evaluación Educativa y del Servicio de Innovación Educativa de la Consejería de Educación, Gobierno de Canarias (SPAIN)

Language: Spanish

Location: Aula 3401 (third floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)


El grupo de profesorado que conforma el proyecto “Tebeos con clase”, con sede en La Laguna (Tenerife), lleva seis cursos proponiendo el cómic como género privilegiado para lograr hacer de la lectura y escritura una práctica social en el contexto educativo, con la ventaja, entre otras, de tratarse de un medio fronterizo con el cine, los juegos y la comunicación. En efecto, la novela gráfica supone un soporte ideal para “leer con otros”. Poco importa si se realiza en voz alta, o de forma individual, dando un tiempo para la lectura atenta de cada capítulo. Lo interesante en este caso es que existe inmediatez a la hora de establecer y compartir las primeras hipótesis sobre la creación del sentido, abordando, mientras se lee, un proceso común de indagación e interpretación. De este proceso surge el sentido: ¿Cuándo empezamos a darnos cuenta del lugar en el que estamos? ¿Cómo percibimos el paso del tiempo en el que se desarrolla la historia? ¿Qué aspectos llaman nuestra atención en los diálogos? ¿De qué manera nos ayuda cada imagen a narrar la historia y a mezclarnos con ella? ¿A través de qué elementos y de qué indicios en las viñetas? En los últimos cursos, además, estos profesores y profesoras han profundizado en un enfoque novedoso: favorecer a través del contacto, real o virtual, con autores de cómic, el conocimiento consciente del proceso creador de los profesionales del medio para fomentar la creatividad artística en las aulas. Cualquier conocedor del medio es consciente del gran interés que muestran sus autores por explicar sus procesos creativos. Sus esfuerzos en este sentido son un diamante pedagógico por pulir. Para esta ocasión, “Tebeos con clase” propone un taller de experimentación en torno a tres formas de acercamiento de lectura, escritura e investigación intertextual en torno al cómic: (1) Entender los elementos narrativos del cómic a través de la creación de fotonovelas. (2) Explorar el cómic autobiográfico y sus posibilidades narrativas y artísticas en el aula. (3) Realizar prácticas de lectura, escritura e indagación intertextual a través de la adaptación de un clásico de la literatura: Nela, de Rayco Pulido, versus Marianela, de Benito Pérez Galdós. Como apuntara Will Eisner, el cómic ha sido a menudo menospreciado porque su atractivo formato y sus bonitas imágenes han dado por sentado su sencillez. Descubramos que no siempre es así.

11.30 a.m. Coffee Break / Performance

C Parallel sessions (Tuesday, 4 July – from 12.00 a.m. to 1.45 p.m.): ROUND TABLES / SYMPOSIUMS

Discussants:

  • HENRIETTA DOMBEY, University of Brighton (UNITED KINGDOM)
  • EITHNE KENNEDY, Dublin City University (IRLAND)
  • GERRY SHIEL, Education Research Centre (IRLAND)
  • VIVIENNE SMITH, University of Strathclyde (UNITED KINGDOM)

Symposium Chair: HENRIETTA DOMBEY

Presentation: ISABEL GALVÍN ARRIBAS, University Complutense of Madrid

Language: English

Location: Sala de Grados (third floor, main entrance, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)


Learning to read and write is a highly complex process, involving, in addition to necessary technical concerns, the making of increasingly subtle and complex meanings, the development of attitudes and identities, the acquisition of cultural capital and the experience of using written language to communicate with a wide range of ideas and people, for a wide range of purposes. Every assessment of literacy learning – whether to monitor levels of attainment, for formative purposes or to inform parents of their children’s progress – should have at least a face validity. It should reflect an informed view of what literacy learning involves, rather than allowing easily measured elements, such as phonics or spelling, to stand proxy for the whole complex and multi-faceted process. In this session we present approaches to classroom assessment that recognise such complexity and help teachers take their students forward – towards a rich, fulfilling literacy that increases their sense of agency in the world.


CLPE Literacy Scales to guide classroom observation

Henrietta Dombey (UNITED KINGDOM)

Language: English

 The Reading Scale and The Writing Scale were recently developed by a London-based team, centred on the Centre for Literacy in Primary Education (CLPE). Freely downloadable, these eight stage scales are now in use in a growing number of schools in England, where they provide an energising complement to the literacy tests required by England’s Department for Education. They are the product of an active collaboration between professional organisations concerned with literacy education. Based on a wide range of research findings, they have been trialled in hundreds of English classrooms. On both scales, each of the eight stages is accompanied by an extensive set of suggestions for ‘next steps’ to be taken by teacher and child.

The Write to Read Writing Rubrics: A Guide to the teaching and assessment of writing in the primary school

Eithne Kennedy and Gerry Shiel (IRLAND)

Language: English

The Write to Read project is designed to improve children’s motivation and engagement in literacy, and to raise literacy levels in schools and communities designated as disadvantaged. It adopts an evidence-based, holistic approach, putting a particular emphasis on developing children’s engagement, agency, creativity and higher-order thinking skills. We wanted an instrument to give teachers, children and parents a common language and frame of reference when discussing writing and also to reliably capture growth in key dimensions (voice, ideas, organisation, word choice, conventions) across the primary school classes, for both formative and summative purposes. We will describe the construction and validation of the rubric, which we will represent with exemplars of children’s writing. Finally, we will consider the rubric in relation to recent national curriculum developments in Ireland.

Discussants:

  • ELIZABETH NARVÁEZ CARDONA, Universidad Autónoma de Occidente (COLOMBIA)
  • LAURA COLOMBO, CONICET-Instituto de Lingüística de la Universidad de Buenos Aires (ARGENTINA)
  • PILAR MIRELY CHOIS LENIS, Universidad del Cauca (COLOMBIA)
  • ALMA CARRASCO ALTAMIRANO, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla (MEXICO)
  • ANNE RUGGLES GERE, Universidad de Michigan (USA)
  • MARISOL GARCÍA, Universidad de Los Andes (VENEZUELA)

Roundtable Chair: ELIZABETH NARVÁEZ CARDONA

Presentation: ELENA BERMEJO GONZÁLEZ, University Complutense of Madrid

Language: English

Location: Aula 2532 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)


Currently, global policies of scientific publication demand graduate students and faculty to deal with knowledge production under paradigms of developed economies and epistemologies belonging to Engineering or Health Sciences. However, developing economies and epistemologies of social sciences and humanities are interesting analytical sites to identify emerging challenges and opportunities of complex encounters between opposite paradigms and disciplines. This symposium gathers scholars on academic and scientific writing from different regions (Argentina, Colombia, Mexico, Venezuela, and USA) to contextualize local demands for educating scientific writers in graduate education and supporting faculty for scientific publication in diverse disciplines.  Individual presentations in English and Spanish will be the context to draw reflections regarding: a) What institutional initiatives might support educating graduate students for scientific publication? b) What interregional and interdisciplinary cooperation might benefit education of writers for scientific publication? c) What research projects might help in understanding and supporting education for scientific publication across disciplines and economy contexts?

Doctoral writing groups for the advancement of dissertation and publication writing

Language: English

Writing groups support participants while they face authentic writing projects related to dissertation progress and dissemination of preliminary results.These types of pedagogical initiatives seem to be uncommon in Latin America (Carlino, 2008a, 2008b). This presentation describes two types of doctoral writing groups in Argentina according to the discipline: Education, Humanities and Social Sciences.

Enseñar a escribir como científico desde el proyecto de tesis

Language: Spanish

Se presentan algunas maneras en que profesores especialistas en salud apoyan a los estudiantes en la elaboración de su proyecto de tesis en dos programas de maestría de una universidad pública colombiana. El análisis está orientado a identificar las oportunidades, limitaciones y retos de las prácticas pedagógicas, en función de su contribución a la formación en escritura científica.

Publicar un artículo científico ¿antes o después de cerrar la tesis de posgrado?

Language: Spanish

Esta presentación contrasta dos experiencias de escritura académica de estudiantes de posgrados en México (Puebla y Aguascalientes).  Se propone contrastar las diferencias entre producir una tesis de grado y un artículo científico como géneros “completos” que exigen considerar destinatarios y demandan acompañamiento experto que es casi inexistente.

The Role of Ethics in Educating Graduate Student Writers

Language: English

The presentation will report on an initiative to insure that graduate students learn to approach writing about their research from an ethical standpoint.  Dimensions of this presentation include decisions about authorship, varying levels of contribution, relationship to the work of others, representation of subjects and/or data, principles of reciprocity, and it raises questions about how interregional and interdisciplinary cooperation might support ethical approaches to these decisions.

Programa de tutoría para la formación de docentes investigadores en una universidad venezolana

Language: Spanish

Se presenta la sistematización longitudinal (2011-2015) de la trayectoria de publicación de un postulante a docente investigador en una universidad venezolana y de la orientación ofrecida por la tutora. Se analizan los productos publicados (ponencias, artículos científicos, reseñas bibliográficas) y un registro de entrevistas con el docente investigador postulante. Los datos revelan características de las políticas de formación de investigadores en la institución de la que surgen los datos y  nutren la discusión sobre la formación de tutores como orientadores de los procesos de escritura en el campo disciplinar.

A proposal to support faculty for scientific publication in a Colombian university

Language: English

This presentation describes institutional contexts and theoretical paradigms from the field of Writing Studies to conceptualize the development of advanced academic literacy. From these contexts, pedagogical decisions of a proposal to support faculty for scientific publication in a Colombian university are presented.

Discussants:

  • ENRIQUE PUIG
  • LAURIE O. CAMPBELL
  • VIKI KELCHNER
  • ANDREA GELFUSO
  • JEANETTE GARCIA
  • NICOLE DAMICO

University of Central Florida (USA)

Roundtable Chair: ENRIQUE PUIG

Presentation: TAMARA MORATO MORATILLA (SPAIN)

Language: English

Location: Aula 2533 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)


At a national and international level, the cry for initiating and sustaining professional networks focused on improvement is becoming more transparent with an impetus on educating students for a global workplace, with an eye on the innovative use of knowledge to educate students for college and career. In response, the United States’ second largest university and preparer of one of the greatest number of educators in the nation (teachers, administrators, and specialists), the University of Central Florida’s College of Education and Human Performance is creating a professional networked improvement community of promising practices utilizing a transdisciplinary spectrum for instruction. Teacher education must focus on learning to improve in ways that are systematic and organized with teacher candidates and teachers within a transdisciplinary spectrum that accounts for language diversity, mindfulness, and learning that can help link sound research-proven instructional practices to goals, standards and reflection to prepare students with the 21st century skills of: critical thinking, problem solving, communication, collaboration, creativity and innovation. Starting with identifying specific problems of practice and designed with a common theory of improvement, static (e.g. student standardized scores, state categorizations, grades) and dynamic (e.g. mini-ethnographies, focus groups, interviews) data will be utilized to describe the strengths and needs of organizational structures, processes, and tools that will highlight our ability to learn and improve educational outcome for students. The work will be problem of practice specific and teacher/student centered anchored in improving practice through disciplined inquiry. Through effective narratives of participation, this interactive session will introduce a professional networked improvement community of practice to support the professional learning and leadership necessary to sustain and expand our understanding of language diversity and learning. As part of the session, the research and theoretical work of Vygotsky, Bahktin, Clay, Csíkszentmihályi, Knowles, Cambourne, Rosenblatt, Alvermann, and Moje is braided into the conversation to ground us in critical rationales for present and future educational endeavors. The impact of socio-cultural theory, dialogical conversations, early literacy acquisition theory, adolescent literacy acquisition, flow theory, adult learning – andragogy, transactional learning theory and conditions of learning is undeniable in any educational enterprise aimed at improving practice. Consequently, these seminal works in our field serve to ground and create the foundation for a framework for thinking about the work to better serve present and future teachers and students at a global level. During the session, participants will engage with presenters to create a foundation to assemble a network to promote forward shifts in language diversity and learning in teacher education. The session is intended to promote the concept of socially constructed knowledge and distributed cognition to support the learning of everyone in school. On-line tools and technologies used for sharing promising practices will be introduced in addition to how the networked approach will foster the acceleration of the ability to learn and reach improvement goals. Throughout the presentation each presenter will facilitate conversations to assist participants in acknowledging and utilizing resources to develop plans that promote forward shifts in understanding language diversity, learning, engagement, pedagogy, humanities and practice. Through narratives, this interactive session will introduce a professional networked improvement community of practice to support the professional learning and leadership necessary to sustain and expand our understanding of language diversity and learning. During the session, participants will engage with presenters to create a foundation to construct a network to promote forward shifts in language diversity and learning in teacher education. Throughout the presentation each presenter will guide the conversation to assist participants in acknowledging and utilizing resources to develop plans that promote forward shifts in understanding language diversity, learning, engagement, pedagogy, humanities and promising practices on a transdisciplinary spectrum.

Discussants:

  • MARIANNE McTAVISH, JIM ANDERSON and ANN ANDERSON, University of British Columbia (CANADA)
  • LINDA LAIDLAW, University of Alberta (CANADA)
  • SUZANNA WONG, University of Alberta (CANADA)

Symposium Chair:

  • MARGOT FILIPENKO, University of British Columbia (CANADA)

Presentation: JEROEN CLEMENS, Reading Association in the Netherlands (NETHERLANDS)

Language: English

Location: Aula 2534 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)


The unprecedented proliferation of digital technology and new media and their incursion into homes, schools and other places of learning have raised many questions and concerns. For example, the National Association for the Education of Young Children and the American Pediatric Association initially responded to the spread of new technologies with position statements warning parents and educators about the dangers of allowing young children access to them. Both organizations have since produced more nuanced, but still quite guarded advice to families and educator, but conceerns and issues persist. The presentations in this symposium report on current emprical studies that examine how digital technology is actually taken up by children, youth, families and educators.


Early childhood educators’ use of digital technologies in the classroom: A paradox?

Jim Anderson, Ann Anderson, Jane Hare and Marianne McTavish (CANADA)

In this paper we report on early childhood educators’ (ECEs) perspectives of the role of digital technology in young children’s development, learning and daily lives, and on their own, and children’s, uses of digital technology in their classrooms. Data are drawn from a larger, mixed methods study examining young children’s access to, and engagement with digital technology, in a culturally and linguistically diverse, and socially disadvantaged, community. Findings revealed the ECEs’ philosophical positioning about the use of technology in the preschool classroom suggested ambivalence, yet they took up technology in ways that contradicted this stance. A second finding suggests that the children in these settings are using technology without the benefit of the ECEs or parental support.

Old Questions, New Practices: Shifting Parent and Teacher Perspectives on Children’s Digital Worlds

Linda Laidlaw (CANADA) 

Contemporary children exist in a rapidly changing technological world where they are engaged in new textual practices and increasing digital engagements. Parents and teachers are faced with having to navigate increasingly complex challenges, including guiding children whose technological expertise and capacities may exceed their own. We present findings from a Canadian and Australian study addressing key impacts, influences and implications for parents and teachers, based on interviews and survey data over a three year time span. Our project reveals perspectives which are becoming more nuanced over time, as well as complex entanglements of influences such as those from popular media.

New Ways to Create “A Gift for Mom”: A Preschooler’s Multiliteracy Practices at Home

Suzanna Wong (CANADA)

In today’s digital world, children have shifted to use digital devices for communication, entertainment, information searching, and play. These changes inevitably impact on children’s literacy practices and learning. This paper draws on a study that examined the complex ways preschoolers engage in multiliteracy practices at home. In this presentation, I will share one example from my study, which shows a 4-year old girl’s attempt to use multiple modes and ‘remix’ print and digital texts to create a gift for her mother. This example illustrates the importance for teachers to recognize the funds of knowledge children bring with them to school.

Discussants:

  • CONNIE BRIGGS, Texas Woman’s University (USA)
  • MARY ANNE DOYLE, University of Connecticut (USA)
  • ALLYSON MATCZUK, Canadian Institute of Reading Recovery (CANADA)
  • JULIA DOUETIL, University of London (UNITED KINGDOM)
  • ANNETTE TORRES-ELIAS, Texas Woman’s University (USA)
  • CELESTE BATES, Clemson University (USA)

Roundtable Chair: CONNIE BRIGGS, Texas Woman’s University (USA)

Presentation: OLIVER BECHARA O’HARE, University Complutense of Madrid

Language: English

Location: Aula 2401 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)


Overview

Dr. Connie Briggs (USA)

Reading Recovery ® is a highly successful, short-term, early intervention designed to reduce the numbers of children who find learning to read and write most difficult and the costs of these learners to education systems. Currently, the program is implemented in Great Britain, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and the United States. An International group of trainer colleagues work together, as a system, to support research and development that has shown to be effective at accelerating the learning of children at-risk for literacy learning within 12-20 weeks across international contexts, in a variety of schools and educational systems.

Theory

Mary Anne Doyle (USA)

Reading Recovery is predicated on a complex theory accounting for the acquisition and strengthening of perceptual and cognitive, in-the-head working systems that change over time from early, primitive systems to mature literacy behaviors. Learners link and integrate many sources of information (auditory, language structures, phonological, visual, movement, and speaking/articulating) as they read and write meaningful messages.   Over time, with exposure to authentic texts, learners construct efficient systems and reveal problem-solving, strategic behaviors that are observed on instruments measuring change in reading/writing proficiency. Therefore, growth is revealed by acquisition of mature literacy behaviors in contrast to scores or enumerative skills.

International Training

 Allyson Matczuk (CANADA)

Research has repeatedly demonstrated the significance of a skilled and knowledgeable teacher. This is particularly true for young literacy learners who need support the most in order to get underway with reading and writing. Reading Recovery teachers, trained by highly qualified teacher leaders, receive a year of professional development and ongoing professional support through a carefully designed and delivered system that has been proven over four decades and across multiple international educational systems. The model has been lauded as that of the highest quality, consistently deepening teacher professional knowledge to support development of students with idiosyncratic literacy needs.

Reading Recovery: International Languages

Annette Torres-Elias (USA)

The impact of Reading Recovery addresses the needs of students with diverse linguistic needs. Descubriendo la Lectura (DLL) is the reconstruction of Reading Recovery to Spanish. It is currently implemented in school districts with dual language education programs in the United States. Intervention préventive en lecture-écriture (IPLÉ) is the redevelopment of Reading Recovery in French for Canada. DLL and IPLÉ were originally designed for students in grade one having difficulty learning to read and write in their native language. Now the interventions are also available for students who are learning Spanish or French as a second language.

International Implementation

Celeste Bates (USA)

The international implementation of Reading Recovery is unique given that education systems vary greatly from country to country. Challenges in one geographic location may not be present in another and attention to individual settings and their educational histories is paramount to the implementation of the early intervention. To address these challenges and provide consistency across sites, the International Reading Recovery Trainers’ Organization focuses on specific areas that support the implementation. The areas include guidelines for delivery, the training of teachers, the lesson components, and practice that is grounded in a complex theory of literacy learning and development.

International Data and Student Outcomes

Julia Douetil (UNITED KINGDOM)

Any investment in intervention must be based on reasonable expectation of achieving its goals. In Reading Recovery every child’s attainment is monitored before, during and after intervention. This systematic monitoring supports quality assurance and student outcomes; engineering the implementation into the local context and assessing the impact of implementation decisions; and advocacy for vulnerable children. International data show remarkable consistency in outcomes across very different settings in the short and long term. A consistent core of data allows international analysis, whilst flexibility around local measures addresses context specific issues, e.g. progress of children from indigenous peoples, the impact of national and local literacy initiatives and progress in high stakes national assessments.

Discussants:

  • MARGARITA GUTIÉRREZ VALDÉS, Public Elementary School “Kantic@ Arroyo”, Castilla y León (SPAIN)
  • JOSÉ HERNÁNDEZ ORTEGA, “El Valle” Secundary School, Madrid (SPAIN)
  • CARMEN REIGADA PÉREZ, Education advisor at in-service teacher training – Cuencas Mineras de Asturias (SPAIN)

Roundtable Chair: TAMARA ALÍA PRIETO, Spanish Reading and Writing Association

Language: English

Location: Aula 2531 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)


Emotional intelligence and literacy: towards an emotionally literate school starting in the class emotional education

Margarita Gutiérrez Valdés (SPAIN)

The object of study is the emotional education as a tool for conflict resolution and how to achieve the emotional management of an educational centre. In the last 30 years the interest in the study of intelligences and their role in the teaching-learning process have been a growing concern for teachers. From Gardner and his Theory of MI, followed by Daniel Goleman to the recent studies of Katherine Weare, one of the UK’s leading experts on the emotions and education, “emotional literacy” is a reality.


Multimodal literary representations: from technology to literary epistemology

José Hernández Ortega (SPAIN)

The representations that acquire the Language and Literature are multiple and varied, although in practice the textual format continues to dominate almost exclusively. In this paper, we will discuss how discursive multimodadity is changing the way readers of 21st century acquire reading habits and knowledge: robotics, programming, Project Based Learning, active methodologies, etc. In a multimedia society it is necessary to adapt the literary processes to multimedia environments and, fundamentally, technological ones in which the students have innate abilities to which they can not be denied their existence and development.


Multilingualism, beyond the learning of languages

Carmen Reigada Pérez (SPAIN)

Learning languages has always been an instrument to satisfy the need of human beings to communicate, at inter-individual level, but also at intercultural level; we will try to raise questions that lead us to reflect on how to teach and learn languages shaken by the dizzyingly changing society of the 21st century. Features such as the importance of motivation, the permanent feeling of uncertainty, methodological innovations, the survival of local cultures, languages as a vehicle for communication and also for the transmission of culture, the lingua franca… We will ask ourselves what implications do they have, what challenges do we face, for teaching in general and for languages in particular, in increasingly multicultural European and Latin American classrooms. Finally, we will try to identify references that may guide us to find the right direction to make our way.

Discussants:

  • ANDAMANA BAUTISTA GARCÍA
  • MARÍA A. CALCINES PIÑERO
  • BLANCA HERNÁNDEZ QUINTANA
  • CRISTÓBAL L. NUEZ GARCÍA
  • ÁNGELES PERERA SANTANA
  • JUANA ROSA SUÁREZ ROBAINA

Universidad de las Palmas de Gran Canaria (SPAIN)

Roundtable Chair: ÁNGELES PERERA SANTANA

Presentation: MARÍA TERESA ACOSTA TEJERA, Dirección de la Agencia Canaria de Calidad Universitaria y Evaluación Educativa y del Servicio de Innovación Educativa de la Consejería de Educación, Gobierno de Canarias (SPAIN)

Language: Spanish

Location: Aula 3301 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)


La formación de lectores competentes que encuentren en la lectura un placer, una fuente de información y un medio de promoción personal es uno de los retos que la sociedad presente y futura tiene por delante, en el ámbito educativo, pero también en el del desarrollo individual y colectivo. El concepto de lectura ha ido evolucionando de modo que ya no se entiende leer como descifrar el código sin más, aunque este sea un requisito indispensable: si no se reconocen los signos gráficos y se les asignan los fonemas correspondientes, no se puede avanzar hasta lograr una habilidad lectora mayor que incluya la comprensión, la interpretación y la recreación del texto. Teniendo en cuenta que hay muchos tipos de textos, es necesario que reflexionemos sobre la necesidad de preparar distintos tipos de lectores que logren desentrañar los significados que encierra cada uno de estos modelos textuales, o acaso nos enfrentamos de forma similar a una receta de concina, una novela, un poema, un artículo periodístico o un manual de instrucciones. Una de las lecturas más extendidas en la escuela, y que más se utiliza en la educación reglamentada, es la lectura literaria. Podemos definir la competencia literaria como la capacidad del receptor para captar e identificar las características propias del texto literario e, incluso, diferenciarlo de otras producciones artísticas. Esta competencia requiere que la persona que se enfrente al texto posea conocimientos lingüísticos, textuales y discursivos, pero también saberes pragmáticos para reconstruir la situación enunciativa que el texto presenta (estructura, indicios del tipo de texto de que se trata), conocimientos del uso literario, saberes intertextuales que se refieren a las conexiones que los textos literarios pueden tener entre sí, etc. El simposio que presentamos aborda una reflexión sobre la competencia literaria y la educación en una lectura que vaya más allá de la interpretación literal y descontextualizada del texto. Defendemos una práctica significativa que ayude a descubrir las diferentes capas que pueden encontrarse detrás una primera lectura rápida, centrada en entender y pronunciar las letras. Este propósito debe plantearse como un proceso continuo que comienza en las primeras edades y en el que se va avanzando en complejidad y profundidad, y en el que se van proponiendo modos de lectura diferentes, además de recursos y materiales diversos.

¿Competencia literaria en la primera infancia?

Andamana Bautista García

Language: Spanish

La competencia literaria nos permite expandir las ventanas por las que percibimos la realidad que nos rodea y también expresar de formas ricas y variadas lo que experimentamos en contacto con nuestro entorno. Nos da la habilidad de manejar la lengua como herramienta de comunicación cargada de rasgos especiales que van más allá del contenido esencial de las palabras. Es más, reconocer obras de naturaleza estética y saber valorarlas como tales nos convierte en ciudadanos formados para disfrutar y utilizar distintos códigos semióticos que compartimos con los demás. Sin embargo, todos recordamos prácticas vinculadas a la lectoescritura en las que no se tomaba en consideración el hecho de que el niño es susceptible de ir construyendo su competencia literaria. Si los primeros contactos del niño con la letra escrita se limitan a producciones del tipo “Mi mamá me mima. Yo mimo a mi mamá” y a libros con marcadas intenciones didácticas como aquellos en los que se recogen simplemente los nombres de los colores, las formas geométricas, los animales de la granja o los transportes, podemos estar enseñando, en lo que se refiere a destrezas relacionadas con la adquisición de la lectura y la escritura, a descifrar el código, pero estamos dejando de lado la práctica creativa del niño que construye el significado y el sentido de lo que lee. El texto literario en la primera infancia abre la puerta a la interacción estética y en esta interacción estética no solo halla el niño placer, sino que también experimenta las ilimitadas posibilidades de la palabra, integra que el mundo es tan grande como él pueda imaginar, aprende que tiene permiso para intervenir en lo que lee y en todo este proceso se descubre a sí mismo. Por eso es tan importante abordar en el aula el modo en que los pequeños pueden acercarse a estos textos, seleccionar los más apropiados y presentarlos a través de actividades motivadoras y atractivas.

Lectura en el siglo XXI: competencia lectora en el aula de Secundaria

María A. Calcines Piñero

Language: Spanish

La lectura es nuestra herramienta principal de recepción de información y, por lo tanto, ha de ser la habilidad más trabajada en las diferentes materias durante el proceso de enseñanza-aprendizaje. Asimismo, el siglo XXI y el desarrollo tecnológico que lo caracteriza han añadido una exigencia nueva: la lectura digital. Nuestro alumnado, nacido en la era de la sociedad de la información y la comunicación, es asiduo usuario de variadas herramientas tecnológicas mediante las que reciben múltiples mensajes. La facilidad y la rapidez con la que los jóvenes reciben tanta información añade complejidad al desarrollo de la competencia lectora ya que ha de prepararlos para entender una multiplicidad de textos tan amplia como necesidades de la vida real se hayan de contemplar. Por consiguiente, la extos tan amplia como necesidad de la competencia lectora ya que ha de incluir una variedad de textos tan amplia como necesidadcomprensión de textos en soportes diversos junto a una actitud crítica y reflexiva ante ellos son elementos clave en el desarrollo y adquisición de la competencia lectora. El objetivo de esta comunicación es presentar el procedimiento que se lleva a cabo en el trabajo de la competencia lectora en el aula de Educación Secundaria. Partiendo del análisis del nivel competencial del alumnado, se analizarán las exigencias organizativas y metodológicas que se han de contemplar para que la adquisición de la competencia lectora sea elemento clave en los procesos de enseñanza y aprendizaje y, en consecuencia, factor de éxito escolar.

De mujeres y libros: cómo ser mujer lectora y no morir en el intento

Blanca Hernández Quintana

Language: Spanish

Pese a que en la sociedad actual esté tan denostada, la educación literaria sigue siendo uno de los principales pilares sobre el que debe girar todo proceso de aprendizaje. No podemos despreciar la sensibilidad que ha construido el bagaje cultural de nuestra civilización y nos ha legado sus bienes más preciados: la palabra y el pensamiento, y la lectura proporciona estas herramientas, cuyo dominio es fundamental. Resulta difícil cuantificar o medir, de alguna forma, los beneficios que proporciona la lectura, porque son intangibles, no medibles, pero los estudiantes constatan que, después de leer un libro, saben más, conocen un poco mejor el mundo que les rodea y a ellos mismos/as, sin saber explicar por qué, como si sólo los libros pudieran darnos acceso a una parcela de la realidad a la que no podríamos acceder de otro modo. La realidad está hecha de palabras que dan forma a nuestro pensamiento y que, a su vez, nos definen. Pero la realidad también se puede desmontar inculcando al alumnado el desarrollo del pensamiento crítico, un pensamiento que le permita analizar el mundo que le rodea y contribuir a mejorarlo. Una forma de mejorarlo es apostar por la inclusión de textos que aborden la igualdad entre hombres y mujeres, y que ayuden a desmontar los estereotipos sexistas. Muchos textos disfrazan de normalidad historias impregnadas de la ideología de la superioridad masculina, la invisibilidad femenina o que encasillan a hombres y mujeres en un rol predeterminado. Bajo estas reflexiones, desarrollamos una revisión y propuesta didáctica de lecturas que promulguen los valores de la igualdad a través de la educación literaria. Se pretende formar a lectores y lectoras que puedan identificarse con historias que reproducen un mundo más igualitario.

¿Solo libros en la biblioteca? Recursos y espacios lectores

Cristóbal L. Nuez García

Language: Spanish

La existencia de una biblioteca como simple fuente de conocimiento y acceso a los libros ha quedado notoriamente enriquecida con las actuales tecnologías y las posibilidades de interacción con el texto. Sin embargo, en muchos centros educativos encontramos todavía bibliotecas con material desfasado en sus estantes; espacios en los que el alumnado solo puede entrar en silencio o que se han convertido en almacén de aparatos obsoletos. Frente a estudiantes imbuidos en el mundo multimedia, este panorama resulta poco atractivo y motivador. Ante esta evidencia, consideramos necesario contar con espacios dinámicos, cambiantes y abiertos al mundo, en los que ocupe también un papel importante el uso de la tecnología con un nivel adaptado a la edad y características de nuestros discentes. Serían así lugares que abren las puertas y se expanden por el centro y fuera de él, llegando de una manera más seductora a toda la comunidad educativa y, en especial, a nuestro alumnado. Obtener la complicidad de las familias facilita, por otra parte, la gestión de estos espacios de lectura, fomenta la visión positiva y cercana de la biblioteca y propicia una mejor disposición del alumnado hacia ella. A su vez, esta percepción de zona compartida anima al profesorado a involucrarse en su gestión, a fomentarla como lugar de acceso a la información (texto escrito y multimedia), y a incluir la biblioteca en sus propuestas didácticas. Ante estas necesidades, la Biblioteca del Centro del Profesorado trata de ejercer un modelaje para los docentes; ello incluye dinámicas de participación y modelos de uso del mundo digital (con sus diferentes formatos) que fomenten el acercamiento al libro con una visión del siglo XXI.

De jardines e islas: actualización de los mitos en la LIJ canaria

Ángeles Perera Santana

Language: Spanish

En la literatura infantil y juvenil canaria contemporánea confluyen dos tradiciones muy fuertes, de un lado, la de la literatura infantil como fenómeno universal, que ha conformado una forma de atender a los lectores más jóvenes y de organizar las obras destinadas a este público. De otra, la de la tradición literaria canaria que no siempre se refleja de forma consciente en los textos. Estas fuerzas se unifican en ocasiones, se contraponen en otras, de ahí que los textos para niños y jóvenes escritos en Canarias recojan temas que encontramos también en la literatura canaria para adultos. Entre estos temas se encuentra la mitología. En las obras de literatura infantil y juvenil canaria aparecen mitos aborígenes, pero también clásicos, e incluso hay relatos en los que aparecen elementos míticos de origen desconocido que tal vez sean fruto de la invención del autor alimentada por las creencias populares. En los textos se van entrelazando mitos conocidos y recreados con otros inventados, es un movimiento continuo entre realidad y ficción en el que lo soñado es más auténtico que lo palpable. En este trabajo se analizan algunas obras y los elementos míticos en los que se sustentan, pero también se hace una reflexión de cómo podrían trabajarse en el aula de Educación Primaria y Secundaria de modo que se convirtieran en un itinerario en el que el alumnado fuera descubriendo sendas que se van abriendo. Algunas de ellas se abandonan, mientras otras se siguen y llevan a nuevas lecturas, a indagar sobre la tradición literaria común, pero también sobre la tradición literaria universal. La educación literaria se convierte entonces en una forma de rastrear y aprender con el texto como guía; es un camino que se empieza y que no se sabe dónde acabará.

Lectores, libreras y Educación literaria: persiguiendo un sueño

Juana Rosa Suárez Robaina

Language: Spanish

¿Están las palabras condenadas a repetirse, infinitamente?  “La experiencia discursiva individual de cada persona se forma y se desarrolla en una constante interacción con los enunciados individuales ajenos” (Bajtin, 1989).  Ya  apostillaba igualmente Borges que lo que consideramos como creación casi en realidad es una mezcla de olvido y recuerdo de lo que hemos leído. Así sucedió, si bien no tanto en medio de un proceso de creación sino de lectura, cuando cayó en nuestras manos Mi maravillosa librería de Petra Hartlieb (editado por Periférica en 2015), relato-testimonio sobre la singular gestación de la autora como librera en Viena, ciudad donde inicialmente no vivía la emprendedora nata Petra. Su lectura nos llevó, automáticamente (¿evocación?, ¿huella?, ¿complicidad?, ¿alusión?) a otra obrita, igualmente editada por Periférica hace unos años (2012) pero dada a la luz casi un siglo atrás: La librería ambulante del estadounidense Christopher Morley.  En esta última nos reencontramos con la misma fórmula: mujer más emprendimiento en el oficio (casi improvisado) de librera. Coincidimos plenamente con las palabras de Reyes (1984) “La literatura se refiere al mundo y también se refiere a la literatura…” En ambos relatos dos mujeres abandonan un día la vida que llevaban la jornada anterior y se estrenan, ilusionadas, en el nuevo oficio, el de libreras, compartiendo en sus respectivos nuevos entornos el desasosiego que genera un cambio pero, sobre todo, conversaciones sobre los “buenos” libros. La comunicación que presentamos propone una breve revisión de la literatura como palimpsesto y un apunte sobre la contribución de la didáctica del intertexto a la educación literaria.

1.45 p.m. Lunch Break

C Parallel sessions (Tuesday, 4 July – from 3.15 p.m. to 4.15 p.m.): ORAL PRESENTATIONS / POSTERS

Location: Aula 2531 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)

Presentation: AELE Team

Language: English


Connecting Student Diversity through Literacy Teaching for Preservice Teachers

Apasara Chinwonno, Chilalongkorn University (TAILANDIA)

Language: English

Student diversity has transformed the characteristic of 21st century student populations in mainstream classrooms. Teacher educators tend to inadequately prepare preservice teachers for students with diverse social and cultural backgrounds, particularly for socioeconomically disadvantaged student populations in Thai urban schools. In Thailand and throughout Southeast Asia, literacy has emerged as the influential social practice contributing to students’ educational opportunity and socioeconomic mobility. Since literacy teaching depends upon cognitive, historical, sociopolitical, sociocultural and economic factors within and beyond the classroom, it should be envisioned to address the learning needs of diverse students for world communication and connection and value the diversity of languages, cultures and experiences in local communities. Connecting to students’ lived experiences, cultural identities and communities may influence their literacy practice and academic success. If teacher educators turn this power in student diversity into opportunity for educational equity through local and global literacy, they may effectively prepare literacy teachers for diverse learning communities. This mixed-methods study investigates preservice teachers’ reflection and implementation on literacy teaching practices at Thai Secondary Schools. In Phase I, findings from Repeated Measures indicate the highest significant changes in appropriate relationships, personal characteristics and diverse needs before, during and after the student teaching. Phase II examines how they implement such changes during a one-year period teaching practice. Based on the Classroom Observations and Teacher Self-Development Reports, they differentiate literacy practices to (a) build relationships with the selection of contents and materials: culturally relevant materials, local community and critical literacy, (b) develop personal characteristics for teaching tasks: culturally sensitive teaching and extensive reading-writing connection, and (c) address diverse needs through teachers’ use of languages: questioning, providing feedback and collaborative tasks. Implications lead to unfold the gap between pedagogical knowledge and classroom practices, and empower national and international literacy teachers to address student diversity in global contexts.


Preservice Teachers’ Sense of Efficacy for Literacy Instruction

Corinne Valadez and Frank Spaniol, University Corpus Christi (USA)

Language: English

Teachers’ sense of efficacy, teachers’ beliefs about their abilities to bring about desired outcomes of student engagement and learning, was identified almost 30 years ago as one of the few teacher characteristics related to student achievement (Ashton & Webb, 1986). Since then, researchers have been interested in the origins, measures, and factors cultivating the formation of efficacy (Tschannen-Moran & Woolfolk Hoy, 2001, 2009 & Tscannen-Moran, 2011). In addition to being related with student achievement, teacher efficacy has been associated with commitment to teaching, teachers’ persistence in the teaching field, and teacher burnout (Grant, 2006). Bandura’s (1977) theory of self-efficacy suggests that efficacy may be most malleable early in learning, thus the preparation program of teacher educators may be critical to the long-term development of teachers’ sense of efficacy. The purpose of this mixed-methods longitudinal study was to measure pre-service teachers’ sense of efficacy throughout their undergraduate reading courses and to pinpoint which specific factors from their reading coursework affected their sense of efficacy for literacy instruction and prepare them for their state competency exam. The following research questions guided this cross sectional method study. 1) How does an undergraduate reading delivery system affect preservice teachers’ sense of efficacy for literacy instruction? 2) How does an undergraduate reading delivery system prepare preservice teachers for the state competency exam? To answer the research questions, three types of data were collected for this study, the Teachers’ Sense of Efficacy for Literacy Instruction Scale(TSELI), open-ended responses to course specific focus groups, and professional certification exam scores which were correlated to scores from the TSELI.


Exploring Literacy among Roma: an Ethnographic Study in a Greek Context

Fani Valai,  Eleni Gana and Maria Papadopoulou University of Thessaly (GREECE)

Language: English

Roma constitute the largest minority in Europe and, at the same time, the most disadvantaged and socially excluded one. The dominant discourses construct Roma as illiterate, with no experiences about literacy, connecting thus much of their marginalization with low school attendance and high drop-out of school (UNESCO 2014). The current study presents an ethnographic account of literacy practices in a romani community in Greece. Adopting the perspective of cultural studies and by means of ethnographic methodology the study investigates vernacular and everyday literacy practices of the members of the romani community in order to figure out: a) the nature of literacy practices used in their everyday life, b) the domains connected to these local practices. Data collection was carried out through a) participant observation, b) formal and informal interviews and discussions and c) collection of texts and written artifacts that were created by the participants. Data analysis was conducted through three stages (Copland & Creese, 2015): a) initial analysis, which included content coding, b) integrated analysis, which included the addition of comments based on photos, videos and interviews and c) microanalysis, which included delicate transcription and line-by-line analysis of the recorded interviews and discussions. Following data analysis, three distinct categories of literacy practices have been observed: a) dominant literacies, which are used to govern and regulate specific actions of the community members regarding authorities (school, governmental, religious institutions), b) semi- dominant literacies, which are initiated by dominant practices, but are used to sustain the social and commercial interaction in romani community and c) dominated literacies, which are used exclusively inside the community and are related to family practices.


Improving access to administrative texts for people with low literacy: a social work project at the School of Social Work

Anne Parpan, Simone Girard and Annette Lichtenauer, School of Social Work, University of Applied Sciences and Arts (SWITZERLAND)

Language: English

The UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities claims participation of disabled persons in all societal spheres. In connection with the requirement that people should be able to read and understand official texts, one possible approach and a first step towards inclusion of people with low literacy is providing documents in ‘easy-to-read’. The objectives of the present project carried out in close cooperation with a local Child and Adult Protection Authority were threefold: (1) to develop tailored easy-to-read documents, (2) to involve persons out of the target group as examiners in the development process and to learn about the challenges in the organization and community-building for comprehensibility-check, (3) to analyze the impact of the easy-to-read documents in practical use. In the first phase an information booklet on the procedure of guardianship and letters were developed in ‘easy-to-read’. All documents were checked in an iterative review by staff of the Adult Protection Authority as well as by a group of examiners with cognitive disabilities. With regard to access and inclusion, our preliminary results show interesting effects: For instance, the involvement of persons from the target group in the examination went along with a learning process regarding the reading and understanding of a written text. We hypothesize that for specific groups of non-readers, easy-to-read can be a door opener and a useful training resource creating a feeling of competence. Further, the authority staff as document-users have been largely sensitized to the needs related to low literacy. However, a challenge was revealed: due to their experience of non-understanding, people with low literacy may not recognize the accessibility of written documents. This shows that participation through easy-to-read is a long term undertaking: by sensitizing the target groups and stakeholders, easy-to-read may become a real resource. However, broader efforts towards literacy are needed.

Location: Aula 2532 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)

Presentation: AELE Team

Language: English


The use of reading strategies in foreign language instruction in higher education setting         

Milevica Bojovic, University of Kragujevac (SERBIA)

Language: English

Reading is a complex process of understanding the meaning of a written text, employing various cognitive skills – letter and word recognition, knowledge of syntax, and recognition of text types and text structure. While reading, different reading strategies are used. Reading strategies are specific actions or techniques that students use, often intentionally, to improve their progress in developing reading skills. The participants were undergraduate biotechnology engineering students learning English as a foreign language at the University of Kragujevac, Serbia. The variables included the students’ use of language reading strategies, levels of foreign language proficiency, frequency of testing reading, language learning environment (blended vs. face-to-face), and gender. The instruments involved a foreign language placement test and Inventory of reading strategies in a foreign language, a five-point Likert scale, used to measure the students’ use of language reading strategies. They were administered to the participants by their language teacher during regular foreign language classes. The results obtained by using SPSS Package for Windows show that the biotechnology engineering students frequently used their prior knowledge to understand the written text, re-read for better understanding, used text features and visualized. The strategies used rarely involved taking notes and summarizing. The students’ higher scores on foreign language placement test indicated more frequent use of reading strategies. The students exposed to blended language learning used reading strategies more frequently than their peers exposed to face-to-face language instruction. The students’ use of reading strategies in a foreign language may be affected by the frequency of testing reading comprehension and gender.


Literacy, Performance and Foreign Language Education: Equity, Community Engagement and Best Practices

Habib Zanzana, The University of Scranton (USA)

Language: English

The staging of legends and fairy tales in the foreign language classroom presents a unique opportunity for students to explore, at the personal level, aspects of humanity, world history, language, and culture. This presentation on literacy and performance provides a framework for a comprehensive pedagogical case study of two foreign language puppet legends written and designed for the stage. The first legend titled, “Leila and the Mythical Sandbox” is written in Arabic and was performed by university students using stick puppets and a puppet stage built by the performers and members of the community. The second legend, composed in verse and with rhyme, using an annotated text in Spanish, was performed by university students and children from the community and is titled “”Moctezuma y los cinco soles poderos: La resurección del imperio azteca.” In both projects, the students built the puppets, the stage, the props and the costumes and staged a performance in front of a live audience. They also contributed to aspects of the narrative and story development thus making literacy a fundamental building block of the learning process. Applying Benjamin Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy to the Arabic and the Hispanic Puppet Learning Projects frames the multiple learning dimensions involved as students work collaboratively to produce a community-based, artistic project using either Arabic or Spanish as the vehicle of communication. The first part of the presentation delineates the nature of the each Puppet Learning Project, its goals and objectives and explains how text and performance were structured and staged in front in front of the public. Cognitive, psychomotor, and affective learning domains are important categories that are the focus of the second part of this presentation. The results of this study show that puppet theatre creates a comprehensive learning platform in which the three learning domains coalesce and contribute to the development of performance literacy, equity, community engagement and best practices.


Dual Language Context: Transforming Spanish/English Emergent Bilinguals’ Language and Biliteracy Skills

Eurydice Bauer, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (USA) and Soria Colomer Oregon, State University (USA)

Language: English

This study documents how the placement of a dual language program in a low-income, working class school impacted the students being served. It uses a translanguaging framework to understand how students approached literacy. Our findings suggest that students’ home language does not predetermine students’ literacy performance. Students who came into the program with both Spanish and English language skills performed more strongly than those with one language at home. All students showed gains in their English skills, even though 90% of their instruction in year 1 and 80% of their instruction in year 2 was in Spanish. Findings were consistent across both years. We propose educators can better appreciate and build on students’ bilingualism by adopting a translanguaging framework, which may transform the education of these emerging bilingual students.


Predicting reading outcomes in the first year of primary school: the role of invented spellings        

Ana Albuquerque and Margarida Alves Martins, ISPA – Instituto Universitário (PORTUGAL)

Language: English

Learning the alphabetic principle and the relationships between speech and print is one of the biggest challenges in early school years. Several studies have shown that letter knowledge and phonemic awareness play a crucial role in this process and seem to be two strong predictors of literacy acquisition at the beginning of schooling. However, few researchers have explored the predictive effects of preschool children’s invented spellings on their reading skills in the first year of primary school. Our study aims at researching the relative impact of invented spellings, letter knowledge and phonemic awareness tested in the last year of kindergarten on children’s reading outcomes at the end of Grade 1. The participants were 90 Portuguese five-year-old children who attended three schools in Lisbon and did not know how to read or write. Their invented spellings, letter knowledge and phonemic awareness were assessed at the end of kindergarten and their reading performance was measured at the end of Grade 1. Correlation analyses between the three literacy skills and the children’s reading outcomes revealed positive scores for invented spellings, followed by phonemic awareness and letter knowledge. An additional regression analysis suggested invented spellings as the predictor skill with the strongest impact on reading outcomes at the end of the first year of primary education. This research provides empirical support for developing invented spelling activities in preschool years aiming children’s future success in literacy learning.

Location: Aula 2533 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)

Presentation: AELE Team

Language: English


What I liked best was working in groups because we could exchange information about the texts and help each other when writing our own” (Feedback after an intervention in class, female student, 15) – Is cooperative learning a key factor for reading and writing in diverse classrooms?

Elfriede Witschel, Pädagogische Hochschule Kärnten, University College of Teacher Education (AUSTRIA)

Language: English

One of the major challenges in teaching literacy today is the increasing social and cultural diversity in the classroom. As a result, teachers are supposed to find ways of enabling pupils of all abilities to develop reading and writing skills in order to be able to fulfill their potential for personal growth and well being throughout their lives.

Leaving behind the familiar triangle of learners, teachers and content, a study carried out by the OECD identifies a fourth key element in the so-called pedagogical core – namely resources – and thus includes physical resources as well as learning materials. In this new learning environment, the learner is seen as its core participant who is encouraged to complete individualized tasks specifically designed for him or her, either independently or cooperatively. (cf. OECD 2013). This presentation will share selected results gleaned from an intervention study carried out with secondary students (n= 83). Using the OECD model as a starting point, the theoretical model developed for this study is based on the assumption that the connection between reading, speaking and writing not only facilitates both the reading and the writing process, but also improves the written products. An example will be used to show the effectiveness of a specific in-class activity where learners work with a text to complete both independent and cooperative tasks. Special emphasis will be given to data regarding lower achievers.


Developing literacy skills in secondary technical-vocational education

Maria Kovacs and Ariana Vacaretu, Asociatia Lectura si Scrierea pentru Dezvoltarea Gandirii Critice (ROMANIA)

Language: English

While at first sight training to become an electrician may not seem concerned with literacy, students in technical-vocational education do need to develop their general and specific job-related literacy skills. On the one hand, these students in Romania are still in compulsory education, and therefore they need literacy skills for learning across the curriculum, and ultimately for lifelong learning, if they are to function as citizens in the contemporary society. On the other hand, electricians need specific literacy skills to perform well in their profession. They need to be able to read and understand plans, blueprints, instructions, health and safety-related documents, contracts, as well as document their work and communicate with customers in writing, etc. In the Erasmus+ KA2 project entitled Integrated reading and writing support in vocational education and training, led by Pädagogisches Landesinstitut Rheinland-Pfalz of Speyer (Germany), the Romanian partners, Asociatia Lectura si Scrierea pentru Dezvoltarea Gandirii Critice (ALSDGC) and Colegiul Tehnic Energetic (CTE) collaborate to support teachers of technical and non-technical subjects to focus their teaching on literacy skills development. A group of CTE teachers, with support from ALSDGC trainers, have been working to identify appropriate strategies for reading and writing vocation-specific texts, and for including literacy activities in scenario-based (situated) learning contexts. In the spring semester of the 2016-7 academic year, these teacher are going to start teaching using scenario-based integrated reading, writing and reflection activities. In our presentation, we share the experiences of these teachers and their students, and some conclusions on what approach to literacy skills development works for CTE, the specific literacy skills that the students develop with such an approach to teaching/ training, and whether and how this approach can be scaled up to the level of all faculty of CTE, and extended to other secondary technical-vocational education and training institutions.


Literacy as Supply and Demand

David Mallows, UCL Institute of Education (UNITED KINGDOM)

Language: English

This paper will draw on three data sources – a national survey from Germany of adult literacy and numeracy skills (leo. – Level-One Study), the OECD’s Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competences (PIAAC), and case studies of workplaces in England – to argue for a greater focus by policymakers and researchers on the literacy demand experienced by adults. It will consider the heterogeneity of the population of adults deemed functionally illiterate by large-scale national and international surveys and question how such a large group of adults are indeed able to function in society. It will draw on concepts of literacy practices and the literate environment to try to understand the demands on adults’ reading and writing and suggest that adults with poor literacy skills may be reluctant to engage in learning because they experience very low demand. Engagement in literate practices is an important mechanism through which literacy is improved and developed. If the demands on many adults’ literacy are so low, their skills may decline/fail to develop, leaving a large sub-class excluded from the literate environment and relying on others for interpretation and access to information. This vicious circle of underuse and consequent loss of skills should be a major concern for policy makers.


Supporting teachers’ professional development through literacy research                  

Eva Fjällström and Adrian Rodriguez, Luleå University of Technology (SWEDEEN)

Language: English

Recent international comparisons have repeatedly indicated that Swedish adolescent reading literacy levels are declining (OECD, 2014). These negative results have fuelled intensive debate about the Swedish education system and led the Ministry of Education and Research to invite the OECD to evaluate Swedish education policy and practice. The evaluation revealed number of areas in need of urgent attention. One of these was creating opportunities for teachers to develop as professionals (OECD, 2015, pp. 111-137). Against this background, we will, in this presentation, illustrate how literacy research projects can support teachers’ professional development through different forms of collaboration between teachers and researchers. We draw on empirical data from two separate education studies involving a total of 13 teachers of English and 320 adolescent learners of English. One study focused primarily on literary meaning-making in classroom settings and adopted a participatory research methodology. The other study focused on online reading and comprehension and was planned and carried out together with teachers. Interviews with teachers who took part in the two studies show that participating in classroom research led teachers to feel empowered and further investigate and develop their own conceptualisations of reading literacy and educational practice. Several of the participants also pointed out that they had started collaborating more with colleagues through their participation in the research projects. Based on these findings, we argue that if issues of empowerment and professional development are taken seriously in the design of literacy research projects, immediate benefits are likely to be observed in the context of the study.

Location: Aula 2534 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)

Presentation: AELE Team

Language: Spanish


Twitter como plataforma para la creación literaria. Experiencia en el aula       

Concepción Torres Begines, Universidad de Huelva (SPAIN)

Language: Spanish

En esta comunicación se presenta un mini-proyecto docente llevado a cabo en una clase de Literatura Española del Grado de Educación Infantil basado en el uso de Twitter como plataforma de creación literaria. Para ello, se propuso a los alumnos la creación de un microrrelato respetando los 140 caracteres de la plataforma y conteniendo la palabra clave #libro, común a todos los participantes. Además, se indicó a los alumnos que debían respetar los diferentes elementos del género narrativo, previamente presentados en clase, esto es: tiempo, espacio, personajes y acción y los propios del género del microrrelato, del cual se proporcionaros numerosos ejemplos de autores españoles que se comentaron y analizaron en clase. Para motivar al alumnado, se propuso además la constitución de la actividad como un concurso, por lo que añadimos el elemento lúdico y la metodología de la gamificación. La actividad tuvo muy buena acogida, sintiéndose los alumnos responsables de su propio aprendizaje con la puesta en práctica de elementos teóricos vistos en clase y que les sirvieron para estructurar mejor su microrrelato, como las distintas caracterizaciones del espacio, el uso de las voces narrativas, etc. Además, se buscó fomentar el uso responsable de las redes sociales por parte del alumnado, dándoles algunas indicaciones sobre el funcionamiento de Twitter y sus principales recursos, prestando especial atención a la utilidad de los hashtags como medio para localizar contenidos en la red.


Literatura infantil y juvenil en la era de la convergencia a través de un MOOC

Alba Torrego González, Universidad de Valladolid (SPAIN)

Language: Spanish

En este trabajo se aborda la puesta en marcha de la primera edición del MOOC “Infantil y Juvenil en la Era de la Convergencia” (goo.gl/7Idg0V), que se ha celebrado entre el 9 de mayo y el 5 de junio de 2016. Este curso nace en el marco del Proyecto ECO (Elearning, Communication and Open-data: Massive Mobile, Ubiquitous and Open Learning”) y ha sido creado por los miembros del Proyecto de Innovación Docente de la Universidad de Valladolid “BooktUVa”, que tiene como fin la creación de objetos de aprendizaje- siguiendo la estética Booktuber- que contribuyan a guiar a las familias y a la comunidad educativa en la educación lectora de niños y adolescentes. El objetivo del MOOC se centraba en el conocimiento y análisis de la influencia de los medios digitales en la educación lectora de niños y adolescentes así como en la reflexión sobre las nuevas formas de socialización de la lectura promovidas por los propios adolescentes dentro de la Cultura de la Participación. En esta comunicación se analizan los resultados de participación en esta experiencia formativa, que ha contado con un total de 147 participantes, que han podido aproximarse y debatir sobre las formas emergentes de abordar la literatura infantil y juvenil en la red así como participar en foros y realizar diferentes actividades relacionadas con sus prácticas didácticas. También se analizan las estadísticas de participación y de finalización del curso así como los datos de procedencia geográfica y ocupación de los participantes para conocer futuras líneas de trabajo para estos cursos online.


Creo y publico mi primer libro

Claudia Patricia Guerrero Gaviria and Julia Helena Quesada, Colegio Cambridge (COLOMBIA)

Language: Spanish

Aprender a escribir puede considerarse una condición de supervivencia social y cultural en tanto que en los contextos alfabetizados gran parte de las interacciones se encuentran mediadas por diversos usos de la lengua escrita y el dominio de la misma. Dentro de este marco, la enseñanza de la lengua escrita implica asumir una perspectiva sociocultural del lenguaje (su aprendizaje y su enseñanza), en la que se reconozca que la apropiación de la escritura está relacionada con la participación efectiva en prácticas de lenguaje, en las que se habla, se lee y se escribe con propósitos específicos a interlocutores concretos y en situaciones determinadas. Por tanto, la didáctica de la lengua se constituye en una mirada compleja sobre los procesos y actividades implicados en la enseñanza y el aprendizaje del lenguaje, en donde las preguntas por el cómo y el qué enseñar se encuentran subordinadas y conectadas de forma interdependiente con las preguntas por el para qué, quienes, cuándo, dónde y por qué de la enseñanza. Por lo anterior, en nuestra práctica de enseñanza de la lectura y la escritura nos propusimos diseñar una secuencia didáctica denominada “Creo y publico mi primer libro”, en el marco de la conformación de prácticas innovadoras para la enseñanza del lenguaje en los primero grados. Otorgando un mayor sentido a la producción de textos narrativos con características graficas similares al formato del libro álbum. Desde comienzos del año 2011 se ha venido implementando en los primeros grados (pre-escolar y primero) con el objetivo de permitir que los niños ingresen a la cultura escrita trascendiendo la dimensión técnica de la escritura. Así cada niño y niña crea una historia que publica a manera de libro álbum. En los grados de preescolar ésta se realiza de manera física y en grado primero digitalmente.


El tercer espacio de alfabetización en Educación Primaria: la perspectiva de las familias     

Celia Moreno Morilla, Fernando Guzmán-Simón and Eduardo García-Jiménez, Universidad de Sevilla (SPAIN)

Language: Spanish

La presente investigación aborda los procesos alfabetizadores desde una perspectiva social y situada. Los alumnos de Educación Primaria desarrollan sus prácticas alfabetizadoras en diversos dominios y situaciones de la vida diaria (Barton, 1991). Partiendo de los Estudios de Literacidad (Barton, 1994; Barton & Hamilton, 1998; Baynham, 1995; Gee, 1991; Maybin, 1993; Street, 1995), esta investigación se centra en el análisis de las prácticas letradas de los alumnos de Educación Primaria desde la perspectiva de sus familias. El estudio realizado responde a un enfoque que combina el uso del método de encuesta, apoyado en el uso de autoinformes, con un diseño no experimental explicativo que permite determinar las diferencias existentes en las prácticas letradas de las familias y escolares a través de ciertas variables personales y contextuales. En él, participaron 1843 familias de alumnos de segundo y tercer ciclo de Educación Primaria de la provincia de Sevilla, que representan diferentes índices socioeconómicos y culturales (ISC). Estas familias cumplimentaron un autoinforme sobre las prácticas letradas de sus hijos que fueron analizados utilizando estadísticos univariantes, análisis de Componentes Principales para Datos Categóricos (CAPTCA) y análisis de la varianza (ANOVA). La investigación evidencia una escasa conciencia de las familias como agentes alfabetizadores y muestra el aporte del dominio hogar como “tercer espacio” en la alfabetización de los escolares.

Location: Aula 3201 (third floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)

Presentation: AELE Team

Language: English


Believing is Doing: A Case Study of EFL Teacher Beliefs and Practices   

Yang Gao and William P. Bintz, Kent State University (CHINA); and Ziyang Zhang, MYoung Education (CHINA)

Language: English

While numerous studies have been done on teacher beliefs and practices over years, there is still dearth of literature on this topic in the EFL context. This case study examines whether teachers’ theoretical orientation in reading and teaching reading fits the way they teach in authentic classroom. The selected participants were two Chinese EFL teachers, one male and one female lecturers. Three different theoretical orientations indicating behavioristic, cognitivist, and constructivist reading beliefs were further matrixed into dominant, dual, and multiple belief systems, which were then used to classify and measure the stated beliefs and actual practices. An abductive and iterative way to analyze the data from both classroom observation and survey responses was used in the study. The study yields the findings that two theoretical orientations as a dual belief system revealed in their stated beliefs about reading and reading instruction are behaviorism and cognitivism. The two observed teachers expressed their favor to the dual reading belief system in their surveys, and then applied their beliefs consistently to their actual practice in the classroom. In other words, the finding reveals a consistency between what they had stated in the survey and how they actually taught in the classroom. The study is significant in contributing to the undeveloped area in EFL education, particularly in the Chinese context. Future studies can be improved by changing the methodology and sample size to make the results and findings generalizable to other contexts.


Mini-lessons to support vocabulary. A qualitative study on cooperation in teams of teachers in a multilingual school

Charlotte Reusch, National Centre for Reading (DENMARK)

Language: English

Research in reading shows that the size of the vocabulary is an important factor when it comes to students’ reading development (National Reading Panel, 2000). The size of the vocabulary is closely connected to socioeconomic status (Hart & Risley, 1995) and institutions therefore have to compensate students from disadvantaged families. In a suburban grade 0-9 school (students age 6-16) close to Copenhagen with 93 % L2 learners, many from disadvantaged families, the National Centre for Reading is carrying out a modified lesson study project during the academic year 2016-2017. As evaluations have shown that students in this school perform poorly due to insufficient Danish, the project aims to support teachers’ ability to integrate language and especially vocabulary no matter what is on the agenda, assuming that explicit vocabulary instruction will contribute to content area learning. Although the mini-lesson project is inspired by the lesson study methodology (Cerbin & Kopp, 2006), teachers who teach different content area subjects work together. Danish teachers typically teach 2-4 content area subjects. At this particular school teachers form teams and share responsibility for e.g. all grade 4 classes. Therefore, mini- lessons focus on vocabulary learning strategies that students might apply in all contexts.


Equity in Early Childhood: Bridging the gap between affluent and poor schools

Annalene van Staden University of the Free State (SOUTH AFRICA) and Francisca Serrano, University of Granada (SPAIN)

Language: English

Research affirms the importance of early childhood language input and emergent literacy skills development, as well as long-term effects of effective literacy development, irrespective of the language to be acquired and the literacy development, in either L1 or L2. Drawing from the seminal work of social constructivist learning theorists such as Vygotsky and Bruner, this paper argues for the role and interplay of both extrinsic and intrinsic factors affecting adequate language exposure and literacy development during the initial schooling (aka early literacy phase) in both the L1 and the second language to be learned. In addition, we also draw on the ecological systems theory such as Bronfenbrenner, illustrating the important interplay of both intrinsic and extrinsic factors in the language and literacy development of both L1 and L2 learners. Realising the important role and input of teachers in establishing a sound L1 and L2 development (for example, in English), the current paper explores the challenges of teachers, teaching English as a second language at early childhood settings in South Africa (n = 10) and Spain (n = 10). Reviewing both countries data , it is evident that learners from rural areas have numerous challenges in acquiring the sufficient levels of literacy in both L1 and L2. Also availability of resources in L1 and L2, including teachers’ perceptions of challenges contributing to both L1 and L2 literacy development is discussed. Recommendations to improve reading and writing (in both L1 and L2) in an attempt to bridge the gap between affluent and poorer schools will be provided.


El lenguaje visual en la literatura infantil colombiana: “una nueva tendencia en el siglo XXI”

Diana Marcela Camacho, Universidad Pedagógica Nacional (COLOMBIA)

Language: Spanish

En pleno siglo XXI, la importancia del estudio de la imagen como uno de los recursos de comunicación se hace cada vez más apremiante, dada la tendencia de nuestra cultura hacia lo visual, así como el eminente giro del lenguaje verbal al lenguaje visual. Basta con adentrarse al mundo de la literatura infantil, y detenerse en observar como son presentadas las narrativas para la infancia. En un principio, con acentuada atención en el lenguaje verbal, las narrativas vehiculizaban a través de palabras, el arte poético y sublime de la literatura. No obstante, con la integración del arte visual en la producción de las narrativas, se teje una estrecha articulación entre un estilo narrativo visual y verbal, surgiendo nuevas perspectivas a considerar en la literatura infantil. Ahora bien, con la acogida del lenguaje visual y su impacto en la infancia, las imágenes se hallan pintando narrativas visuales en las páginas de las obras infantiles. En consecuencia, el presente documento busca comprender cómo se concibe la literatura infantil colombiana del siglo XXI que ha sido desarrollada a partir de un lenguaje exclusivamente visual con miras a realizar una aproximación a la siguiente pregunta de investigación: ¿cómo los docentes pueden apropiarse de un discurso visual materializado en imágenes para enriquecer las experiencias de lectura literaria de los infantes?. Para ello, se busca dialogar con las obras colombianas de tendencia visual, que atesoran tanto arte como literatura, indagando por la teoría de la imagen, condición imprescindible para develar la naturaleza de la literatura infantil a partir de tres ejes teóricos: arte, lenguaje e infancia, paralelo a la estética de la recepción con la reivindicación del sujeto lector en su papel de coautor y ciudadano.

Location: Aula 3202 (third floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)

Presentation: AELE Team

Language: Spanish / Portuguese (it is indicated in each case)


Afetividade na leitura de “O velho e o mar”         

Elizangela Goncalves Pinheiro Oliveira Bastos and Jade Olivieira Bastos, Universidad do Porto (BRAZIL)

Language: Portuguese

Este trabalho pretende abordar as relações entre a tríade obra-autor-leitor, a partir dos conceitos de afectividade, segundo Luc Ciompi e António Damásio. Analisar-se-á a influência da simetria do afecto-lógico na cognição individual e coletiva por intermédio da relação ensino-aprendizagem. Primeiramente, demonstrar-vos-ei, algumas relações de leitura com base no sistema, acima citado, que o sujeito estabelece quando seleciona um livro para leitura. Questões da comunicação e da linguística textual estão relacionadas ao lado afetivo, racional e prático por fazerem parte do movimento circular do ato comunicativo. A perspectiva será partir de uma leitura particular da obra O velho e o mar, de Ernest Hemingway, a memória do autor. Trata-se, ainda de uma leitura que se constituiu por intermédio do imaginário de Gaston Bachelard e Gilbert Durand.


Acompañar la escritura en la educación a distancia         

Carmen Durán Rivas and Mireia Manresa Potrony, Universitad Autònoma de Barcelona / Institut Obert de Catalunya (SPAIN)

Language: Spanish

Aprender a escribir textos diversos con grados de complejidad y finalidades distintas no es nunca una tarea fácil para nadie, niños, adolescentes o adultos. Parte de esta complejidad viene dada por la necesidad de prestar atención a todos los procesos implicados, desde la planificación hasta las estrategias de textualización y de revisión de los escritos, pasando por la búsqueda y selección de la información necesaria. Todo este entramado de procedimientos implica dominar distintas habilidades y competencias que tienen que ver con la composición del texto. Es decir, el estudiante tiene que poder controlar la producción de sus textos en función de la intención comunicativa que lo mueve y tiene que conocer las características lingüísticas y discursivas de estos. Por todo ello, el aprendizaje de la escritura requiere de una enseñanza planificada y sistemática en todos los niveles educativos que aborde estas dificultades y que dote de estrategias a los escritores noveles para encararlas con éxito. En esta comunicación plantearemos el acompañamiento del aprendizaje de la escritura en los estudios de graduado en Educación Secundaria que ofrece el Institut Obert de Catalunya en la modalidad de educación de adultos a distancia. Sobre todo, nos centraremos en qué estrategias son más útiles para ayudar al estudiante a revisar y mejorar sus propios textos. Partimos de la idea de que la consciencia sobre el propio aprendizaje y las ayudas explícitas a lo largo del proceso permiten dotar de autonomía al estudiante y desarrollar su competencia escrita. Como ejemplo de estrategias de activación de la conciencia sobre el proceso de aprendizaje de la escritura, describiremos una de las propuestas didácticas que llevamos a cabo: el informe como instrumento de revisión textual.


El caso de los niños del Barrio Castillo en Yerba Buena, Tucumán. Lectura fuera de la formalidad académica

Victoria María Desjardins, Municipalidad de Yerba Buena (ARGENTINA)

Language: Spanish

Se presentará el caso de un grupo de niños tucumanos, de un barrio específico en la ciudad de Yerba Buena, que asisten a establecimientos escolares de gestión pública (es decir, que dependen del Ministerio de Educación de la Provincia de Tucumán). A través de ellos, mostraremos qué vinculación tienen con la lectura, escritura y alfabetización desde las Escuelas Públicas a las que asisten y, al saber que se trata de niños en situación de vulnerabilidad y riesgo y emergencia pedagógicas, mostraremos también cómo la Municipalidad de la Ciudad ha intervenido (y continúa haciéndolo) de manera directa sobre ellos, brindado el apoyo necesario para que tengan un óptimo aprendizaje de lecto-escritura y alfabetización. En el caso puntual del material teórico de lectura sugerido por los lineamientos enviados desde el Ministerio de Educación de la Nación, cuya injerencia es directa sobre el Provincial y, a su vez, sobre cada establecimiento educativo público de la provincia mostraremos, también, cómo no siempre lo sugerido para trabajar dentro de las aulas es lo indicado o correcto. Se realiza esta afirmación teniendo en cuenta que, muchas veces, se envían materiales y contenidos “idealizados” para cursos y alumnos determinados, que poco tienen que ver con la realidad a la cual los docentes tucumanos deben enfrentarse diariamente. Consideramos que, en reiteradas oportunidades, las sugerencias sobre material de lectura no llega a interesar a los niños (lo cual provoca los altos índices de materias desaprobadas) porque nada tienen que ver con sus propias realidades. Para ello, mostraremos cómo intervenimos desde la Dirección de Educación de la Municipalidad tanto en los establecimientos educativos como con estos niños, para fomentar el interés de los mismos y, luego, poder plasmarlo en rendimiento académico.


“Palabras que abrazan”: las primeras manifestaciones orales como vínculo lectoescritor

Beatriz Suárez Quijada, Centro de Educación Infantil y Primaria público, Valladolid (ESPAÑA)

Language: Spanish

En esta comunicación se plantea una premisa que aborda la importancia de los primeros años de infancia como fundamentales en el desarrollo de la competencia oral y escrita. La propuesta tiene lugar en las aulas de Educación Infantil y trata de visibilizar la repercusión de los modelos educativos (familiar, escolar y social) para acceder al código lectoescritor. Cada acción cotidiana forma parte de un contexto narrativo que favorecerá la adquisición de estructuras mentales que capacitarán para la expresión e interpretación de textos: somos y hacemos Comunidad de lectores y escritores.

Desde la escuela proponemos a las familias que nos ofrezcan ese primer texto que leyeron o cantaron a sus hijos: las canciones de cuna, los cuentos con los que dormían, sus historias de vida…para formar parte de las páginas de un libro hecho entre todos. En el aula nos muestran como el vínculo que establecieron en los primeros días surgió a través de la voz, la narración y la música. Nos acercamos a las primeras manifestaciones orales que serán la base de los futuros lectores y escritores. A partir de esta iniciativa se produce una situación comunicativa muy potente y creativa en la que tanto familias como niños recuperan las palabras e imágenes para establecer un contexto inspirador, donde sus canciones, cuentos y experiencias se transforman en un libro común que entre todos escribimos e interpretamos. Desde la canción de cuna surgen otras estructuras narrativas donde la historia que comparten con nosotros de cada uno de sus hijos e hijas, es transformada en el aula en un texto narrativo-visual a partir de palabras e imágenes que hemos fotografiado y visionado de la propuesta del aula utilizando soportes diversos: gráficos, audiovisuales y con las Tics. La creatividad y las emociones aparecen directamente relacionadas con el proceso lectoescritor dando lugar a contextos educativos que favorecerán el acceso a la interpretación y producción de códigos orales y escritos, especialmente los relacionados con la propia vivencia haciendo significativo y funcional cada aprendizaje.

Location: Ground floor, center aisle (Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)

Presentation: MARIA PARRALEJO SANZ, University Complutense de Madrid

Language: English


Implementing a children’s literature family biliteracy project in English and Spanish

Amie Sarker, University of Dallas (USA)

Language: English

Family and faith traditions can be rich resources for increasing students’ oral and written language skills in English and Spanish. This session will describe the Faith and Family Story Backpack Project implemented in two-way immersion schools (English/Spanish), including a brief overview of the underlying research base and practical applications for implementation, such as the actual text set titles used, procedures, and helpful resources. The goals of this project were to increase the time family members spent reading, writing, and talking about literature together, develop emerging bilingual and biliteracy skills among Pre-K through early elementary grade students, and create more home-school connections. Framed by sociocultural learning theory (Vygotsky, 1978) this project seeks to draw upon and affirm the “funds of knowledge” that students’ families possess, “these historical accumulated and culturally developed bodies of knowledge and skills essential for household or individual functioning and well-being” (Moll, Amanti, Neff, & González, 1992, p. 133), in order to support and extend academic learning. Culturally relevant children’s literature can affirm students’ identities, increase motivation to read, and scaffold comprehension (Ebe, 2010; Freeman & Freeman, 2004; Gibbons, 2002; Hadaway & Mundy, 1999; Vyas, 2004). Text sets, as a curricular strategy, involve compiling a set of related books that students read, discuss, and make intertextual connections with (Rosenblatt, 1978). This approach allows readers to better understand and relate to other books and issues (Harste, Short, & Burke, 1988). This project involved teachers interactively reading aloud in class the children’s literature texts from culturally relevant theme-based sets. Students then took home the books to reread and respond to with their families. Each student kept a journal where together with family members they recorded visual and written responses, and included connections to family stories and traditions.


Growing Bilingual Authors: Writing in a Bilingual Gifted and Talented Program

Robin Danzak and Jessica Chivatá, Sacred Heart University (USA)

Language: English

This poster presents an investigation of bilingual (English-Spanish), expository writing of forty students (grades 4-8) attending bilingual gifted and talented (GT) programs at two, urban public schools in the northeastern United States. Although Latinos comprise 25% of U.S. public school enrollment, (NCES, 2016), they average only 9% of GT enrollment in 21 reporting states (NAGC & CSDPG, 2015). With educational attainment for Latinos on the rise (Krogstad, 2016), increased opportunities to participate in GT, honors, and advanced placement courses –and, thus, increase cultural capital (Montoya, Matias, Nishi, and Sarcedo, 2016)- are essential. The study setting, an urban district, enrolls nearly 50% Latino and 99% low-income students. Participants were recruited from two, K-8 schools offering transitional-bilingual, dual-language, and English Learner programs, as well as bilingual GT programs. Most students in both schools’ GT are Latino and bilingual (65%). To compare writing across grade levels and languages, participants composed expository texts on two topics, in both English and Spanish. To learn more about the students’ language and literacy skills, as well as language use, we also collected outcomes on English reading measures (AIMS web and iReady tests), the LAS-Links (speaking, listening) test of Spanish language proficiency, and a Language Experience and Use Questionnaire (Danzak, 2011). Students’ writing is being evaluated on various levels: 1. Text level: Holistic measure of overall text organization and structure (e.g., Danzak, 2011; Danzak & Arfé, 2016). 2. Sentence level: Total number and types of clauses, clausal density (Nippold et al., 2008). 3. Word level: Total words, number of different words, type-token ratio, number of derived words, percent of words spelled correctly. Analysis is currently underway. Outcomes have implications for placement and instruction of bilingual GT students, helping inform educators of bilingual students’ strengths and challenges as they acquire bilingual writing skills over time.


The connection between hearing-impairment and the comprehension of read text

Angéla ImrePéter Gombos and Ildikó Baranyosi, ELTE BGGYK (HUNGRY)

Language: English

Hearing – in the case of intact intelligence, hearing and sight – shows a very close connection with the mother tongue. This means that in order to be able to learn how to read, a proper level of mother tongue knowledge is required. Within this, speech perception and comprehension processes play a decisive role. Today in Hungary there are around 700,000 people who have some level of hearing disability. According to topical literature, hearing which is not intact has an influence on speech perception and comprehension processes. Does this mean that it influences the quality of reading comprehension? In this process, there are some key facts which relate to the level, discovery and actual initiation time of the impairment, and eventually the level of improvement (due to, for example, an implant). This research examined the comprehension of children of different ages and varying levels of hearing impairment. A case study was carried out for each person. For this research, we used a reading test, which we prepared for three different age groups, and for each group there was one belletristic and one non-belletristic text. There were 80 hearing-impaired participants, and a control group of equal number and age. How does the implant influence the improvement of reading comrehension? What are the results of children that had the hearing-impairment from the age of 7 or later? Does the type of text make any difference in the level of comprehesion? Based on our research and the following results, we worked out the basic framework needed for developing a sufficient level of vocabulary and reading comprehension for this special group of children.


A school network in teaching children with reading and writing problems in Hong Kong

Fuk-chuen Ho, University of Hong Kong (CHINA)

Language: English

The aim of project was to set up a school network for teachers to have a platform for an interactive exchange of ideas, resources, services, and expertise among different schools that mutually address the needs of children with learning disabilities. A number of five primary schools were invited to participate in this scheme. Two teachers of each school were selected to participate in this scheme. Teachers of each school were requested to identify an area of concern in reading or writing and to develop a 10-week teaching programme for children with dyslexia in the chosen area of concern. The identified areas of concern included story telling for word identification, summarization for reading comprehension, recognition of word functions for writing, use of five senses for sentence making and implementation of co-teaching in teaching word recognition. A 5-day cross-site visitation was held among the five member schools during the implementation of the teaching programmes. Individual interviews were conducted for principals and teachers of member schools to evaluate the effectiveness of the scheme. It was found that teachers of member schools benefitted from the experience sharing among schools in designing their own teaching programmes. The most significant finding was that the motivation of the students was enhanced and their reading and writing skills were improved.


Examining the Complexity of Literacy in Family School Partnerships between Middle Eastern Families and U.S. Schools

Cynthia Reyes, University of Vermont (USA)

Language: English

Although the importance of family-professional partnership in U.S. schools is clear, research suggests that the realities of partnership generally fall short, and families of students from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds are at a heightened disadvantage in partnering with education professionals. Drawing upon research literature from the fields of family literacy and family-professional partnerships this study examines the communication that Middle Eastern families with refugee experiences engage in as they come to understand the U.S. school system, and the cultural brokering activity that mediates family perceptions of school and their children’s education. In this study, part of a larger multiple-embedded case study, we interviewed Iraqi families, their adolescent children, their teachers, and any interpreters that they accessed. Preliminary findings describe the different and sometimes arbitrary ways that families and teachers perceived communication within the family school partnerships. These findings serve to highlight refugee families’ funds of knowledge and strategies they use to navigate their children’s schooling needs.

Read more about Renata Valtin

Special Rapporteur: RENATE VALTIN, Humbolt University Berlin (GERMANY)  

The European Declaration of the Right to Literacy – How can we ensure that it is implemented?

Literacy has been recognized as a human right for over 50 years in several international declarations and initiatives which – however – are rather unspecific. The European Declaration of the Right to Literacy, developed in 2016,  identifies 11 conditions required to put this basic literacy right into practice. The Declaration embodies the belief that, with the right support in place, children and young people can develop strong literacy skills, and adults can improve their skills and take their rightful place in society. In the lecture some good practice examples are provided how to realize these conditions. 


  • Location: Sala de conferencias (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)
  • Language: English

C Parallel sessions (Tuesday, 4 July – from 4.15 p.m. to 6.00 p.m.): ROUND TABLES / SYMPOSIUMS

Discussants:

  • SHERI VASINDA
  • JESSICA FISHER
  • ALEX AKERS
  • PEYTON KING

Oklahoma State University (USA)

Roundtable Chair: SHERI VASINDA

Presentation: TAMARA MORATO MORATILLA (SPAIN)

Language: English

Location: Aula 2531 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)


Context: “Moving Targets”: Monolingual English-speaking Preservice Teachers Tutoring Chinese Emergent Bilinguals in a US Reading Clinic

Sheri Vasinda (USA)

Language: English

Traditionally, university reading clinics serve three purposes: preparing teachers in assessment methods and effective instructional strategies, providing targeted affordable support for struggling K-12 students, and opportunities for research (Englehardt, 1974; Laster, 2013). This context provides a carefully supported opportunity for preservice teachers to grapple with the complexities of teaching, beginning with just one student in the role of a tutor and supported by faculty. They apply previous course knowledge to an authentic, unique, and complex context. In the fall of 2016, the Randall and Carol White Reading and Math Center at the University of Oklahoma, USA, had an influx of newcomer Chinese students from families of international students and visiting faculty. This context caused a shift, or “moving target” in course content for the instructor and new discoveries for the preservice teachers. Each of the preservice teachers will present her pedagogical discoveries in terms of merging literacy strategies and technology integrations to create successful experiences for her EB student.

InterACTive Read Aloud – Implementing aspects Total Physical Response for the Emergent Bilingual

Peyton King (USA)

Language: English

Combining the power of the interactive read aloud (Hoyt, 2006) and Total Physical Response (Asher, ) created an amplified strategy breakthrough for a third grade Chinese newcomer. Choosing vocabulary from authentic children’s literature to enact prior to the reading made the language of the story comprehensible while pictures provided additional visual support. This strategy will be described and demonstrated with examples of the transfer and application of newly acquired vocabulary.

Emergent Bilingual Support Physical mouth cueing to support alphabetic language acquisition

Jessica Fisher (USA)

Language: English

The development of meaning is vital for retention and understanding when learning a new language, but the physical pronunciation of a new language also takes practice. For students whose first language is tonal rather than phonemic, this transition is challenging. With physical cueing systems (Mauszycki & Wambaugh, 2011) used by speech and language therapists, English language learners are able to isolate the technical components of the pronunciation of sounds while creating a physical reminder of how those sounds are produced. This increases a student’s success with word study leading to more fluent reading, stronger vocabulary and overall comprehension of the language itself.

Wordless Picture Book Mashups: Developing Reading Material with Sophisticated Vocabulary for an Emergent Bilingual 5th Grader

Alex Akers (USA)

Language: English

While working and developing lesson plans for an Emergent Bilingual Chinese 5th grader in a tutorial setting, wordless picture books were used as a catalyst for language development and personalized reading material. After completing a picture walk and engaging in dialogue about the setting, characters, and plot of the illustrated story, the tutee and tutor would negotiate language that was more sophisticated and complex than his initial assessed English reading level. The tutor wrote out the dictated story of her tutee and used digital publishing app to create a student created text with this enhanced vocabulary. Post assessment data showed remarkable gains in reading achievement.

Mobile Technology as Amplified and Transformational Support for Emergent Bilinguals

Sheri Vasinda, Jessica Fisher, Alex Akers and Peyton King (USA)

Language: English

When considering technology integration to enhance student learning, two frameworks were used for both planning and evaluating technology usage: The TPACK model (Mishra & Koehler, 2006) and the RAT model (Hughes, Thomas, & Sharber, 2006)Using the Replacement, Amplify, and Transformation (Hughes, Thomas, & Sharber, 2006). Preservice teachers discovered both the thrill of amplified and transformed practices and student results with some tension of hyper-engagement with iPads. Ways in which technology supported traditional strategies to create new learning opportunities will be shared with specific examples and student work samples.

Discussants:

  • SARA ANN BEACH, University of Oklahoma (USA)
  • BARBARA BAYLESS, University of Oklahoma (USA)
  • ELIZABETH WILLNER, Oklahoma City University (USA)
  • JULIE COLLINS, University of Central Oklahoma (USA)

Roundtable Chair: SARA ANN BEACH

Presentation: TAMARA ALÍA PRIETO, Spanish Reading and Writing Association

Language: English

Location: Aula 2532 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)


As what counts as proficient reading and writing has changed in the 21st Century, so too must what teacher candidates learn as they prepare to teach reading and writing in 21st century classrooms at all levels. This symposium will address theory, research, and teaching of New Literacies in teacher preparation that support literacy proficiency of all learners. The symposium will begin with a brief activity to activate background knowledge. After presenters summarize current theory and/or research on their topics, the symposium will conclude with questions and discussion.

What are theoretical perspectives on New Literacies?

Barbara Bayless

Language: English

What counts as literacy proficiency continually evolves as scholars expand their perspectives and new perspectives emerge. This presentation will discuss theoretical perspectives that underlie New Literacies for New Times. These theories, both social and literacy theories, include Sociocultural Theory, Critical Theory, Multiliteracies Theory, and the Dual-Level Theory of New Literacies.

What do teacher candidates know and believe about New Literacies in classroom practice?

Staci Vollmer

Language: English

Teacher preparation programs provide an avenue for a shift in teacher candidates’ thinking to occur about how literacy is viewed in schools. This presentation will discuss a research study of teacher candidates’ knowledge of and beliefs about New Literacies and how to integrate them into classroom practices. Data will also include candidates’ views of how they are learning about New Literacies and their integration. Suggestions for teacher educators will be discussed.

How can we teach communication and collaboration as essential New Literacies skills?

Elizabeth Willner

Language: English

Teacher candidates come to us with many New Literacy skills but they do not usually have a clear vision of how to integrate these literacies effectively into their teaching. This presentation will illustrate how teacher candidates participated in collaborative author studies based on Leu’s Internet Reciprocal Teaching model. Candidates then transferred their learning into work with 9-11 year olds by conducting small group author studies using this model. An analysis of the process will be discussed.

How can we support critical thinking and evaluation of digital texts?

Julie Collins

Language: English

Critical thinking is crucial when learning to utilize New Literacies. Digital texts present options through which readers must navigate in order to fully understand what they are reading. This presentation will share research which suggests that instruction about critical evaluation of digital texts is necessary to prepare learners for current and future literacy demands. Ideas for including these strategies in teacher education coursework will be shared and discussed.

How can we expand the repertoire of texts in classrooms to include New Literacies in classrooms?

Sara Ann Beach

Language: English

Teacher candidates come to preparation programs with a wide knowledge of the texts (such as classic literature or disciplinary textbooks) that have been privileged in classrooms. Today’s students, however, have been exposed to a multiplicity of texts in digital spaces such as websites, social media, blogs, and gaming. This presentation will illustrate how teacher educators can expand the repertoire of texts used in their university coursework to support teacher candidates’ learning about how to fully integrate appropriate digital texts into ethical classroom practice.

Discussants:

  • JIM ANDERSON, University of British Columbia (CANADA)
  • GINA DOMENICONI, Schweizerisches Institut für Kinder-und Jugendmedien (SWITZERLAND)
  • GABRIELE RABKIN, Universität Hamburg (GERMANY)
  • ANN ANDERSON, University of British Columbia (CANADA)
  • NICOLA FRIEDRICH, University of Toronto (CANADA)
  • LAURA TEICHERT, University of British Columbia (CANADA)
  • DIETER ISLER,  Pädagogische Hochschule Thurgau (SWITZERLAND)

Symposium Chair: ANN ANDERSON

Presentation: ELENA BERMEJO GONZÁLEZ, University Complutense of Madrid

Language: English

Location: Aula 2533 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)


Naturalistic studies over the past three decades have documented how families can be rich sites for children’s literacy development (e.g., Gregory, 2005; Heath, 1983; Prinsloo & Breier, 2013). Attempting to capitalize on this knowledge, educators have developed family literacy programs that aim to enhance and support children’s literacy learning. There is converging evidence that family literacy programs “work” in enhancing young children’s literacy learning, and have other positive impacts (e.g., Brooks, Pahl, Pollard, & Rees, 2008; van Steensel, McElvaney, Kurvers, & Herppich, 2011). However, these programs have been subject to powerful critiques with claims that they tend to promote the dominant language (e.g., English; German) at the expense of home languages and ignore the home literacy practices of families while promoting school literacy and middle class practices and values (Auerbach,, 1995; Reyes & Torres, 2007). In response, educators have developed programs that employ and promote families’ first languages and home literacies. The three papers in this symposium report on such family literacy programs with immigrant and refugee families in Canada, Germany and Switzerland.

Presentation 1

Jim Anderson and Ann Anderson (CANADA) 

Language: English

Will report on a three year study of a bilingual family literacy program with 500+ immigrant and refugee families involving four language groups in a metropolitan area of Canada. Findings indicate that the 4 and 5 year old children made significant gains in early literacy in English; the parents valued the bilingual nature of the program and identified benefits of first language maintenance; and appreciated learning about schooling and pedagogy in their new countries. However, there were issues in maintaining fidelity to the program’s intent of promoting bilingualism and recognizing and promoting the home literacy practices of the families, and sustainability of the program.

Presentation 2

Gina Domeniconi (GERMANY)

Language: English

Will report on the family literacy programme, “Tell me a story” in Switzerland that reaches out to families with migrant backgrounds in an effort to improve the language and literacy development of children in their first language. In storytelling sessions, facilitators focus on raising parents’ awareness the importance of telling stories, singing, and playing with words and rhymes in the language they speak best. The paper focuses on the results of interviews with parents and language facilitators, which were conducted as part of an academic monitoring of the programme by the Marie Meierhofer Institute for the Child (MMI). The results of the interviews show that the storytelling sessions have positive effects on the children’s language and literacy development. The target group developed a very positive attitude towards literacy activities, which they integrated in their daily life.

Presentation 3

Gabriele Rabkin (GERMANY)

Language: English

Will report on the Family Literacy project (FLY) in Hamburg, Germany. Starting in 2004 at nine schools; today, more than 70 schools are involved. FLY aims to build bridges between preschools, schools and families by actively involving parents and other family members in children’s literacy education. The three main pillars of FLY are: (1) parents’ participation in their children’s classes; (2) special sessions just for parents; and (3) joint out-of-school activities for teachers, parents and children. These three pillars help support migrant families, in particular, to develop a better understanding of German schools and play a more active role in school life. The author will present the findings of a recent study on the impact of FLY. The study assessed whether the project had succeeded in achieving its intermediate objectives, namely to promote parents’ active involvement in classes; to keep parents better informed about their children’s learning; and to encourage parents to engage in out-of-school literacy activities with their children.

Conclusion

Language: English

Given the unprecedented transnational movement of people, and the desire of educators and policy makers to support migrant families in ethical and equitable ways, the symposium should prove to be timely and significant. Dieter Isler will conclude the symposium by discussing common themes across the paper, lingering concerns and issues, and implication of the findings for policy, practice and research.

Discussants:

1) EXPEDITA SÁNCHEZ SÁNCHEZ, Servicio de Innovación Educativa de la Consejería de Educación y Universidades del Gobierno de Canarias (SPAIN)

Red BIBESCAN, comunidad de prácticas letradas escolares de Canarias


2) MARÍA DEL PINO GALVÁN

     MIGUEL LORENZO MARTÍN RAMOS

     ALEJANDRO MOLINA RIVERO

Servicio de Innovación de Consejería de Educación y Universidades del Gobierno de Canarias (SPAIN)

Congreso de Jóvenes Lectores de Canarias: una comunidad de lectores y creadores


3) MANUEL ABRIL VILLALBA, University of La Laguna (SPAIN)

Tres Proyectos de Investigación e Innovación en lectura y escritura: “Soñando entre cuentos”, “Leer en familia” y “Taller de Escritura Creativa”


Presentation: MARÍA TERESA ACOSTA TEJERA, Dirección de la Agencia Canaria de Calidad Universitaria y Evaluación Educativa y del Servicio de Innovación Educativa de la Consejería de Educación-Gobierno de Canarias (SPAIN)

Language: Spanish

Location: Sala de Grado (third floor, main entrance, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)


Red BIBESCAN, comunidad de prácticas letradas escolares de Canarias

Expedita Sánchez Sánchez (SPAIN)

Language: Spanish

La Red virtual de Bibliotecas Escolares de Canarias (Red BIBESCAN) se crea en el año 2012 en la Consejería de Educación del Gobierno de Canarias como red educativa institucional. Su objetivo principal se centra en el impulso de crear una comunidad de práctica en la que el profesorado de los centros docentes públicos de todas las etapas educativas de la Comunidad de Canarias intercambie sus prácticas en torno a la lectura, la escritura, la oralidad, la competencia informacional y la dinamización de las Bibliotecas Escolares, además de promover la reflexión en torno a la competencia comunicativa en los centros educativos. A lo largo de los cuatro años de vida de la Red se ha ido modificando su estructura y funcionamiento para atender la demanda de los centros aunque sigue siendo una Red eminentemente virtual dado el carácter fragmentario del territorio insular canario. Dentro de la plataforma virtual, el profesorado de los centros participantes, además de compartir prácticas escolares de diferentes experiencias, recursos y actividades que enriquecen la Red relacionadas con los días señalados de celebración (24 de octubre, día de la Biblioteca; 25 de noviembre, Día de la Eliminación de la Violencia de Género; Día de la Paz; 8 de marzo, día de la Mujer, etc.), se agrupa en foros específicos en torno a proyectos diseñados desde sus centros. Estas propuestas didácticas de trabajo de lectura (tanto de fomento de la lectura como de competencia lectora), de escritura, de oralidad o uso de la Biblioteca Escolar son mucho más elaboradas; se realizan a lo largo del curso escolar de forma colaborativa y forman, lógicamente, parte de la vida del centro. Todas estas contribuciones permiten que la Red se mantenga viva y actualizada constantemente.


Congreso de Jóvenes Lectores de Canarias: una comunidad de lectores y creadores

María del Pino Galván, Miguel Lorenzo Martín Ramos and Alejandro Molina Rivero (SPAIN)

Language: Spanish

El curso escolar 2011-2012 la Consejería de Educación, del Gobierno de Canarias pone en marcha el Congreso de Jóvenes Lectores de Gran Canaria con el objetivo de crear y afianzar en el alumnado el hábito lector como instrumento básico de desarrollo y de madurez. En un principio, estaba dirigido al alumnado de Enseñanza Secundaria de la isla pero, progresivamente se ha ampliado la participación a Educación Primaria, Bachillerato y FP. Asimismo, el Congreso, que nació en Gran Canaria, se ha ido extendiendo; primero, a las islas de la provincia de Las Palmas y luego, a las de Tenerife, celebrándose el presente curso escolar en cada una de las siete islas, con el nombre de Congreso de Jóvenes Lectores de Canarias. El Congreso persigue afianzar en el alumnado la mejora de la competencia lectora en contextos reales como instrumento básico de desarrollo y madurez, a través de la lectura en todas sus dimensiones. Con ello, se pretende estimular la sensibilidad literaria del alumnado como fuente de placer y enriquecimiento personal y partir del gusto por la lectura para evolucionar hacia el establecimiento de hábitos lectores y el progreso en competencia literaria. La dinámica de funcionamiento del Congreso es totalmente diferente al de otros eventos similares: los autores invitados son los espectadores y los alumnos y alumnas, los protagonistas, a través de la interpretación de la obra leída. Para ello, realizan creaciones en diversos formatos, desde presentaciones digitales, representaciones teatrales, entrevistas, blogs, etc. hasta cortos. El intercambio que se produce entre el alumnado de los centros que han trabajado a un mismo autor o autora y este produce momentos mágicos que hacen que, edición tras edición, el número de asistentes aumente y repitan los centros que ya han participado.


Tres Proyectos de Investigación e Innovación en lectura y escritura: “Soñando entre cuentos”, “Leer en familia” y “Taller de Escritura Creativa”

Manuel Abril Villalba (SPAIN)

Language: Spanish

La lectura y la escritura son instrumentos que consolidan la creación, la aplicación y la organización del pensamiento. Se describen a continuación tres proyectos de innovación para activar y consolidar sus efectos. Proyecto 1: “Soñando entre cuentos”: Los chicos (niños y adolescentes) hospitalizados en la sección de Pediatría en el Hospital Universitario de Canarias (HUC, en Tenerife, Islas Canarias) cuentan con esta actividad que se realiza todos los miércoles por la tarde desde hace dos años. El proyecto pretende favorecer la educación literaria por medio de la lectura en voz alta. Y ser un paliativo al dolor. La Asociación Veredas lo viene haciendo posible. Proyecto 2: “Leer en familia” (Crear un ambiente íntimo de diálogo en torno a los textos literarios): El proyecto ofrece a las familias realizar la lectura en voz alta con sus hijos, para favorecer el acceso a la lectura literaria y propiciar el diálogo y la conversación. Está organizado por el CEP de La Laguna y el Gobierno de Canarias, en colaboración con el profesor Abril. Proyecto 3: “Taller de escritura creativa”: La EUPAM (Estudios Universitarios para Adultos y Mayores) de la Universidad de La Laguna ofrece tres nuevos Diplomas Universitarios a personas mayores de 45 años y adultos (jubilados). En el Diploma de Arte y Creatividad fue aprobado el proyecto presentado por el profesor Abril Villalba denominado “Escritura creativa (Taller)” para el primer año del diploma.

Discussants:

  • BIENVENIDA SÁNCHEZ ALBA, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (SPAIN)
  • GLORIANA HERNANZ, Madrid con dislexia (SPAIN)
  • ALFONSO CORONADO MARÍN, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (SPAIN)
  • ELISA RUIZ VEERMAN, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (SPAIN)

Roundtable Chair: BIENVENIDA SÁNCHEZ ALBA 

Presentation: PALOMA GARCÍA DEL CARRIZO MANGLANO, CRA-Centro Rural Agrupado “Sierra Oeste” (SPAIN)

Language: Spanish

Location: Aula 2534 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)


Dislexia quiere decir desorden para leer. Se la ha llamado también “problema específico para la lectura” (specific reading disability). Estas calificaciones hacen referencia a la dificultad que tienen niños/as, adolescentes y adultos/as para leer que va siempre asociada a dificultad para escribir. Todas las teorías en torno a la dislexia: genéticas, neurológicas, sensoriales, pedagógicas y psicológicas coinciden en abordarla como un problema que incide directamente en la calidad de vida de las personas que conviven con ella. La dislexia es una de las más, si no la más, común dificultad de aprendizaje se estima que afecta al 10% de la población, unos 700 millones de personas en el mundo y, así mismo, una de las menos visibles. El objetivo de este simposio es triple, en primer lugar hacer visible la dislexia y dignificar su/s manera/s diferente/s de leer el mundo. En segundo lugar, mostrar la situación de los estudiantes y personas con dislexia desde la mirada de: la neuropedagogía, la educación superior, la experiencia personal y la vivencia familiar. Y con todo ello, en tercer y último lugar, saber cómo abordar las necesidades educativas formales e informales que permitan la intervención educativa y socio familiar. Una intervención que no considere a la dislexia como un correlato de carencias, si no como un aprendizaje sobre la compensación que permite desarrollar a la persona disléxica una diversidad de herramientas propias: pedagógicas, psicológicas, emocionales, motrices, espaciales y sociales para orientarse en el mundo. Una intervención que pueda empoderar a quienes conviven con la dislexia como filolectores y gozosos de sus escritos. Tal es el caso de Jhon Irving, disléxico confeso.

C Parallel sessions (Tuesday, 4 July – from 4.15 p.m. to 5.30 p.m.): ORAL PRESENTATIONS

Location: Aula 3202 (third floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)

Presentation: AELE Team

Language: English


Comparing Children’s Responses to Postmodern and Traditional Picturebooks: Pictures, Texts and Temporal-Spatial Reading Paths

Mustafa Ulusoy, Gazi University (TURKEY) and Dilek Altun, Ahi Evran University (TURKEY)

Language: English

Children are  exposed to “techno-literacy” environments in their daily lives .  New literacy presents children hypertexts, nonlinear story line, evocative graphics, multiple perspectives and the mixing of genres. Postmodern picture books are creative ways of using visuals to multilayered intertextuality for children(Anstey & Bull, 2004; Dreasing, 2008; Gunder, 2001; Lewis, 2001).Van Meerbergen (2016) pointed out that aesthetic features  of postmodern picture books’, multilayer text structure and the combinations of temporal-spatial reading paths can be a source for children’s cognitive and interactive learning. . This study investigated children’s meaning making processes and reading responses to different types of picture books by investigating their oral, visual and nonverbal responses to capture their emotional, cognitive and aesthetic responses and understandings. The study was a phenomenological research and conducted with 4th grade children (n=10). The data was collected by using two traditional picture books: Frederick and Kırmızı Elma [The Red Apple]. The books were selected among national and international popular awarded books. Voices in the Park and The Tunnel were used as postmodern books. There were two stages of the data collection process. First, each book was read in whole group book reading time and then children had time to examine and read the books individually. The order of the books to be read was randomized.The children constituted their oral and visual narratives individually and their oral explanations were audio/video recorded. The visual narratives and responses will be examined under the two main dimensions: story elements and processes, and artistic, aesthetic and imaginative responses.


Teaching L2 reading and writing: Bridging the gap between affluent and poor schools en early childhood education

Annalene van Staden, University of the Free State (SOUTH AFRICA) and Fransisca Serrano, Universidad de Granada (SPAIN)

Language: English

Research affirms the importance of early childhood language input and emergent literacy skills development, as well as long-term effects of effective literacy development, irrespective of the language to be acquired and the literacy development, in either L1 or L2. Drawing from the seminal work of social constructivist learning theorists such as Vygotsky and Bruner, this paper argues for the role and interplay of both extrinsic and intrinsic factors affecting adequate language exposure and literacy development during the initial schooling (aka early literacy phase) in both the L1 and the second language to be learned. In addition, we also draw on the ecological systems theory such as Bronfenbrenner, illustrating the important interplay of both intrinsic and extrinsic factors in the language and literacy development of both L1 and L2 learners. Realising the important role and input of teachers in establishing a sound L1 and L2 development (for example, in English), the current paper explores the challenges of teachers, teaching English as a second language at early childhood settings in South Africa (n = 10) and Spain (n = 10). Reviewing both countries data , it is evident that learners from rural areas have numerous challenges in acquiring the sufficient levels of literacy in both L1 and L2. Also availability of resources in L1 and L2, including teachers’ perceptions of challenges contributing to both L1 and L2 literacy development is discussed. Recommendations to improve reading and writing (in both L1 and L2) in an attempt to bridge the gap between affluent and poorer schools will be provided.


An Exploration of How Play, Role-Play, and Drama May Contribute to Adolescent Literacy Development

Jennifer Lindenauer, George Mason University (USA)

Language: English / Spanish

If play acts as an important context for young children (Paley, 2004) then could it also be equally important for adolescent leaners? Is play a context that can link in and out-of-school literacies for adolescent learners? Is play a context for adolescents to construct and uncover or make visible their unique literacy identities? Moje, Stockdill, Kim & Kim (2011) posit that adolescents’ out-of-school literacy identities may be influential in supporting adolescents’ development of literacy identities in disciplines such as math and the sciences. Moreover, new literacies studies assert that literacy is a set of socially constructed practices (Gee, 1990; Street, 1984) that require attention to youth identities. If identity shapes literacy practices then exploration related to play as a context to support the development of adolescent literacy identities seems an important endeavor. Early childhood literacy development recognizes the creation of third space (Dyson, 2003) as an important aspect of literacy development. Third space can serve as both an intersubjective space, a space where children define themselves as part of a group, and space for children to bring themselves and their home culture to school and mix the two. Perhaps play is just open enough, just creative enough to serve as the milieu, the third space, where shifting literacy identity development can flourish in the school environment. Through play it may be possible for adolescents to understand their out-of-school literacy identities and how these identities mix with school sanctioned literacies identities (Medina & Campano, 2006). I will share the results of this exploratory literature review which revealed that there do exist some parallels between young children’s and adolescents use of play, role-play and dramatic play and that play contexts may be beneficial for adolescents’ literacy learning in a range of international settings.


On Diacritics

Dennis Kurzon, University of Haifa (ISRAEL)

Language: English

Diacritics — signs found in many languages written in the Latin script and in several other scripts, too, placed above or below a letter — function normally as a means of extending the writing system to cover the phonemes of the particular language without adding to the number of separate letters, thus enabling readers to translate, as it were, the written text into the spoken language. Examples include the diaresis or umlaut, as in <ö> (= /ø/) in German and Scandinavian languages, the grave versus the acute accent in French to indicate the difference between /ԑ/ and /e/ respectively, the caron or háček in Czech to change the pronunciation of the letter /ts/ to <č> /tʃ/, and the ogonek in Polish to indicate a nasalized vowel, e.g. <ę> = /ɛ̃/. However, in some instances, the diacritic may function on the lexical or even on the historical level. The diacritic functioning on the lexical level is used to distinguish a word from a word without a diacritic, i.e. the two words would be homonyms if they were not distinguished, aiding the reader in understanding the written text. In French we find the pairs a and à (“has”/”to”) or ou and où (“or”/”where”). As regards the historical level, we find in French, too, the circumflex (as in <ê>), which indicates the deletion of a sound or letter, usually <s>, as a result of diachronic development, e.g. Latin esse à Vulgar Latin essere à French être “to be”.


Pillar or pliers? How two BFFs negotiate the authority of privilege

Suki Mozenter, Stanford University (USA)

Language: English

When students come together to read and talk about books, it is an opportunity to collaborate in a way that supports their positive identity as authoritative readers. In the United States, this may be more likely to occur for students who are identified as white, of higher socioeconomic status, or of higher English proficiency. When these students engage with students who may be perceived to be different – in terms of ethnicity, class, or English proficiency – there is a risk that the collaboration will become inequitable. As schools and teachers strive to improve literacy and educational outcomes for all children, it is important to understand how to support student collaborations that create opportunities for all students to positively identify as authoritative readers. This paper examines one literacy-based conversation between two ethnically and linguistically different students. Zoey, a white and monolingual-English third grader, repeatedly corrects Kat, her Filipina and bilingual (Tagalog and English) classmate, as she reads aloud. However, Kat ignores and deflects the corrections. Zoey responds by softening her assertions of authority, inviting Kat to provide her literary interpretations. As they read and interpret the text together, both students assert their own authority and attend to their partner’s responses to these assertions. I propose that this is a case of two linguistically and ethnically different students who negotiate the authority of privilege in a way that positively supports the textual authority and literary identity of both students, providing insight into the ebb and flow of authority negotiations in literacy discussions.

Location: Room 0203  (ground floor)

Presentation: AELE Team

Language: Spanish


Continuidad y éxito educativo de alumnado inmigrante: papel de la lengua escolar

Catalina Barragán Vicaria, Universidad de Almería (SPAIN)

Language: Spanish

Este trabajo muestra el papel de la lengua escolar en las trayectorias de continuidad y éxito educativo en los chicos y chicas inmigrantes de primera generación. Para ello partimos de un estudio cualitativo realizado en Almería (España) en el que participaron treinta y seis jóvenes que estaban en etapas educativas postobligatorias o las había concluido ya, de los cuales veintiocho tenían una lengua familiar distinta a la escolar por su país de procedencia (Marruecos. Rumanía, Ucrania, Rusia, Pakistán y Guinea-Bissau). Se utilizó la entrevista abierta como técnica principal. La recogida de datos se completó con entrevistas a docentes especialmente significativos en su recorrido escolar y a otros profesionales de la educación. Entre los resultados se pueden destacar, por un lado, la relevancia que adquiere la nueva lengua para estos jóvenes ante la necesidad de comunicación. Y por otro lado, su papel fundamental en los aprendizajes escolares y las ayudas recibidas en horario escolar y extraescolar, la necesidad de aprender la lengua junto con los contenidos curriculares, trascendiendo los aspectos organizativos y técnicos de la enseñanza. Las principales conclusiones apuntan hacia la angustia de estos chicos y chicas en los primeros momentos de su llegada al nuevo país, el esfuerzo realizado para aprender la nueva lengua y la necesidad de apoyo para este aprendizaje en las distintas áreas del currículo y más allá del horario escolar. Asimismo, muestran como las dificultades lingüísticas por desconocimiento de la lengua de instrucción no han sido un impedimento para alcanzar el éxito educativo independientemente de la lengua materna hablada. Ofrece, además, una variabilidad en las trayectorias educativas de los sujetos, intra e intergrupales, que rompe con los estereotipos sobre el aprendizaje y las expectativas que se tienen a nivel social y desde la educación en función del país origen o cultura.


La participación ciudadana desde la acción formativa en la Universidad Piloto de Colombia

Luz Ariana Galvis Ardila, Universidad Piloto de Colombia (COLOMBIA)

Language: Spanish

La participación ciudadana es un tema que se repite en la mayoría de proyectos educativos institucionales universitarios en virtud de una acción formativa integral. Sin embargo, la simple cátedra en esta materia es insuficiente para promover un auténtico espíritu de ciudadanía activa, más aun, cuando los saberes específicos de las distintas ciencias centran la atención en los pensum académicos. La intención en la universidad Piloto de Colombia (UPC), desde la asignatura de Ética y Ciudadanía, es que los estudiantes asuman sus profesiones y se piensen a sí mismos dentro de en un diálogo constante con la realidad de su proceso histórico, así como desde aquello que Cortina (2008, p.p. 23) llama ‘bienes internos’, es decir, bajo la premisa de que toda profesión existe para proporcionar algo en particular a la vida en sociedad, en contraposición de los bienes externos: secundarios y consecuentes del ejercicio del bien interno como la riqueza, la fama, el prestigio, etc. Durante el año 2016 en la UPC se llevó a cabo un ejercicio de ciudadanía activa desde tres enfoques de aprendizaje: la transversalidad de los saberes, el aprendizaje significativo como lo propone Ausubel, y el enfoque Histórico-Cultural de Vigotsky, donde el desarrollo individual se encuentra atravesado por un alto componente cultural de carácter socio-histórico, con dinámicas compartidas. A partir de esto, el estudiante primeramente analizó los aspectos problemáticos de la realidad desde elementos críticos para posteriormente asumir una posición propositiva ante ellos, mediada por la responsabilidad en el sentido de hacerse cargo de la resolución de problemas. Bajo esta dinámica y bajo el acontecer de los sucesos históricos que ocupan a nuestro país, como lo es proceso de paz en Colombia, los estudiantes debieron ir más allá de la reflexión de los conceptos y aplicarlos en planes concretos de acción, en orden a solucionar o mitigar los impactos de la guerra sobre las distintas poblaciones y sus necesidades particulares.


Formación y transformación de maestros de lenguaje en el marco de una red académica. Experiencias de la red de docentes de lenguaje de Córdoba

Rudy del Cristo Doria Correa, Universidad de Córdoba (COLOMBIA)

Language: Spanish

La participación ciudadana es un tema que se repite en la mayoría de proyectos educativos institucionales universitarios en virtud de una acción formativa integral. Sin embargo, la simple cátedra en esta materia es insuficiente para promover un auténtico espíritu de ciudadanía activa, más aun, cuando los saberes específicos de las distintas ciencias centran la atención en los pensum académicos. La intención en la universidad Piloto de Colombia (UPC), desde la asignatura de Ética y Ciudadanía, es que los estudiantes asuman sus profesiones y se piensen a sí mismos dentro de en un diálogo constante con la realidad de su proceso histórico, así como desde aquello que Cortina (2008, p.p. 23) llama ‘bienes internos’, es decir, bajo la premisa de que toda profesión existe para proporcionar algo en particular a la vida en sociedad, en contraposición de los bienes externos: secundarios y consecuentes del ejercicio del bien interno como la riqueza, la fama, el prestigio, etc. Durante el año 2016 en la UPC se llevó a cabo un ejercicio de ciudadanía activa desde tres enfoques de aprendizaje: la transversalidad de los saberes, el aprendizaje significativo como lo propone Ausubel, y el enfoque Histórico-Cultural de Vigotsky, donde el desarrollo individual se encuentra atravesado por un alto componente cultural de carácter socio-histórico, con dinámicas compartidas. A partir de esto, el estudiante primeramente analizó los aspectos problemáticos de la realidad desde elementos críticos para posteriormente asumir una posición propositiva ante ellos, mediada por la responsabilidad en el sentido de hacerse cargo de la resolución de problemas. Bajo esta dinámica y bajo el acontecer de los sucesos históricos que ocupan a nuestro país, como lo es proceso de paz en Colombia, los estudiantes debieron ir más allá de la reflexión de los conceptos y aplicarlos en planes concretos de acción, en orden a solucionar o mitigar los impactos de la guerra sobre las distintas poblaciones y sus necesidades particulares.


Experiencia en Bilingüismo

Cristina Andrea Bugnano, Escuela Normal Superior Nº 10 (ARGENTINA)

Language: Spanish

Soy la Regente del Nivel Primario de la ENS Nº 10 en Belgrano. Por la cercanía al Barrio Chino,  niños de la comunidad concurren a nuestra escuela. Llegan chicos desde China, y sus familias los inscriben al día siguiente en la escuela. Siempre se puede hacer algo, hasta en la situación más adversa, siempre podemos modificar la realidad de alguna manera… Nos propusimos algo innovador: “¿y si tuviéramos clases de chino en la escuela?” Todo nuevo proyecto genera posibilidades, ganas de enfrentar nuevos desafíos, temores y resistencias… Muchas horas de reuniones en el Ministerio de Educación. Nace la Resolución. Un Proyecto de Intensificación de idiomas, en una escuela pública de la ciudad de Buenos Aires, para ofrecer igualdad de oportunidades a los estudiantes. Con extensión horaria y cinco horas semanales de chino mandarín para hispano parlantes y sino parlantes. Hay situaciones a resolver? Si, por ejemplo, enviar las comunicaciones en ambos idiomas. Es tarea para comprometerse, para buscar acuerdos, para abrirse a tender redes… Un trabajo arduo, donde se involucran los conocimientos, la apertura, saberes algunos que no son pedagógicos pero necesarios al momento de dar continuidad a un proyecto de tanta envergadura. Es un gran aprendizaje conocer al otro, valorar su otredad y buscar la forma de incluir respetando la singularidad. Sin imponerle lo propio como lo valedero, en detrimento de sus propias raíces… Abrirnos a ese aprendizaje, ponernos su lugar para intentar comprender lo que puede estar sintiendo cuando expresa tanto con una mirada, con unos ojitos que quieren expresar algo que no se puede entender a primera intención, porque el idioma es diferente y la palabra no está presente para acompañar ese gesto… Y querer entender lo que quiere decir, y no poder… Todos necesitamos ser escuchados, ser comprendidos, comunicarnos y sentirnos incluidos…


Relación de la fluidez de la escritura con la cantidad y calidad de textos multilingües de alumnos de primaria

Irune Ibarra Lizundia, Universidad del País Vasco (SPAIN)

Language: Spanish

Según los estudios realizados desde el marco neuro-evolutivo de la escritura, la velocidad de la escritura condiciona la cantidad y calidad de la generación de textos hasta los 16 años, esto es, los alumnos que escriben una gran cantidad de letras por minuto han escrito textos significativamente más largos y de una mayor coherencia   (Berninger & Swanson, 1994; Berninger & Graham, 1998). Por otro lado, se sabe que la velocidad de las letras aumenta curso tras curso, por lo menos hasta 2º de la E.S.O. En esta comunicación primero se van a explicar los estudios que se encuentran en el marco neuro-evolutivo de la escritura y después se resumirá el estudio realizado con 556 alumnos de 2º, 4º y 6º de primaria con textos multilingües en el País Vasco.

Location: Aula 3401 (third floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)

Presentation: AELE Team

Language: English


Scaffolding Literacy in Municipality Schools in Stockholm: Literacy Boost

Anna-Maija Norberg, Anna Lena Ebenståhl and Kristina Ansaldo, Education administration (SWEDEN)

Language: English

Statistics from international studies (Pirls 2011, Pisa 2012) show that Swedish pupils’ reading skills keep getting weaker over time. On behalf of the government The Swedish national agency for education carries out an initiative called Literacy Boost which is an in-service training for teachers at all levels and in all subjects to develop pupils’ literacy skills (both reading and writing). The focus is on the significance of instruction and the teachers’ pedagogical content knowledge, and the goal is to improve instruction by developing the teachers’ collaborative learning. Supervisors get an eight-day-education consisting of training in tutoring and of lectures on research informed literacy instruction. The responsibility for the Literacy boost is shared by three levels. The national level, i.e. the national agency in cooperation with different universities, produces materials to be published on the literacy portal (www.lasochskrivportalen.se) and the national agency also distributes government grants to participating schools. The local level, i.e. the responsible authorities in municipalities or the organizers of free schools, decide on organizational matters and submit application to government grants. At the school level, head teachers/principals decide on organizational matters such as allocation of time and resources, while participating teachers and supervisors work together in collaborative groups, using the material on the literacy portal, aiming to improve their teaching. In the presentation we will bring forward a project called The Literacy Boost Stockholm and thus discuss the supporting structures that the municipality of Stockholm offers to participating schools, aiming to secure a long term approach to Literacy boost in the municipality schools, even though the government grant is submitted for one year only. In our presentation we also include the model for evaluation and research on the impacts of the project.


The First Minister’s Reading Challenge: combining intrinsic and extrinsic motivations to read

Marc Lambert, Scottish Book Trust (UNITED KINGDOM)

Language: English

Scottish Book Trust, on behalf of the Scottish Government, is delivering an exciting new reading initiative for children in Primary 4 – 7: The First Minister’s Reading Challenge. We believe that reading has the power to change lives, and developing a love of reading in childhood can have a huge impact on educational attainment and future wellbeing. The First Minister wants to make sure every child in Scotland has an equal opportunity to experience the huge benefits that reading for pleasure brings. The FMRC aims to build on the work already taking place in schools across the country to encourage children to read widely, explore a range of books and develop a love of reading. The main focus of the Challenge is to encourage reading for pleasure and support schools, libraries and communities to build reading cultures. Children in P4-P7 in every school in Scotland are invited to take part in the Challenge. On the new Reading Challenge website, schools can order Reading Passports that pupils can use to log their reading journeys. They can also register classes to take part in the challenges and find book suggestions, learning resources and ideas to encourage young people to develop a love of reading. There will be a range of prizes awarded in June 2017 for schools and pupils to celebrate their reading journeys. The Challenge will also give the opportunity for every child’s personal achievements to be recognised by their teachers and librarians. In addition, the Inspiring Classrooms fund will help schools build and sustain a reading culture, allowing schools to apply to receive a small grant for a project of their choice. This includes an author visit and books for Primary 4 – 7 children taking part. The FMRC was launched September 1st 2016. 70% of Primary Schools have already signed up.


Reading for life: A presentation of an ongoing process the aim of which is to promote reading interest amongst boys

Elspeth Randelin, Mariehamns stad: Ytternäs Primary school (FINLAND)

Language: English

The project “Lifelong reading” emerged as a possible solution to a problem. The “problem” is the difference between girls ‘and boys’ reading habits and their appetite for reading Boys are, quite simply, not as hungry to read as our girls. After the PISA surveys in 2000 and 2004, we took the difference as a fact and worked accordingly. The goal is to reduce the gender gap in reading to zero and thereby ensure that all children, regardless of gender, have the opportunity to find the joy of reading. • The project’s basic assertions:• Boys are more difficult to find books to suit them. • Boys read within a more limited area. • Boys often choose nonfiction books with pictures instead of fiction. • Boys choose any books with male protagonists. • Girls are willing to try almost anything while boys choose books so that supply them become narrower. This is how it appeared in our school at the beginning of the autumn term 2004. Since then we have worked with a great many exciting activities and ideas to achieve our goals: The projects goals: That through reading, writing, discussion and reflection provide students with a rich and varied language. • providing reading for leisure legitimacy (through reading role models) so that all children – especially boys – to read more. • provide adults in children’s reading world with more insight into children’s literature and on how important reading aloud is for children’s language development.• achieve lasting, positive reading habits at school and at home and thereby lay the foundation for a lifetime of reading, Like many other projects based Lifelong Reading on cooperation – first and foremost, cooperation between home and school. Then the cooperation between teachers, school librarians and other school staff, or if there is a school librarian, with the municipal library, collaboration between libraries in the same areas, between authors and libraries and teachers. Last but certainly not least, is the cooperation from all sides with the children and of course the children. We all need to help each other with this.


The Impact of Book Gifting Programs: A Meta-Analysis

Ingrid Willenberg, Australian Catholic University (AUSTRALIA); Adriana Bus, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam (NETHERLANDS); and Merel de Bont, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam (NETHERLANDS)

Language: English

Shared book reading between parents and young children has been widely espoused as important for developing language and literacy, and promoting positive attitudes towards reading. Book gifting interventions – notably Reach Out and Read, Imagination Library and Book Start – involve relatively cost-effective strategies for promoting early literacy. Although evidence for the effectiveness of these programs exists, it has not been established precisely which program characteristics work under which conditions for whom. A meta-analysis of existing research will therefore contribute further evidence on book gifting interventions to inform the design of future interventions. This presentation will address the findings for Reach Out and Read (ROR), a program widely implemented in the US, targeting children between 6 and 60 months of age during routine health care visits. The program includes 3 elements: (1) guidance to parents on the importance of reading aloud; (2) providing a developmentally appropriate children’s book; and (3) volunteers modeling effective reading aloud techniques. Our meta-analysis in progress addresses the following questions: 1. Do book-gifting programs have a positive short and/or medium term effects on the emergent literacy outcomes of children under 5? 2. Do book-gifting programs have a positive effect on parental literacy-promoting behaviours? 3. Are program effects moderated by sample characteristics, program characteristics and/or study characteristics?


Turning Students Over to Authors: A Sound Instructional Strategy for Increasing Reading Engagement and Achievement  

William Bintz and Sara Delano Moore, Kent State University (USA)

Language: English

The session was inspired by a famous quote from the internationally renowned reading theorist and educator, Frank Smith, who stated that “good reading instruction ultimately involves turning readers over to accomplished authors.” With this inspiration in mind, the purpose of this session is three-fold. One is to share the work of several internationally renowned authors who have published high-quality and award-winning literature. Each featured author has focused mostly on a specific genre, namely picture books, and a specific content area, e.g. English/Language Arts, Social Studies, Mathematics, and Science. For example, we will highlight the work of Mitsumasa Anno, Cindy Neuschwander, and David Schwarz for mathematics, Eve Bunting and Shaun Tan for social studies, Seynour Simon and Peter Sis for science, and Gary Crew for English/Language Arts. Two, it provides several research-based and classroom-tested instructional strategies that can be used with this literature to increase reading achievement and learning effectiveness across the curriculum. These strategies will include What’s the Big Idea?, Consensus Boards, and What’s Interesting vs. What’s Important? Three, as a culminating experience, we will engage session participants in a thoughtful reflection experience. The goal of this experience is to hear new voices and start new conversations around turning students over to authors across the curriculum as an act of theoretical sound instructional practice. In addition, we will invite participant questioning using such prompts as: How can literacy and reading educators encourage their disciplinary colleagues to use literature as a tool for learning across the curriculum? Ultimately, out goal will be to highlight the notion that turning readers over to accomplished authors, particularly authors of high-quality and award-winning literature, has many benefits. Most importantly, it helps students develop a positive disposition about reading and see reading as an enjoyable and satisfying tool for learning.

Location: Aula 3407 (third floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)

Presentation: AELE Team

Language: English


Reading and thinking about social equity, honesty and integrity. Insight into “Children and YoungAdults’ Jury” results in Latvia

Aija Kalve and Sandra Kalnina, University of Latvia (LATVIA)

Language: English

At present the topic of social equity, honesty and integrity, diversity and mutual understanding in the society is urgent in Latvia like in the whole world. It incites one to study from this point of view how social equity, honesty and integrity find their reflection in children and youth literature, and how the problems of integrity and mutual understanding with the peers, fitting in the environment and coherence with oneself are being solved. The best stories do not consider a reader as the person to be taught. They see the reader as an equal and serious peer whose ideas and independent opinions are fully appreciated. Thus it facilitates decision-making, formulating and expressing the personal opinion and evaluating critically the environment around them. These skills are very important for the contemporary youth living in the pluralistic world with different systems of values. It is also important to explore how books reflecting these problems are evaluated by the readers. Latvian readers’ opinion is visible in the results of the reading promotion program “Children and Young Adults’ Jury”. Every year best translations and books by Latvian authors are included in the program’s collections for 4 age groups. From the very beginning in 2001 the program works according to simple, easy-to-understand principles – step by step involving its participants into reading, discussing and evaluating different books that develop critical thinking along with reading and writing skills. For many years the program has been receiving a positive feedback from participants and literacy professionals.


Genre-based teaching and learning: An intervention study

Berit Lundgren, University of Dalarn (SWEDEN)

Language: English

Genre-based approaches to teaching writing are frequently used in literacy classrooms. Therefore the present study focused the Sydney School teaching and learning cycle, as described by Martin and Rose (2012), Martin and Rothery (1986) and interpreted by Kuyumcu (2013), examining its effectiveness in relation to the products of ten to twelve-year-olds’ written narratives in a primary school in Sweden. Three grades (4, 5, 6), (n=101) students, participated and were pre & post measured. In each grade one class was assigned to the intervention and the other to be a control group. And the elaborated factor is the “Joint construction” phase. Data shows that there is a positive development for the whole n=101 according to text length, amount of time related words and narrative competence. Furthermore, girls perform better than the boys in both pre- and post –measurement. Between experimental group and control group there is no significant difference. “Join construction” was in this research not a crucial phase for students’ written production. The outcome of the intervention group taking part in joint construction and the control group not working through joint construction was marginal. The results of this study seem to support similar findings in writing research claiming that there is no one construction of writing instruction, as, for example, “joint construction is the most powerful classroom practice currently available as far as learning written genres is concerned.” (Rose & Martin 2012: 73).


Educating literacy teachers with a social justice perspective and a critical multicultural approach: An experience

Marcia Lisbôa Costa de Oliveira, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (BRAZIL), and Lucia Helena Eletério, Universidade Estácio de Sá (BRAZIL)

Language: English

This presentation’s main goal is to discuss some results of a teacher training program focused on literacies that takes into account the sociocultural diversity in a transformative social justice perspective. Our theoretical framework includes the following approaches: the New Literacies Studies (Gee 1990; Street, 2003), especially Gee’s concept of Discourse and Street’s ideas about social literacies and power relations involved in literacy projects; the New London Group’s propositions on multiliteracies (Cope & Kalantzis, 2000 and 2009); the perspective of critical literacies (Gee, 1990, Luke,1993; Morgan, 1997) and Freire’s assumptions on critical pedagogy and problem-posing education (1973, 1978, 1980 e 1984), as long as some reflections on curriculum, power, and cultures (Candau, 1988, 2003 e 2012, Apple & Buras, 2008; Arroyo, 2011 e 2012); Sacristán e Gómes, 1998; Souza Santos, 2001). Based on these theories, we have developed a teacher training program that built a situated approach on critical literacy practices. We apply an action research methodology, following its four steps – planning, action, observing and reflecting – in the mediation of reading and writing workshops for young adults living different situations of social exclusion. Our research question is: how to educate future literacy teachers, adopting a social justice perspective and a critical multicultural approach? In this program, our main purpose is to enhance teachers’ agency and authorship, using co-teaching as a strategy to empower future literacy teachers. We believe that teacher training courses should get in touch with human experiences, creating political and ideological involvement and building an ethical approach that respects the diversity of the students, their contexts and concrete experiences (ARROYO, 2013). Our results show that the oriented, collaborative practice developed in the program helps to break the gap between knowledge and social experiences in teacher education, transforming the future teachers’ conceptions of learning, language, literacies and cultures.


Dream Camp: South African Students Draw on Community Cultural Wealth Capital to Make Sense of Their Career Dreams         

Lori Assaf and Kristie O’Donnell, Texas State Univeristy (USA)

Language: English

The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine the experiences of six, South African multilingual, high school students and one local teacher after participating in a community-based, digital storytelling project on career dreams. The secondary purpose was to uncover the skills, knowledge, and abilities students used as they created digital stories that reflected their future goals and career dreams. Most studies on rural South African students’ literacy learning tend to promote deficit perspectives that do not adequately capture the resources and abilities students have and utilize on a daily basis (Mohangi, Krog Stephens & Nel, 2016). This study adds to the field of literacy research by highlighting multilingual students’ reliance on various forms of community cultural wealth CCW (Yosso, 2005). Qualitative data sources included: observational field notes, transcribed participant interviews (during camp and one year after), transcribed video recording of participants sharing their movies with the community, and participants’ artifacts. Applying constant comparative analysis procedures (Glaser & Strauss, 1999), four major themes emerged from this research: Community encouragement, mentorship, and caring; Who I want to be: “I told myself I want to be something”; Never give up: “I must push myself even when it is hard” and; Language learning and knowledge of literacy abilities. The students relied on social and aspirational capital to imagine their future identities. They articulated their linguistic strengths and needs in both English and Xhosa and felt the project helped them become more confident English speakers. Students’ resources and abilities were made visible to the community members- reinforcing the possibilities and hopes of the students. CCW served as an explanatory frame to understand students’ experiences and resources.


Croatian Prison Reading Program for detainees and their children

Kristina Čunović and Snježana Berak, City library “Ivan Goran Kovačić” Karlovac (CROACIA)

Language: English

About 15000 children in Croatia have at least one parent in prison – invisible to community and vulnerable, as they are direct or indirect victims of their parent’s crimes. Maintaining the parent-child relationship while a parent is detained is essential for overcoming developmental crises. Research in Croatia carried out in Požega and Glina prisons has confirmed that detainees who preserve quality ties with their families show better adaptation to detention. Organisation Parents in Action – RODA in partnership with the Croatian Reading Association conducted in 2015 and 2016 the Prison Reading Program for detainees and their children in Požega, Glina and Lepoglava, financially supported by the Ministry of Social Policy and Youth. Croatian Reading Association members developed workshops, prepared a manual for implementation of the programme and composed a list of books for children and the young, while imprisoned fathers were free to choose a story for their children. The story they read was recorded, also on behalf of project. In the course of one-day workshops, the prison staff and prisoners were trained to participate in the project activities and learn about the importance of reading aloud for achieving a close relationship between parents and children, same as for development of their reading skills. The results of the evaluation participated by the families show that in 88.9% of children were happy to receive their father’s present in the form of a book with an audiotape of their father reading that book. All of the families in this evaluation emphasised that this reading programme strengthens the connection with the father and that a child is happier thanks to promotion and protection of its rights.

 

Location: Aula 3201 (third floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)

Presentation: AELE Team

Language: English


Towards Learning Filipino Heritage Language and Culture through  Filipino Children’s Literature: The Case of a Roving Filipino  Storytelling and Playgroup in Switzerland     

Maria Fe Esperanza Caridad Tañedo Bruni, Kuwentuhang Sabado (SWITZERLAND); Ana Maria Margarita S. Salvador, University of the Philippines (PHILIPPINES); and Cherry Marty Malonzo, Kuwentuhang Sabado (SWITZERLAND)

Language: English

Given the common trend among overseas bilingual Filipino parents of eventually resorting to English as the parental language of communication to their child due to widely-cited reasons of perceived practicality over Filipino, this case study examines the efforts of a roving volunteer Filipino story-telling and playgroup in Switzerland to offer literature-based stimulus experiences to promote Filipino language learning and establish Filipino cultural identity among its young children-participants of Philippine descent. This case study is premised on Norton’s (2000, 2013) explanation of language learning as linked to identity and investment in which language learners, possessing multiple identities shifting across time and space and manifesting itself in social situations, invest in a language with their perceived benefits, imagined futures and communities. It is also based on Krashen’s (1977) affective filter hypothesis in which language learning becomes more effective in emotionally-fulfilling situations as well as Rosenblatt’s (1969) Reader Response Transactional Theory which emphasizes the reader’s efferent or afferent reaction to literature. In this study, the focus is on the personal, affective response of the young participants to Filipino literature.  The on-going case study is currently making use of participant observations by the playgroup facilitators, parent and child interviews and surveys to determine parental reasons for letting their children join the playgroup as well as to ascertain the capability and effectiveness of the playgroup in providing encouraging and meaningful experiences for its young participants to either discover or enhance their Filipino voice in a multi-ethnic, plurilingual Swiss context.  The data gathered will be processed through content analysis.


Biliteracy Development in English and Spanish through Accessing Family and Faith Traditions         

Amie Sarker, University of Dallas (USA)

Language: English

This presentation will explore the Faith and Family Backpack Project Study implemented in two-way immersion schools (English/Spanish). The presenter will briefly review literature concerning culturally-relevant literature and bilingual family engagement and share the research design, findings, and implications from the mixed-methods study associated with this project. Grounded in a sociocultural framework for language and literacy development (Vygotsky, 1978), this study builds upon research regarding the “funds of knowledge” (Moll, Amanti, Neff, & González, 1992) that families and communities possess, which can be harnessed for academic learning. Culturally relevant literature can be particularly useful for instructing second language learners, as it allows them to connect with and better comprehend texts, and it can affirm their experiences and cultural heritage (Freeman & Freeman, 2004; Ebe, 2010; Vyas, 2004). Participants consisted of nine classes of students and their teachers at two schools implementing two-way immersion bilingual programs in grades Pre-K 3 through 2nd grade in an urban Southern USA context. Students were predominantly of Hispanic /Latino heritage with both Spanish and English L1 speakers. Research questions included: In what ways do families from this population and instructional context engage their funds of knowledge while responding to reading children’s literature at home? In what ways are emerging bilingual and biliteracy skills developing through the Faith and Family Story Backpack Project? A design-based research (Bryk, Gomez, Grunow, and LeMahieu, 2015) approach was utilized in this mixed methods study, and the following data sources were analyzed using constant comparative analysis (Glaser & Strauss, 1967) and multiple regression analysis: (1) literature response notebooks, (2) teacher focus groups, (3) parent surveys, and (4) language testing data. Results will be shared regarding the types of funds of knowledge made visible and utilized during this project and the ways in which bilingual and biliteracy skills emerged and were developed.


Developing Global-Ready Teachers and Students in Online Literacy Communities

Lotta Larson, Kansas State University (USA)

Language: English

This presentation explores a global partnership between American pre-service teachers and Swedish ninth graders. Today’s students must develop literacies beyond reading and writing and learn how to embrace tolerance, value cultural and linguistic differences, and develop an appreciation for our common humanity (Mansilla & Jackson, 2014). Furthermore, literacy reflects an increased use of technology, along with diverse practices in political, socioeconomic, cultural, and linguistic contexts. As the world has “flattened” (Friedman, 2007), so have literacy practices; hence, it is crucial for students to become proficient in the new literacies of 21st-century technologies. As a result, teachers have a responsibility to effectively integrate ICTs into the curriculum. Furthermore, developing students’ global competence is a critical component reflected in many international learning outcomes (e.g., ISTE, OECD, P21). To prepare global-ready students, we need global-ready teachers. The International Literacy Association (2015) notes that teachers “should be better prepared to address the needs of learners with diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds across all grades and in all disciplines” (p. 8). This study involves a collaborative project in which 100 American pre-service teachers collaborate with 100 Swedish ninth graders each semester. The two groups create and complete individualized literacy lessons, engage in online literature discussions (involving interactive e-book reading and blogging), and participate in nonfiction writers’ workshop. Analysis of transcripts, shared documents, blogs, and interviews suggests that American pre-service teachers gain online teaching experience of English language learners along with insights about the Swedish education system. Swedish students develop English communication skills. Both groups gain global competence and tolerance, along with 21st-century skills. In addition to sharing detailed results of the study, the presenter will offer resources for international, online collaborations to support audience members who want to engage in global literacy projects.


Early morphological awareness and learning to read morphological complicated words in Greek: A longitudinal study      

Ioannis Grigorakis and George Manolitsis, University of Crete (GREECE)

Language: English

Τhe aim of this longitudinal study was to examine the effects of children’s morphological awareness in kindergarten and grade 1 on the development of reading words with complicated morphological structure in grades 1 and 2 respectively. Two hundred fifteen children from kindergarten up to the grade 1 were assessed on: (a) several tasks of morphological awareness (e.g. word analogy, reversing compounds words), (b) general cognitive skills (nonverbal intelligence, short-term memory, vocabulary), and (c) early literacy skills (phonological awareness, rapid automatized naming (RAN), knowledge of letters). One year later these children were assessed at the end of grades 1 and 2 on reading accuracy and reading fluency of morphological complicated words (derivatives and compounds) and pseudo-derivative words with real derivative morphemes. The results of hierarchical regression analyses showed that children’s morphological awareness in kindergarten did not predict significantly the development of reading accuracy of both words and pseudo-derivative words in grade 1 after the control of general cognitive skills and the educational level of the mother. On the other hand, morphological awareness in grade 1 survived as a significant predictor of reading accuracy for compound words in grade 2, even after controlling for mother’s educational level, phonological awareness and rapid automatized naming (RAN). In contrast, morphological awareness in both kindergarten and grade 1 did not predict the reading fluency of derivative and compound words and pseudo-derivative words after controlling for mother’s educational level, phonological awareness and rapid automatized naming (RAN). Overall, these findings suggest that morphological processing in Greek contributes to the development of reading compound words in grade 2, while the development of reading these words in grade 1 relies more on phonological rather than morphological processing.


The Nature of Young Karen Children’s Bilingual Learning Experiences in a Family Literacy Program

Nicola Friedrich, University of Toronto (CANADA) and Zipporah Devadas, School District #35 (CANADA)

Language: English

Although evaluating the impact of family literacy programs for culturally and linguistically diverse families is difficult, sociocultural research has documented participating children’s immediate growth in both English literacy and language performance levels (e.g., Hirst, Hannon, & Nutbrown, 2010). The purpose of this paper is to extend this research by describing young children’s bilingual learning experiences in a family literacy program. Data were drawn from a larger ethnographic case study examining the literacy practices of children and their families as they participated in a bilingual family literacy program for resettled Karen refugees in an urban centre in western Canada. Data sources for this paper included the program resource document, field notes from observations within the program, transcriptions of interviews with the three focal mothers, and an expert interview with one of the program’s creators. An analysis of the data suggests that, although the Karen language continued to mediate activities within their homes and community, the Karen children were regularly exposed to English in the program. While program facilitators provided for the simultaneous oral translation of instructions and information and the parents frequently spoke in Karen to engage their children in a form of rote practice with English texts, much of the children’s literacy activity was carried out in English and involved English-only texts or the English text of bilingual (Karen-English) books. Specifically, the English-speaking facilitator read from the English text of the bilingual book during Storytime and the children spoke in English as they attempted to read English picture books and form Roman letters at individual activity centres. The paper concludes with a discussion of how the program could better support the children’s bilingual and biliteracy development.

Location: Aula 1301 (first floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)

Presentation: AELE Team

Language: Spanish


Construcción de inferencias a partir de la lectura de textos narrativos en educación primaria

Juan Cruz Ripoll Salceda, Colegio “Santa María la Real de Sarriguren” y Universidad de Navarra (SPAIN); María Isabel Herbert Acero, Colegio “Wexford”, Querétaro (MEXICO); and María del Brezo Baños Ordiz, Centro de Educación Infantil y Primaria “San Miguel de Orcoyen” (SPAIN)

Language: Spanish

Construcción de inferencias a partir de la lectura de textos narrativos en educación primaria En lectura, la construcción de inferencias se refiere a la información aportada por el lector y que no se encuentra explícita en el texto. Se han propuesto numerosas clasificaciones de las inferencias que, según su función, podrían ser referenciales, causales o puente, predictivas, elaborativas o globales. La habilidad inferencial es un componente importante de la comprensión lectora, pero conocemos poco sobre su desarrollo durante la edad escolar. En esta investigación se ha estudiado cómo un grupo de 151 alumnos de 1º a 6º de educación primaria respondía a preguntas relacionadas con las cinco funciones expuestas de las inferencias en cuatro textos narrativos breves. Para cada texto se prepararon tres preguntas literales, tres sobre inferencias referenciales, tres sobre inferencias puente, dos sobre inferencias predictivas, dos sobre inferencias elaborativas y una de tipo global, acerca de la enseñanza del texto. La respuesta fue mejor en las preguntas literales que en las inferenciales y en las inferencias referenciales y causales que en las restantes, sin que se encontrasen diferencias significativas entre inferencias predictivas, elaborativas y globales. Las chicas respondieron mejor que los chicos a las preguntas inferenciales y también se encontraron diferencias significativas respecto al curso, tendiendo a una mejor ejecución cuanto más avanzado era el curso, tanto en preguntas literales como en inferenciales. Estos resultados nos indican que, al menos desde los siete años, los niños son capaces de realizar distintos tipos de inferencias a partir del contenido de una lectura, que esta habilidad mejora a lo largo de la educación primaria y que las inferencias que sirven para mantener la cohesión del texto (referenciales y puente) son las más accesibles.


Concepciones sobre los procesos de lectura de profesores en ejercicio de escuelas primarias chilenas: ¿cuáles son sus perfiles lectores?

María Constanza Errázuriz Cruz, Omar Davison Toro, Liliana Fuentes and Andrea Cocio, Pontificia Universidad Católica (CHILE)

Language: Spanish

La lectura es una competencia fundamental para el desarrollo de aprendizajes en todas las disciplinas escolares (Stanovich & Cunningham, 1998); sin embargo, según las evidencias, el nivel de desempeño de los estudiantes chilenos es insuficiente (PISA, 2012). Asimismo, Aguilar et al. (en prensa) y Makuc (2008) constataron que las concepciones sobre escritura y lectura de los estudiantes de pedagogía y de profesores chilenos son cercanas a las reproductivas. La relevancia de estos resultados radica en cómo las concepciones de los docentes podrían impactar sobre el desempeño lector de sus estudiantes. Es por esto que el presente trabajo expone los resultados parciales de una investigación que tiene como objetivo analizar las concepciones acerca de la lectura de profesores de primaria chilenos. Con respecto a las concepciones acerca de la lectura, se consideró la tipología de transmisión o transacción, que considera esta actividad como una reproducción del conocimiento o una construcción de este (Schraw & Bruning, 1999). En relación con la metodología, es cuantitativa e incluyó la participación de una muestra representativa de docentes de primaria de la Araucanía (n=300). Para relevar las concepciones, se adaptó un cuestionario de concepciones de lectura (Schraw & Bruning, 1999; Lordán et al., 2015). En su aplicación piloto, tuvo un Alfa de Cronbach de 0,80, por lo que resultó ser suficientemente confiable. Por último, se comprobó que los profesores presentan ambas concepciones simultáneamente, pero que predominan aquellas de reproducción. Dentro de ambos tipos se identificaron perfiles específicos, según el foco de la atención en la lectura, los cuales posiblemente pueden afectar las prácticas docentes.


Entender procesos para justificar decisiones. MOOC que presenta la Alfabetización Inicial

Liliana Avalos Corichi, Alma Carrasco Altamirano and Elizabeth Cortés Sandoval, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla (MEXICO)

Language: Spanish

La alfabetización inicial es un reto prioritario de la educación básica en México. El desconocimiento de los procesos de adquisición inicial del sistema de representación que es la lengua escrita, así como de los fundamentos y recursos de metodologías sintéticas y analíticas para aprender a leer y escribir (cfr. Barbosa Held, 1983) llevan a los docentes y a los padres de familia a elegir indiscriminadamente actividades para alfabetizar. Conocer sobre los procesos individuales psicogenéticos de invención y reconocimiento del funcionamiento convencional de la lengua escrita (cfr. Ferreiro, 2013, 1979) y sobre las prácticas sociales (cfr. Hernández Zamora, 2013) que dan forma a los eventos de alfabetización inicial en los que os niños participan apoyará a los adultos que acompañan a los niños a elegir y seguir un método de alfabetización más integral (cfr. Carrasco, et. Al., 2015). La educación en línea a través de un MOOC (Curso Online Masivo Abierto) permitirá atender al interés genuino de padres de familia, educadores y sociedad por conocer los fundamentos acerca de cómo iniciar a los niños en la alfabetización inicial. Los MOOC son la nueva tendencia para ofertar educación abierta por parte de las instituciones de educación superior. La Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla (BUAP), en alianza con las Universidades Autónomas de Baja California (UABC) y Tlaxcala (UATx) oferta un curso en línea de seis semanas y en esta ponencia se presentan los fundamentos, la organización y las decisiones didácticas para desarrollar esta propuesta de educación flexible.


La alfabetización inicial en la mira. MOOC multidisciplinario construido colaborativamente en México

Edna Serrano Acuña, Jaqueline Mata Santel and Guadalupe Tinajero Villavicencio, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla (MEXICO)

Language: Spanish

Desde la perspectiva del diseño instruccional, un aspecto que define la efectividad del aprendizaje, es la forma en la cual se procesa la información visual; por tanto, la tecnología se implementa como un recurso de innovación para la elaboración de los materiales y del diseño de ambientes de aprendizaje. Este trabajo se enmarca en el desarrollo de un proyecto multidisciplinario e interinstitucional para atender a la formación en materia de alfabetización inicial, una asignatura pendiente del sistema educativo mexicano (cfr. Carrasco et al., 2014). El reto es producir materiales para docentes que tienen la tarea de acompañar procesos de alfabetización inicial con niños mexicanos, particularmente de ofrecer apoyos a quienes trabajan con niños indígenas migrantes. Un diseñador gráfico, cómo especialista debe trabajar en colaboración con otros especialistas temáticos en la configuración de estructuras de información destinadas al plano visual. Se emplea para el diseño del MOOC (Massive On line Open Course) el enfoque de Diseño de experiencias (Norman, D., 2016), uso de métodos y técnicas aplicadas estratégicamente para lograr que un grupo particular de personas puedan ejecutar tareas de aprendizaje de forma eficiente, cómoda y sencilla. Se recurre a la Teoría de la actividad de Leontiev (1978) reconocida en el ámbito pedagógico, pero también en el medio del diseño de interacción (Kaptelinin, 2016) pues permite relacionar coherentemente actividades, acciones y operaciones que el usuario del MOOC debe realizar a nivel cognitivo (su propio sistema de aprendizaje) con el plano virtual que en este caso sería la interfaz del MOOC. Se propone emplear el modelo Activity System de Engeström (2016) que permite resolver las relaciones entre diversos factores como los sujetos, herramientas, normativa, comunidad, entre otros.


La descodificación y la comprensión del lenguaje como predictores de la comprensión lectora: evidencias de un estudio longitudinal      

Milagros Tapia, Juan Cruz Ripoll and Gerardo Aguado, Universidad de Navarra (SPAIN)

Language: Spanish

La comprensión lectora es una actividad compleja que ha dado lugar a diferentes teorías y modelos que explican su desarrollo. La Concepción Simple de la Lectura (Simple View of Reading) resulta un modelo útil porque explica el desarrollo de la comprensión lectora a partir de dos procesos esenciales: la descodificación y la comprensión del lenguaje. Casi toda la literatura sobre la CSL se ha realizado en inglés, lengua que se caracteriza por su alta opacidad. El propósito de esta investigación ha sido validar la CSL en un idioma transparente como es el español, en alumnos de primero y tercer curso de educación primaria. Tras un análisis de regresión, la CSL logró explicar el 49 y 55% de la varianza de la comprensión lectora en primer y tercer curso de primaria respectivamente. Los resultados indican que la correlación entre comprensión lectora y comprensión del lenguaje aumenta significativamente y la correlación entre comprensión lectora y descodificación va disminuyendo a medida que el lector se va haciendo más experto. Por otro lado, la fluidez lectora es la variable que mejor predice la comprensión lectora en primer curso; y el vocabulario, en tercer curso de primaria. Estos resultados tienen importantes implicaciones en la práctica educativa. Es necesario poner énfasis tanto en las habilidades que subyacen a la descodificación y a la comprensión del lenguaje, dado su valor predictivo que tienen sobre la comprensión lectora.

Location: Aula 3301 (third floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)

Presentation: AELE Team

Language: English


Students’ Literacy Experiences in an Age of Accountability and Standards        

Cami Condie and Francesca Pomerantz, Salem State University (USA)

Language: English

U.S educators work in a context shaped by accountability measures and standards; schools are ranked based on student performance on standardized tests. We are concerned that these factors supersede students’ needs in literacy instruction (e.g., Valencia & Buly, 2004). We observed and interviewed fifteen teachers teaching two literacy lessons each for a total of thirty lessons and thirty interviews. We analyzed the lesson transcripts to understand what students were doing. We then analyzed the interview data to better understand the purpose of the lessons and the teachers’ decision-making. What were students reading, writing and speaking about? How and in what ways did teachers consider students’ motivation and interest? How and what ways did teachers consider students’ needs? Findings revealed most lessons were designed to teach reading skills, not to develop content knowledge or to provide opportunities for reading extended text. The absence of reading and discussion that could engage children in considering questions and issues about life, history, how our world works and the human condition were notably absent from many lessons. One third of lessons included content, such as segregation, the mathematical concept of pairs, or character motivation; the other two-thirds focused on skills such as cause/effect or text features, rather than the “big ideas,” concepts or themes in the texts (Duffy, 2014, p. 77). Although teachers knew a lot about their students, this knowledge was not systematically used to plan instruction that would meet students’ learning needs and engage them as learners. The influence of high stakes testing was evident in these lessons. An argument for preserving the role of scaffolding and motivation in literacy instruction within a context of accountability will be presented, along with examples from the data and the research literature (e.g., Guthrie et al., 2004) demonstrating how this integration can be achieved.


Reflecting on the Impact of PISA Assessments on Literacy Development Policy for Irish Schools: The Case of the 2009 Results

Brian Murphy, University College Cork (IRELAND)

Language: English

The OECD Programme for International Student Assessments (PISA) are high profile and powerful international comparative assessments of 15-year olds used by governments worldwide in assessing and benching educational outcomes and achievements between countries. While Irish 15-year olds performed above average in literacy in the PISA assessments during the first three cycles in 2000, 2003 & 2006, an ‘apparent’ serious decline in literacy achievement in the 2009 assessments resulted in a national outcry about literacy teaching and literacy standards in Irish schools. This paper examines some of the reactions and responses to the Irish PISA 2009 results by various stakeholders. It goes on to highlight and discuss some of the positive and negative impacts that the official responses to the Irish PISA 2009 results appears to have had on literacy development policy and practice in Irish schools, especially in light of the return to a strong Irish performance in literacy in PISA 2012 assessments. The paper will also take account of and make reference to the most up-to-date PISA data and the Irish performance in the PISA 2015 tests, the results of which are due to be released in early December 2016.


Investigating the Quality of English Achievement Tests: The Case of Iranian High School Students’ Overall Scores

Hossein Heidari Tabrizi, Islamic Azad University, Isfahan Branch (IRAN)

Language: English

In Iranian high schools, the only benchmark against which the students’ English achievement is evaluated is the test scores on their report cards. According to the rules and regulations, English teachers are required to report the average score of a student based on her/his performance on the oral as well as written tests. The present research study aimed to explore whether Iranian high school female students’ English scores on their report cards represent the real sum of their oral and written test scores. In so doing, the report card average scores of 30 female students in Grade Eleven at one Iranian girls’ high schools in Isfahan, Iran were compared with their scores on a researcher-made validated oral and written test. The results of the study revealed that the scores of the subjects on the newly developed test were higher than those recorded on their report cards. The results of a paired t test showed a statistically significant difference between the means of these two sets of scores rejecting the common false presupposition that the Iranian high school students would have low performance in oral skills in English as their foreign language. It was also revealed that English teachers usually skipped the oral test and rated their students’ oral ability just based on their own intuition or students’ performance on the English achievement written test. It seems that the exclusion of the oral test lead to this difference in the scores. It can be concluded that Iranian high school students’ scores appearing on their report card are not a valid reflection of their oral and written ability in English.


The Challenges and Risks within High Stakes Literacy Assessments

Jody Polleck, Hunter College—CUNY (USA) and Jill Jeffery, Leiden University Centre for Linguistics (NETHERLANDS)

Language: English

In the United States, the majority of states (43 out of 50) have adopted a set of national literacy standards, called the Common Core State Standards (CCSS). With this adoption came the rapid development of new high-stakes examinations. These exams are high-stakes in that students may not receive their high school diploma if they do not get a passing score on these tests. Though researchers have investigated the standards and related literacy policy initiatives, less attention has been directed toward understanding how the standards have been translated into testing programs. Due to the strong influence that high-stakes literacy tests exert on classroom teaching, research is needed to investigate what kinds of changes in test content are associated with the standards, as well as the potential impact of these changes on students and teachers. Accordingly, this case study examines changes made to one high-stakes literacy exam by comparing pre- and post-CCSS literacy tests administered to high school students in New York. The study responds to the following questions: (1) How did the adoption of CCSS alter the design of high school literacy exams in New York? (2) To what extent do the exams represent measures of college readiness as opposed to early college equivalence? and (3) What are the implications of CCSS exam adaptations for the goal of preparing students to be college and career ready? Findings suggest that the rush to implement more rigorous standardized tests resulted in an exceedingly long and difficult exams that might be more representative of early college equivalence rather than of college readiness. This study has implications worldwide as nations begin to develop their own set of graduation exams in literacy that may or may not be appropriate for students and their literacy development.


Pluriliteracies and Bilingual Education in the Knowledge Society: Fostering Equity and Social Inclusion in 21st-Century Communities      

Leonor María Martínez Serrano, University of Córdoba (SPAIN)

Language: English

Literacy is one of the main prerequisites for learning to happen. There are other essential prerequisites such as a tremendous sense of curiosity, huge doses of patience and constancy, and love for learning, which remains one of the fundamental vocations of all human beings from all times and places. The ability to read and the ability to write well are tantamount to understanding our ancestors’ intellectual achievements (i.e., their insights and lessons about the world and our place in it) and to contributing something valuable to the epistemological adventure of our species on Earth, which is a gigantic work in progress. However, in the so-called Knowledge Society, the ability to read and write well in the mother tongue (L1) and an additional language (L2) is not enough for individuals to actively engage with a world where information and knowledge are embodied in multiple codes and to take part in a global conversation. In a globalised world of increasingly mobile humans, at a time of historical acceleration and profound changes in society, it is of the essence to pay attention to language as the most powerful tool to co-construct knowledge in different educational contexts marked by plurilingualism and multiculturalism. Equity and social inclusion cannot be guaranteed if citizens are not empowered by means of literacy to learn at school and throughout their lives and to take an active role in a plurilingual, multicultural world as responsible citizens. In the European context, CLIL (Content and Language Integrated Learning), which has been defined as “a dual-focused educational approach in which an additional language is used for the learning and teaching of both content and language” (Coyle et al., 2010: 1), represents a great opportunity to deal with reading and writing as efficient tools to access subject content or disciplinary knowledge through both the L1 and L2 of learners. CLIL is highly sensitive to language(s) as being the invisible stuff mediating knowledge construction, since in education (and in life in general) we need language to think with and process new information, as well as to convey new ideas and insights to others. Learning content subjects through a second language is a challenging experience which is not devoid of intellectual rewards, though. At any rate, learning History, Biology, Philosophy or any other academic discipline in a CLIL context through English as a foreign language (the lingua franca of our modern world) or through the mother tongue, regardless of whether it is Spanish, German, French or any of the 6,000 languages spoken on Earth, should be a pleasurable experience of optimal learning. That huge amounts of knowledge are coded in oral and written texts seems a truism, but we need to be reminded that this is the case. At school we deal with knowledge and we deal with huge amounts of texts written in academic language. Mastery over disciplinary content is ultimately visible in learners’ ability to write (and speak) about it in high-quality language that denotes conceptual clarity and deep understanding. In this paper, we look at the connection between CLIL and the crucial concepts of ‘pluriliteracies’, disciplinary discourse and deep thinking in bilingual education, where verbal and nonverbal codes are used simultaneously to enhance students’ critical thinking skills to understand reality.

6.00 p.m. Coffee Break / Performance

C Parallel sessions (Tuesday, 4 July – from 6.30 p.m. to 7.30 p.m.): ORAL PRESENTATIONS / POSTERS

Location: Aula 2531 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)

Presentation: AELE Team

Language: English


Project work as a way to engage students in real and significant literacy practices

Maria da Conceição Quinteira Pires and José António Brandão Carvalho, Institute of Education – The University of Minho (PORTUGAL)

Language: English

The engagement of students in real and significant literacy practices has a strong impact on the development of students’ writing abilities. However, it appears that a large part of writing tasks that occur in language classes have a fictional character and address the teacher, who appears as their unique recipient. Besides that, other writing tasks, namely those that take place in the context of different school subjects, tend to be focussed on knowledge reproduction and often have only evaluative purposes. Involving students in project works that have a strong connection with the social community where the school is inserted enables them to participate in real and meaningful communication events. In the development of such projects, they have to deal with complex problem solving tasks implying the use of diverse textual genres, what contributes to the enhancement of their writing capacities. In this paper we describe a project work that was being developed in a school situated in the interior region of northern Portugal (Douro). Students participated in a project, involving several reading and writing tasks that aimed at the dissemination of relevant cultural and touristic aspects of the region and the promotion of its most famous product – the Port Wine. This project is the focus of a doctoral thesis that is being prepared at the moment following an action research methodology.


Expressing and Reflecting: Writing for the Real World    

Janet McIntosh, Nipissing University, Schulich School of Education (CANADA)

Language: English

Writing in a reflective manner is an expectation in course work for teacher candidates, qualifying to teach secondary school English. As an English teacher educator in Canada, I’ve observed in classes that some are challenged when writing reflectively. They sometimes voice that it doesn’t come naturally to them, or ask how real authors write. I wonder about what might make learning to write reflectively more meaning for them. What approach could I implement to enhance this writing skill, and thereby guide English teacher candidates to become more effective, reflective writers? Education standards emphasize the value of “connecting content to the real world [resulting in] authentic learning experiences” (Behizadeh, 2014, p. 33). When moving writing beyond classrooms and teaching, what is real-world writing? One purpose of writing, according to Bean, Chappell & Gillam (2013), is to express and reflect: “the writer expresses or reflects on his or her own life and experiences, and often looks backwards in order to look forward” (p. 19). There is relevance in considering “shifting the focus of writing instruction toward real writing purposes” (Gallagher, 2011, p. 9). This work-in-progress paper explores strategic instruction that begins with expressive writing, and leads into reflective writing. The approach places the purposes of real world writing at the forefront, and includes specific strategies I am currently implementing with teacher candidates in my Fall term (2016) Senior English (secondary grades 11-12) course. Strategies include short, personal written pieces composed at the beginning of each class, and oral discussion of both the process and product.


Encouraging Reflective Practice in Pre-Service Literacy and Language Teachers          

Cami Condie, Francesca Pomerantz and Melanie Gonzalez, Salem State University (USA)

Language: English

As teacher educators we wonder how to provide feedback to our students after lesson observations in a way that encourages reflective practice. In a previous research study investigating knowledge transfer from pre-service to in-service teaching, we noticed two of the research methods held promise for helping teachers reflect on their practice (Pomerantz & Condie, 2016). This subsequent study investigated how and in what ways these reflective tools affected the conversation and thinking of pre-service teachers about their practice. Participants were pre-service teachers who were observed teaching one literacy lesson and assigned to one of three conditions after the lesson: 1) Reflective Question Protocol Only, 2) Stimulated Recall plus Reflective Question Protocol, and 3) Feedback (using the state-mandated rubric for teacher candidate evaluation). These post-observation meetings were audiotaped and transcribed. Analysis was guided by the research question: How and in what ways do reflective tools affect conversations and thinking of pre-service teachers about their literacy practice? The first condition, Reflective Question Protocol, invited teachers to think about the degree to which they were able to apply what they learned in teacher preparation, the purpose of the observed lesson and whether it was achieved, and what they might do differently in the next lesson. The second condition included Reflective Question Protocol plus Stimulated Recall, which was used to “explore learners’ thought processes” (Gass & Mackey, 2000, p. xi) through the use of videotape recall, similar to previous studies (e.g., Gatbonton, 1999, 2008; Mullock, 2006). Teachers watched segments of their videotaped lessons and described their thoughts synchronously. Findings indicated that feedback alone did not inspire the kind of reflection evoked in the other two conditions. Differences in the nature of the conversations using the reflective tools will be discussed, along with implications for teacher educators looking to support pre-service teachers’ reflective practice.


Engaging Youngsters to Search for the Answers of Big Questions through the Use of Reading and Writing

Shu-Hua Tang and Hung-Yu Lin, National Taiwan Normal University (CHINA)

Language: English

Young people are faced with many developmental issues. One of them is to search for the answer of big questions, e.g., finding the meaning of life. However, it is hard to directly discuss these big questions with them due to their tendency to avoid serious talking with adults. Great literature, in contrast, deeply explores these issues and provides a variety of perspectives through characters. Therefore, the use of great literature could serve as an alternative to ease up the difficulties. The purpose of the present project was to develop a one-week literacy program for middle school students, in which literature relevant to those issues was chosen and activities integrated with reading and writing were designed. A group of eight 11th grade students were recruited voluntarily. They first wrote a persuasive essay about “Why is it necessary to pursue dreams in your life?” which was served as a pre-test. They then were engaged with adopted literature (including 2 Classics: Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka, Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller, 1 movie: October Sky, and excerpts adopted from the school textbooks) in 5 consecutive sessions. In addition to reading alone and discussion with peers, students were also encouraged to write personal journals on how those main characters of the stories make choices in life, and they could use those journals as prompts to develop their own explanations. At the end of the reading program, they then used these explanations to write another essay with the same title of pre-test, which was served as the posttest. Results of the study indicated that not only students formed deeper thinking of big questions but also reflected more positive attitude toward reading. Thus, the integration of reading and writing activities should have potential value for youngsters’ inquiry of big questions. However, certain dilemma also arose. Implications for developing reading materials and pedagogies for youngsters thus were discussed.

Location: Aula 2532 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)

Presentation: AELE Team

Language: English


Through the Pages of Books: Pre-service Teachers’ Use of Bibliotherapy to Construct Identity and Support Social and Emotional Development

Debbie Mercer and Lotta Larson, Kansas State University (USA)

Language: English

This study explores how pre-service teachers use children’s literature to construct identity in self and others and support students’ social and emotional development.  Preparing future teachers for today’s diverse classrooms is vital, yet challenging. In the United States alone, almost 50 percent of K-12 students have experienced traumatic events or live in adverse circumstances including neglect, abuse, poverty, and racism which negatively impact learning, behaviors, and relationships (NCHS, 2011). The International Literacy Association (2016) emphasizes the importance of focusing on children’s social and emotional growth, in addition to academic literacy performance. Unfortunately, mental health-care services that could help students cope with trauma and tragedy are often unavailable or unaffordable. However, teachers and librarians are often in a unique position to develop lasting, supporting relationships with students in which healing and growth may develop (Mental Health America, 2016). While teachers use many different tools and strategies to support students in these areas, it is widely recognized that that bibliotherapy, or the use of literature to guide solutions to personal or social problems (AHIL Quarterly, 1966), can be particularly valuable. Children’s literature can further be used to help students construct identity in self and others. This research examines pre-service teachers’ understanding of bibliotherapy, and their ability to identify and implement literacy activities that support students’ social and emotional development (e.g., reading aloud, community building, story writing).  In addition, the researchers closely examine the types of books (e.g., chapter books, picture books, genres, topics) pre-service teachers select to construct identity and support social and emotional development in their students, and their reasons for making such selections.


Children’s and young people’s literature preferences: Research findings and a theory for encouraging equity through literacy communities

John Beach, St. John’s University (USA)

Language: English

This presentation summarizes research on the literature preferences of children and young people as contrasted with those of adults to demonstrate the need to revise curriculum and encouraging reading engagement both in and outside of schools. In addition a succinct synthesis of literature and literacy theories is offered to guide the establishment of literacy communities that may foster lifetime reading interest. A content analysis of annual “best” book lists selected by adults (librarians, teachers, reviewers) and by children and young people reveals significant differences in the types of texts each group values. Given today’s increasing connections among countries and cultures through technology and marketing, bridges must be built between the academic classics and current and popular texts to enable committed practice for literacy development and lifetime engagement. While the original data set comes from the United States, this has been updated and expanded to include young adults’ views and supplemented with analyses of text types including the IBBY Honor Lists. The findings are pertinent to a wide array of countries and cultures and raise significant points for discussion and consideration. Findings from the data support a synthesis of research and theoretical studies which yield a scheme for identifying texts that will encourage reading within and beyond schools, along with a system of categories and text factors that may be used to promote both more engagement in reading and better understanding of how texts accomplish their goals.


Promoting equity: Swedish teachers integrating technology to enhance literacy learning for students

Elizabeth Stolle, Grand Valley State University (USA)

Language: English

In Sweden, national learning standards guide instruction, but school leaders and teachers decide what resources and methods should be used to meet these standards (Thullberg, 2007). In the classroom, teachers determine when to use and how to use Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) in the curriculum, specifically to promote equity in literacy learning. In this, both the teacher’s conceptualizations of and intentions to use ICTs are critical to the success of the implementation of ICTs (Ma, Anderson, & Streith, 2005). Despite decades of research investigating new literacy skills and pedagogical knowledge demanded by ICTs, which impact student learning (Anderson, 1987; Coiro, Knobel, Lankshear & Leu, 2008; Karchmer-Klein & Shinas, 2012), teachers often struggle to implement their conceptualizations of ICTs in their pedagogical practices (Stolle, 2008; Hutchison & Reinking 2011). This study investigates the relationship between teachers’ conceptualizations and uses of ICTs in everyday pedagogical practices to promote equity in literacy learning across the disciplines. The theoretical frame draws from theories linking literacy, technology, learning, and critical literacy: technology/literacy have a transactional relationship (Leu et al., 2004); literacy is a social practice (Street, 1984); multiple perspectives of reality exist (Labbo & Reinking, 1999); and examination of the subjective positions from which we make sense of the world must happen for action to take place (Shor, 1999). Data collection included classroom observations, in-depth interviews, and a researcher’s journal. Data analysis included Miles and Huberman’s (1994) qualitative data analysis tools and Richardson’s (2000, p. 293) writing as a “way of knowing.” Findings suggest teachers struggle with a robust conceptualization of ICT integration in literacy instruction and question whether ICTs have the ability to promote equity. Despite these struggles and questions, teachers willingly approximate for the benefit of student literacy learning.


Using Poetry to Construct Identity

Barbara Kane Schneider, Grand Valley State University (USA) and Mary W. Spor, Reading and Literacy International (USA)

Language: English

It is a widely accepted pedagogical construct that engaging children with text is productive teaching. Strategies that engage all students and allow for diverse tastes, talents and abilities promote cognitive development. In addition to cognitive development, empathy, mutual understanding and cross cultural learning are worthwhile goals in today’s complicated society. As Huck, Hepler, Hickman, and Kiefer (1997) commented, “Because children naturally take such delight in books, we sometimes need to remind ourselves that books can do more for children than entertain them. “ (p.8). Literature can have affective as well as cognitive implications. Wolf states “Thus , the experience of reading children’s literature with adults extends far beyond the precise moments of reading to grasping the creative and continuing possibilities of literary language, character, setting, plot, and theme for children’s own literary inventions and their relations with friends, family, and even frightening strangers.” (p. 21). The “I Poem” is a strategy to help children see through the eyes of others and is particularly effective when used with biographies and auto biographies. It requires students to see the world from a different perspective as well as their own. We will share examples of student work, a format for the poetry, and have the audience write and share their I Poems. Examples of student literature might include: Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi, Leaving China by James McMullan, Holes by Louis Sacher, and Hansel and Gretel (Grimm Brothers) illustrated by Anthony Browne.

Location: Aula 2533 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)

Presentation: AELE Team

Language: English


Global Literacy Problem Solving and Collaborative Solutions                  

Marlene Zakierski, The Sage Colleges Albany (USA); Chai Ling Tsai, Iona College (USA) and Taiwan University; and Alice Siegel, The Sage Colleges (USA)

Language: English

This global initiative will share the work of a National Science Foundation Grant awarded to a computer science and literacy education professors in multiple colleges: Iona College in New Rochelle, New York , Taiwan University, Taiwan and The Sage Colleges in Albany, New York, United States of America. In the United States, students take ELA state assessments to gauge their reading comprehension, which is the precursor for learning in all content areas and is essential to students’ future success. Students who do not meet the benchmark for the state’s determined standard for their particular grade level would then be eligible for academic intervention services. However, a single assessment score as the outcome measure is often insufficient in identifying underlying learning problems, especially for reading comprehension. To assist teachers to identify reading disabilities in order to deliver effective teaching plans, this interdisciplinary collaboration between Computer Science and Literacy Education aims to provide analyses on the text-dependent questions and associated textual evidence from the text, instead of the analysis on the overall assessment scores. The main novelty of our idea is the identification of reading comprehension obstacles at an individual level, and it also complements a data-driven instruction framework by maximizing the information gain from each test, which can result in fewer tests taken and more hours for teaching per school year. Each of the presenters will share their specific role as well as their preliminary findings. Some of the topics that will be addressed are as follows: association analysis, lexile properties of words, academic vocabulary and professional development.


Reading in Literature Circles: A case study of building inclusive literacy practices through dialogic learning

Alyson Simpson, University of Sydney (AUSTRALIA)

Language: English

The provision of education for reading as a life skill is a basic human right. However, the inclusion of engagement with reading for enjoyment and critical awareness in education has become an issue of social justice. Calls for 21st century learning focus on critical thinking and problem solving, communication and collaboration, applied imagination and invention. Yet, despite the rhetoric of 21st century skills current measures of literacy success have created inequitable learning experiences where constrained skills are given instructional priority. Students who need to learn how to think critically are being limited to series of repetitive decoding tasks in order to ensure they make a small percentage gain in lower order achievements. In recognition of this problem different models of literacy practices and pedagogic strategies are proposed. Teachers following the principles of dialogic learning can help all students learn to:- reflect on ideas and opinions about characters, settings and events in literary texts, identifying areas of agreement and difference with others and justifying a point of view; – recognise, explain and analyse the ways literary texts draw on readers’ knowledge of other texts and enable new understanding and appreciation of aesthetic qualities; – explore the ways that ideas and viewpoints in literary texts drawn from different historical, social and cultural contexts may reflect or challenge the values of individuals and groups In this paper I describe a school based research study where students worked in Literature Circles building communities of readers that supported inclusive literacy practices related to the learning outcomes listed above. The study showcases good practices in literacy where the designed in use of rich conversation about challenging literary texts enriched the teaching of reading for primary students aged 10-11. The data highlights the impact of creating an equitable space for learners of all backgrounds and abilities.


Studying the Effectiveness of a Storytelling/Story-Acting Activity on Ugandan Preschoolers’ Emergent Literacy in Two Rural Ugandan Community Libraries

Valeda Dent, St. John´s University (USA) and Geoff Goodman, Long Island University (USA)

Language: English

This presentation describes a Fulbright-funded research project aimed at exploring the impact of two rural village libraries in Uganda on preschool children’s school readiness skills (emergent literacy, receptive vocabulary, and theory of mind). This study explored the effectiveness of a six-month play-based intervention known as the Storytelling/Story-Acting (STSA) activity. Children ages 3 to 5 at each library were randomly assigned to participate in either the STSA intervention (n = 63) or a story-reading activity (n = 60) for one hour twice per week for six months. With the aid of translators, all children were administered an emergent literacy measure (knowledge of colors, letters, numbers/counting, sizes and comparisons, and shapes), a receptive vocabulary measure, and a theory of mind measure (along with other instruments) before and after the six-month intervention. Children who participated in the STSA intervention had higher scores on the colors subtest of the emergent literacy measure than children who did not participate in this activity. When examining both groups together (N = 121 post-intervention), only girls who scored low on a baseline measure of receptive vocabulary ability showed improvement at post-intervention. Boys who initially scored low showed no improvement. We argue that preschool girls with poor receptive vocabulary skills might show more improvement with the STSA activity than preschool boys with similarly poor skills because preschool boys might have lower emotional investment in an activity that includes telling and acting out stories than preschool girls do. We will also present results of the theory of mind task as well as a preview of two other projects emerging from this large data set: 1) a study of participants’ twice-weekly drawings as markers of self-representational change over time and 2) a study of gender roles looking through the lens of the translated stories told by the STSA participants.


Examining Literacy Coaches Professional Development in a Virtual Professional Learning Community

Celeste Bates and Leslie A. Salley, Clemson University (USA)

Language: English

Professional Learning Communities (PLCs) are being implemented nationwide and offer opportunities for educators to collaboratively inquire and study innovative literacy practices (Chappuis, Chappius, & Stiggins, 2009; DuFour, Eaker, & DuFour, 2008). Technology can provide an alternative time and space for PLC members to collaborate, providing a level flexibility that face-to-face meetings cannot (Blitz, 2013). The purpose of this designed-based study was to utilize a Virtual Professional Learning Community (VPLC) intentionally designed on Edmodo to connect 18 district-level literacy coaches (LC) across time and space, while examining the ways in which the VPLC promoted or hindered self-reflection and collaboration. Modified online protocols (McDonald, Zydney, Dichter, & McDonald, 2012) were developed to provide structure for the discussions that occurred within the modules. In addition to the discussions, data sources included all content on the VPLC and the artifacts posted by participants. Initial data analysis revealed evidence of self-reflection, but limited evidence of collaboration with identified barriers to collaboration including group size; platform; timing; protocols; facilitation. In subsequent iterations some of these barriers were addressed and the changes led to self-reflection and collaboration.

Location: Aula 2534 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)

Presentation: AELE Team

Language: English


The partnership between school, library, cinema, theatre, museum and gallery improves reading literacy

Hanuš Barbara, Primary School Livada (SLOVENIA)

Language: English

Reading can help us step into other people’s shoes and empathize with other people. When we read books, we think about characters in the book and also about ourselves. How about when watching a film or a theatre performance, visiting a museum or a gallery? In Slovenia there are great education programmes for children and youth. One of them is Kinobalon – a film education programme for which all the pedagogical material for teachers can be found on the website. In the annual school catalogue every film is accompanied by useful information: age recommendation, the film’s relation to school curriculum, topics of each film and suggested, extra-curricular activities. In teaching resources there are more proposals for further work with each film. The more teachers are impressed by a book, film, performance or exhibition, the more positive will be their attitude towards arts and teaching arts. When we watch a film, we can see the world from another perspective. Talking about books is similar to talking about films and performances or discussing about art. In theatres, museums, and galleries they also prepare pedagogic material and try to promote their work. I will also talk about the collaboration between schools and libraries. In Slovenia there are many good programmes and most students take part in them. “Growing Up with a Book” is a national project for the promotion of reading culture. Its purpose is to motivate students of the last three years of primary school and secondary school students to read young adult literature by Slovenian authors and to encourage them to visit general public libraries. Reading books, watching films, performances and exhibitions are creative processes. The schools, cinemas, theatres, libraries, museums and galleries must be open learning environments; the partnership can improve reading motivation and multiliteracy.


Inside, Outside and Around Pictures

Dilek Altun, Ahi Evran University (TURKEY) and Mustafa Ulusoy, Gazi University (TURKEY)

Language: English

Picture books enable reader to integrate text and visuals in meaning making process (Kendrick & McKay, 2004; Kiefer, 1995; Sipe, 2000). Charland, Saint-Aubinand, and Evans (2007) showed that young children’s majority of the fixation are on the visuals during picture book reading process. Semiology focus on the system of signs and visual meaning making process. Wordless books present content and cues for children to tell stories by using visuals. Wordless books enable children to foster sequential thinking, visual reading, sense of story elements, creative expression and inferential thinking by telling stories. The pictorial prompts are tool to support children’s imagination, perspective taking, social imagination and creating stories (Knudsen-Lindauer, 1988).Children’s capacity of inferential thinking, story comprehension, perspective taking and social imagination developmentally have been examined under different disciplines such as theory of mind, social development, cognitive development (Baron-Cohen, 2001; Fernyhough, 2008; Lysaker& Butler, 2012; Tomasello et al., 2005).Wordless books are potential medium to examine the development of story elements, sense of story, social imagination and inferential thinking. The present study aimed to investigate young children’s story creating processes by using wordless books from kindergarten to second grade. The study is used phenomenological research design. The participants are 30 children from preschool to 2th grade. The data will be collected by using a wordless book. First, children will touch and examine the book individually. Each child will be constituted their own stories and their oral explanations will be audio recorded. The oral narratives will also be examined regarding story elements, inferential thinking, and social imagination dimensions regarding age group and gender.


Is it all about the image?: Teacher candidates’ production choices in multimodal literacy autobiographies

Marianne McTavish and Margot Filipenko, University of British Columbia (CANADA)

Language: English

This paper examines two teacher candidates’ digital literacy autobiographies to understand the ways in which these autobiographies, as part of a foundational literacy education course assignment, served to organize, reflect, and impact their understandings of literacy in the 21st Century. We frame the paper around the following questions: 1) What production choices do teacher candidate participants make in the creation of their digital autobiographies; and, 2) What does the content of the digital texts reveal about these teacher candidates’ literacy beliefs? Analysis of the teacher candidates’ digital autobiographies and follow-up interviews revealed the teacher candidates used a range of compositional tools in their creation of their autobiographies and successfully produced synergetic digital multimedia texts. Not only did the process of creating a personal digital literacy autobiography demand that participants identify beliefs about their own literacy understandings, but in sharing with others, they negotiated their understandings, and in the process, came to understand literacy as a complex multimodal communicative practice. Despite the growing popularity of digital storytelling in education as situated sites of learning, little attention has been paid to the composition of these texts.   This study, which focused on the compositional elements employed in the production of two pre-service teachers’ digital literacy autobiographies, is important in that findings have implications for supporting teachers’ and students’ understanding of and composing for multimedia, multimodal texts. We believe this project is important in shifting thinking from narrow, reductive literacy beliefs to those more congruent with 21st Century literacy demands.


Using Provocative Picture Books to Inspire Talking and Writing

Terry Campbell, Nipissing University (CANADA)

Language: English

If we want our students to engage in writing, they need something to write about. A well-illustrated picture book with a perplexing or shocking problem, strong characters, and a vivid setting can provide that something that stimulates them to respond on a personal level. Given the opportunity to talk, they can delve into a problem raised by the story, and become motivated to write about it. Two provocative picture books will be investigated, one for younger students (Grades 1-3, about 6-8 years old), and one suitable for older students (Grades 4-6; about 9-11 years). A third text will be investigated for its visual impact. In the first text, The Red Lemon, Bob Staake poses the problem right away. The cover shows a farmer holding a basket of yellow lemons in one hand, while staring in shock at a red lemon in his other hand. What to do? In the second text, The Waiting Dog, author and illustrator Carolyn and Andrea Beck depict a dog waiting by a mail slot, fantasizing poetically about how he would devour the mail carrier (I sit and wait, and salivate…). Strong student responses are guaranteed! A text with haunting images, The Mysteries of Harris Burdick by Chris Van Allsburg – where each black and white image is accompanied only by a title and caption to suggest a story – can be used as a springboard for telling and writing stories. The only stipulation is that the image makes you think and feel something unusual or mystifying. This paper also investigates specific strategies for supporting writers so that they can produce their own illustrated texts for maximum impact. Beginning with strong mentor texts, students can be shown how to use images and words to effectively communicate their thoughts and feelings.

Location: Aula 3201 (third floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)

Presentation: AELE Team

Language: Spanish / Portuguese (it is indicated in each case)


O projeto leitura e escrita na Educação Infantil: contribuições para a política de formação de professores no Brasil

Mônica Correia Baptista, Vanessa Ferraz Almeida Neves, Maria Fernanda Nunes and Patrícia Corsino, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (BRAZIL)

Language: Portuguese/Spanish

A concepção de Educação como direito do cidadão desde o nascimento foi postulada pela Constituição Federal de 1988 e trouxe consigo o desafio de levar em conta as especificidades do trabalho pedagógico voltado para as crianças menores de seis anos. O aprendizado da linguagem escrita foi um dos elementos a serem problematizados. Diante dos desafios apontados e da urgência de se desenvolverem ações de capacitação de professores, o Ministério da Educação do Brasil, em parceria com três universidades públicas brasileiras, desenvolveu o projeto Leitura e Escrita na Educação Infantil. O objetivo foi o de formular e difundir proposições para o desenvolvimento de práticas pedagógicas de leitura e escrita na Educação Infantil, comprometidas com as especificidades da primeira infância e com o direito da criança à cultura letrada. Buscou articular, do ponto de vista teórico, político, ético e estético, o papel da Educação Infantil na inserção das crianças na cultura escrita, bem como aclarar a relação entre essa inserção e o processo de Alfabetização. Foram realizados cinco seminários que contaram com a participação de pesquisadores brasileiros e internacionais. Desenvolveram-se duas investigações. A primeira analisou práticas educativas, consideradas de qualidade, desenvolvidas, em escolas de Educação Infantil da rede pública. A segunda mapeou as produções acadêmicas entre 1973 e 2013 sobre a temática da leitura e da escrita junto a crianças menores de seis anos. Finalmente, elaborou-se proposta de curso de formação docente, com material didático próprio, cuja autoria contou com especialistas das áreas de linguagem e educação infantil. O projeto incentivou o debate nacional, explicitando diferentes concepções sobre o ensino e a aprendizagem da leitura e da escrita, sobre a identidade da Educação Infantil e sobre o papel dessa etapa educativa frente ao desafio de assegurar às crianças o direito a uma educação de qualidade.


El rol predictivo de la descodificación en la comprensión de textos y de oraciones         

Milagros Tapia Montesinos and Juan Cruz Ripoll, Universidad de Navarra (SPAIN)

Language: Spanish

La descodificación es un proceso esencial e indispensable en la comprensión de textos y de oraciones. El objetivo de la investigación es identificar la influencia que tiene la descodificación en la comprensión de oraciones y en la comprensión de textos. La muestra estuvo conformada por 71 niños y niñas de tercer curso de educación primaria. Se utilizaron diferentes instrumentos de evaluación para medir las habilidades de descodificación, comprensión del lenguaje, comprensión de oraciones y comprensión de textos. Los resultados señalan que las habilidades de descodificación presentan una correlación más alta con la comprensión de oraciones (r=.772) que la que presentan con la comprensión de textos (r=.349). Luego de controlar el efecto de la comprensión del lenguaje, la contribución de la descodificación en la explicación de la comprensión de textos no resultó significativa (2.4%; p=.381) pero sí resultó ser una variable predictora importante de la comprensión de oraciones (38%). El reconocimiento ortográfico es la habilidad que tiene mayor peso en la explicación de la comprensión de oraciones (b=.422), seguida de la fluidez lectora (b=.404). La comprensión de oraciones, medida a través de la Prueba de Estrategias Semánticas, Habilidades sintácticas y Test de Eficiencia Lectora, presentó una correlación positiva y moderada con la comprensión de textos (r =.440). Tras un análisis de regresión, la comprensión de oraciones permitió predecir el 19% (p<.005) de la comprensión de textos. Los resultados nos indican que la descodificación tiene un rol predictivo importante en la comprensión de oraciones en los alumnos del tercer curso de educación primaria.


El proyecto “Educación literaria en la educación infantil”: una experiencia de investigación-acción

Mônica Correia Baptista, Celia Abicalil Belmiro and Vanessa Ferraz Almeida Neves, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (BRAZIL)

Language: Spanish

La inserción de la literatura, en las instituciones de Educación Infantil, como práctica cultural requiere que los docentes sean capaces de seleccionar textos, organizar acervos literarios apropiados a las diferentes franjas etarias, planear y realizar adecuadamente la lectura de textos, estimular a los niños para que se interesen cada vez más por la lectura, definir competencias y capacidades que contribuyan para la formación de los niños como lectores de literatura. La investigación-acción tuve el objetivo de planear, desarrollar y evaluar intervenciones educativas relacionadas con la educación literaria de niños de seis meses a cinco años de edad, en una institución pública de Educación Infantil, en Brasil. Se desarrolló en dos etapas en las que se realizaron observaciones y análisis de prácticas pedagógicas. En la primera, se caracterizó y se analizó el contexto, a través de entrevistas y observaciones. En la segunda etapa, a partir de registros en vídeo, fotografías y diarios de campo se realizaron reuniones técnicas, encuentros de estudio y charlas en las que investigadoras y maestras debatieron la práctica pedagógica y elaboraron estrategias de intervención. Los resultados de la investigación encontraron que las maestras adquirieron competencias para crear y desarrollar situaciones de aprendizaje en las que la lectura literaria se hacía presente. Se apropiaron de criterios de selección, estrategias de elección de libros, organización de acervos y capacidades para desarrollar situaciones de aprendizaje destinadas a la formación del lector de literatura. Se evidenció la necesidad de ampliarse las oportunidades de formación profesional y de incentivar la organización colectiva a través de un proyecto pedagógico que involucre a toda la comunidad escolar.


Ahora sí escribimos: Producción, lectura en voz alta y publicación en Internet de microtextos en Secundaria

Consuelo Allué Villanueva, Public Universidad de Navarra (SPAIN)

Language: Spanish

Planteamos documentar, analizar y explicar la respuesta positiva del alumnado de Secundaria (4º ESO) a la propuesta de desarrollo de las competencias comunicativas mediante la producción individual de microtextos, posterior puesta en común en gran grupo y publicación final en nuestro blog http://mikrotextosblogs.blogspot.com.es/. Esta práctica evidencia como posibles y necesarias nuevas metodologías de aula –que propicien el protagonismo del alumnado y su participación activa en aulas y centros-, y un cambio de paradigma educativo, especialmente urgente en Educación Secundaria. La propuesta procede de un centro multilingüe: idioma vehicular, euskera; lengua de ambiente, castellano; otros idiomas del centro, inglés, francés. Los microtextos se vinculan con Lengua castellana y Literatura. Partimos de la expresión escrita, para relacionarla con las otras competencias comunicativas y la necesidad de aprender a pensar. Seguimos la línea de investigación de las metodologías activas, aprendizaje por competencias y algunos aspectos de la escritura creativa. En concordancia con el actual “juego desestructurado”, proponemos esta “escritura-no-tan-estructurada” que rehúye la dependencia de lo literal. Los resultados más relevantes sugieren que: 1. Escribir microtextos (5 líneas) individual y diariamente, para leerlos en clase al gran grupo, hacer propuestas de mejora y publicarlos en nuestro blog predispone positivamente al alumnado hacia la expresión escrita y sus potencialidades, 2. Nuestra metodología (producción individual, posterior lectura en clase, comentarios y propuestas de mejora, publicación en el blog) da nuevo sentido a estas tareas y producciones, 3. Resultan indispensables temas, propuestas y perspectivas no academicistas que sorprendan y rompan nuestros esquemas, para promover actitudes críticas y creativas, impulsar la reflexión, desautomatizar los conocimientos y los usos, facilitar la reflexión metalingüística y estética, fomentar opiniones diversas y la creatividad, 4. Publicar las producciones en Internet, en nuestro blog público, constituye un gran estímulo.

Location: Aula 3202 (third floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)

Presentation: JEROEN CLEMENS, Reading Association in the Netherlands (NETHERLANDS)

Language: English


The Comparison of Note Taking by Using Keyboard and Pencil with regard to Different Variables    

Abdullah Kaldirim, Dumlupinar University; Kasım YIldirim, Mugla Sitki Kocman University; and Omer Faruk Tavsanli, Uludağ University (TURKEY)

Language: English

The life is evolving very rapidly in 21st century through information and communication technologies (ICTs). Particularly, the developments in ICTs lead to people to save and reach knowledge easily. Digital devices such as laptop, tablet, and smart phones, which are portable and, which enable to people save and protect knowledge, are preferred more compared to pencil and paper. However, it is wondered that does keyboard or the pair of paper-pencil is effective? The present research aimed to explore the effectiveness of keyboard and the pair of paper-pencil on taking note with regard to different variables. A total of 316 pre-service teachers from a public university in Turkey’s Kutahya province were enrolled in the study. In the first phase of the research, the sample of the research was assigned to two groups. One group took notes by use of pencil-paper and another one worked with keyboard. It was asked two groups to take notes while they listened to a video which lasted 20 minutes. After then, the comprehension test including the questions prepared according to the taxonomy of cognitive domain was administered to the participants in the groups. In the second phase of the research, a different video from the previous one was used. It was asked the participants to take notes when they listed to the video as well. After one week duration, the comprehension test related to the video listened and taken notes was administered to the participants in the groups. Before administering the comprehension test, it was asked the participants to review their notes regarding the video. In the third and last phase of the research, it was asked the participants to listen to another vide and takes noted when they listened to the video. After this process, the notes taken by the participants in the groups were transcribed and analyzed according to their contents. For the research findings, statistical and content analyses were employed and the results were discussed through the related scientific literature.


Gains and losses – handwriting verses digital writing when creating narrative text

Helene Dahlström and Lena Boström, Mid-Sweden University Deparment of education (SWEDEN)

Language: English

In this study, we compared three different writing conditions – pen and paper; tablet and tablet with access to speech synthesis. The study was conducted within a class of fourth graders in Sweden. The aim was to examine how these different conditions for writing affected students’ creation of narrative text. The empirical data consists of students’ texts completed with data from participant observations. The texts were analysed in order to capture dimensions of how the students express themselves from different perspectives such as the use of different verbs in terms of doing, being, sensing or talking (process analyse), the text structure and linguistic correctness. Findings show that digital writing with access to speech synthesis played a crucial role in improving students’ writing. This result turned out to be mainly valid for students with Swedish as their second language. When it comes to findings from the process analyse, that examined one aspect of the content of the texts was that processes that describe verbs of being increased when students wrote digitally, regardless of first or second language for the students.


On the Integration of Literacy Acquisition and Digital Media

Konstanze Edtstadler, University College of Teacher Education Styria (AUSTRIA)

Language: English

Children are highly motivated to use computers, tablets, and other mobile devices for writing and reading. Surprisingly, elaborated didactic approaches that take advantage of new technologies in literacy acquisition are not sufficiently implemented. Currently, the application of digital media in spelling acquisition is often limited to practice spelling by using online exercises and/or typing texts on computers. Therefore, a new approach of teaching and learning spelling, writing and reading within a web-based platform language was developed for the German language. On the so called Iderblog-platform (www.iderblog.eu) children aged between 8 and 12 years can write texts, which can be published and consequently read and commented by others. By using the integrated intelligent dictionary, that gives a specific feedback for correcting a mistake without presenting the correct spelling (like a usual auto correction system) children can acquire spelling competence by gaining deeper insight to the system of the orthography in an individually shaped learning process. The reason for this is, that the strategy-based feedback depends on the occurred mistakes and is executed on the words used. To our knowledge no comparable application in any language exists. Therefore, the aim of the presentation is to provide an insight into central aspects of this application, especially concerning the didactic approach, the system-architecture and its usability, and the current limitations of the platform. All these aspects are crucial for integrating digital media and literacy acquisition independently of the concrete language. Therefore, the aim of this presentation is to discuss the possibilities for transferring this prototype to other languages and orthographies by considering the experiences collected so far.


What’s up in digital reading?

Íris Susana Pires Pereira, Cristina Vieira da Silva and Maria Manuel Borges, Instituto da Educação, Universidade do Minho (PORTUGAL)

Language: English

Whether for leisure, educational purposes or in our social relationships, reading on screens has been changing the way we make meaning from texts, and this also applies to children’s first reading experiences, including their initial reading of literature. In fact, in December 2012, The National Literacy Trust applied a survey to examine the technological influence upon 34.910 8 year-old children’s reading abilities in the United Kingdom and found out that the number of children reading ebooks had doubled in the two previous years, that children preferred to read on screen, and that some of them (4 out of 10) also had a tablet or smartphone. A balance between the use of books and digital devices was then recommended reflecting the current ambiguity in the literature as far as the advantages and risks of reading and writing on screen vs. on paper (Miller & Warschauer, 2014). This paper aims at contributing to the clarification of this ambiguity. We identify and discuss three fundamental dimensions of transformation of digital reading, namely multimodality (Kress, 2010), interactivity (Moreno & Mayer, 2007) and interconnectivity (Salmerón & García, 2011), which we characterise and illustrate with reference to The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr Morris Lessmore, by William Joyce (Atheneum Books, 2012). Besides being a strong metaphor of the power of books and literature, this is an impressive and inspiring example of the potential of blending paper books and apps in an effort to promote literature reading among children in the context of the digitalisation of communication. By exploring to the limit the potential affordances of e-reading, this augmented reality app brings the pages of this picture book to life, thus offering itself as an interesting case when the objective is to confront digital reading and reading on paper.

Location: Ground floor, center aisle (Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)

Presentation: PEDRO PULIDO GENES, University Complutense of Madrid

Language: Spanish / Portuguese (it is indicated in each case)


La multialfabetización en el dominio hogar: un mundo lleno de símbolos 

Celia Moreno Morilla, Universidad de Sevilla (SPAIN)

Language: Spanish

La alfabetización en el dominio hogar tiene gran relevancia durante los primeros años de la infancia. Los niños encuentran en el contexto familiar cantidad de estímulos que enfatizan el desarrollo de su alfabetización (Gregory & Williams, 2000). Así, se promueven una serie de aprendizajes informales que forjan la identidad alfabetizadora del niño antes de que se inicie la escolarización reglada (Rowsell & Pahl, 2007; Well, 1986). El papel de las familias en el rendimiento escolar, en general, y en la alfabetización, en particular, ha sido demostrado ampliamente en numerosos estudios desde los años setenta (Bernstein, 1975; Bloom, 1982; Bourdieu & Passeron, 1990). Son numerosas las prácticas y eventos letrados que pueden ser desarrollados junto a las familias. Las prácticas que se desarrollan en el hogar (Marsh, 2005; 2011; Mackey, 2010) configuran el tercer espacio de alfabetización, en el que se incorporan elementos de carácter digital e impreso y tienen lugar discursos multimodales (Hill, 2010; Moje et al., 2004). La alfabetización de los jóvenes lectores y escritores son complejas en este tercer espacio, dada la variedad de códigos y clústeres que ha de interpretar como parte de un discurso multimodal (Bearne, 2005). El desarrollo de este tercer espacio de alfabetización y la naturaleza híbrida de los discursos que se desarrollan en él juegan un importante papel como “contexto mediado y herramientas para el futuro desarrollo social y cognitivo” de los estudiantes (Gutiérrez et al., 1999, p. 92).


El taller del lector: una propuesta para incorporar la biblioteca y los libros al currículo a través de la asignatura de lengua

Almudena Zurdo Garay-Gordóvil and Sarah Seguí Rodríguez, Colegio Nuestra Señora del Pilar, Madrid (SPAIN)

Language: Spanish

Este proyecto pretende introducir en la programación de la asignatura de Lengua de 1º y 2º de la ESO una actividad quincenal en la biblioteca escolar. El formato escogido es el de taller y las sesiones serán animadas por la bibliotecaria y el profesor de Lengua. Los objetivos de este proyecto son los siguientes: *Acercar a los alumnos a la biblioteca escolar y al concepto de biblioteca en general, como un espacio de aprendizaje, ocio y descubrimiento de la lectura y las fuentes de información. *Reservar tiempo y espacio para leer libremente. *Familiarizar a los alumnos con la figura del bibliotecario. *Completar el aprendizaje de diferentes aspectos de la materia relacionadas con el mundo del libro desde un punto de vista lúdico y atractivo. *Promover activamente el desarrollo de las competencias lingüísticas. *Proponer actividades que hagan que los alumnos se impliquen en su propio proceso de aprendizaje, poniendo en juego habilidades y destrezas variadas, que suponen un enriquecimiento con respecto al trabajo de aula. *Favorecer la mejora de la competencia digital de los alumnos. En cada trimestre habrá seis sesiones y se mantendrá una estructura temática similar, que abarca los siguientes aspectos: la biblioteca, el léxico, los libros, los géneros literarios y la escritura creativa. Las sesiones se desarrollarán siguiendo la misma secuencia: entrada y bienvenida, explicación de la sesión, actividad, conclusiones y puesta en común, recomendaciones, lectura individual en silencio. La metodología empleada incluye trabajo cooperativo, inteligencias múltiples y destrezas de pensamiento. La evaluación del taller formará parte de la asignatura de Lengua.


Compartiendo prácticas comunicativas: la Red Virtual de Bibliotecas Escolares de Canarias(Red BIBESCAN)

Expedita Sánchez Sánchez and Iván Carlos Hombre Vega, Bibliotecas Escolares, Canarias (SPAIN); and Yolanda Ortega Moral, Instituto de Educación Secundaria “Jinámar”, Elda (SPAIN)

Language: Spanish

Queremos presentar un póster sobre la Red virtual de Bibliotecas Escolares de Canarias (Red BIBESCAN) de la Consejería de Educación y Universidades del Gobierno de Canarias. La Red BIBESCAN es una red institucional que promueve el intercambio de prácticas en torno a la lectura, la escritura, la oralidad, la competencia informacional y la dinamización de las Bibliotecas Escolares entre el profesorado de los centros docentes públicos de todas las etapas educativas de Canarias, desde Infantil hasta Bachillerato y, en la que están presentes también otras enseñanzas como la Escuela de Adultos o Enseñanzas Artísticas. Además de promover la reflexión en torno a la competencia comunicativa, la Red sirve como espacio único de encuentro; esto es, se ofrece la posibilidad de poder establecer comunicación asíncrona a través de Internet, hecho que facilita la interacción del profesorado debido a la realidad física del territorio canario. Presentaremos la Red BIBESCAN como parte integral del Programa de Lectura y Bibliotecas Escolares de la Consejería de Educación y Universidades y la relación con otras Redes educativas que forman parte del Servicio de Innovación. Asimismo, explicaremos su evolución, su funcionamiento, su estructura, sus componentes y el desarrollo a lo largo del curso escolar. Por otro lado, se incluirá en el póster cómo se llevan a cabo las sesiones presenciales de los coordinadores y coordinadoras responsables en los centros educativos de la Red y se completará con enlaces a las redes sociales. Queremos, en definitiva, mostrar cómo la Red se dinamiza a través grupos de docentes que trabajan de forma colaborativa y que juntos generan conocimiento a partir de las aportaciones propias que se van enriqueciendo con el resto.


En busca del lector del siglo XXI: Las app para niños y jóvenes

Luis Miguel Cencerrado Malmierca,Elisa Yuste Tuero, José Antonio Cordón, Araceli García and Raquel Gómez, Portal AppTK.es (ESPAÑA)

Language: Spanish

La lectura se expande, se diversifica, transita nuevos derroteros y se abre a nuevas propuestas. Nos interesa descubrir y dar a conocer los nuevos materiales de lectura que acercan historias, que proporcionan conocimientos y que desarrollan competencias y destrezas. Por ello, a través de esta contribución queremos compartir con todos los profesionales asistentes a la Conferencia las posibilidades que encierran las aplicaciones. Para ello, proponemos la elaboración de un póster en relación con la lectura de aplicaciones dirigidas a niños y jóvenes. Su contenido estará orientado a dar respuesta a las preguntas que surgen entre padres y madres, docentes, bibliotecarios y otros agentes relacionados con la promoción de la lectura entre el público infantil y juvenil. El póster se plantea como una ayuda para responder a algunas cuestiones tales como: cómo conseguirlas; cuándo y cómo presentárselas a los niños y niñas; qué las caracterizan y cómo aprovecharlas al máximo. En el póster se ofrecerán, de forma sucinta y con apoyos gráficos, diversas informaciones y consejos que estarán estructurados en torno a estos tres bloques de contenido: 1. Con qué empezar: Aspectos que hay que considerar respecto al contenido, la forma de adquisición, seguridad, privacidad y calidad. 2. Cuándo y cómo empezar: Pautas y consejos respecto al tiempo de contacto con los dispositivos electrónicos y los niveles de autonomía según la edad, y las medidas de control parental que se pueden establecer. 3. Qué hacer: Posibilidades múltiples que ofrecen las aplicaciones para buscar y navegar entre sus contenidos, cómo interactuar con ellos y hacer anotaciones, así como las opciones de personalización que pueden ofrecer.


Estratégias Metodológicas para o Ensino de Leitura e Escrita: Desenvolvendo os Níveis de Letramento nos Contos de Grimm

Dayhane Alves Escobar Ribeiro Paes and Marcelo Vitor de Souza Paes, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (BRAZIL)

Language: Portuguese

O ensino de língua portuguesa se constitui em objeto de pesquisa nas últimas décadas com diferentes concepções de língua coexistindo. A motivação dessa pesquisa está centrada em proposta de ensino de nossa língua, pautada na articulação da leitura, da escrita e da análise linguística para o ensino da oralidade e da escrita. Objetiva-se, portanto, reunindo diferentes traduções em português dos contos de Grimm, discutir estratégias metodológicas para o ensino de leitura e de escrita. Baseamo-nos em princípios da linguística textual (KOCH, 1999) e (FARACO, 2015), considerando uma abordagem sociocognitivo-discursiva da referenciação em cada conto selecionado. Objetiva-se discutir os diferentes usos desse fenômeno linguístico, para descrever seus diferentes usos, sua relação com o gênero em estudo, indicando sua produtividade em abordagens textuais para o ensino de língua materna.


Círculo de Lectores, clave del éxito

Raymond González Girón and Iridiadas Mendieta, Ministerio de Educación (PANAMA); and Brenda Bairnals, Meduca (PANAMA)

Language: Spanish

El Círculo de Lectores es una metodología constructiva que debe ser aplicada en cada centro escolar, para la obtención de un aprendizaje significativo de la lengua oral y escrita. Por tal motivo, encaminamos nuestro trabajo expositivo para participar en este importante evento, con el tema descrito antes, a través de un póster. En el cual desarrollamos la experiencia obtenida con la puesta en práctica de esta herramienta. El póster en sí mismo, muestra, paso a paso, la introducción, objetivo, desarrollo de las actividades programadas (ejecución), la conclusión o logros obtenidos. Actualmente en nuestro país (Panamá), es creciente el número de estudiantes con dificultades en el aprendizaje del lenguaje. Razón por la cual, hemos venido trabajando en esta propuesta, que con el aval del Comité Organizador, optamos por presentar y/o exponer en el Foro que dignamente dirigen, para mostrarle a gran parte de los colegas, que el círculo de lectores promueve: cambios, aprendizajes, creatividad, desarrollo cognitivo, crecimiento personal.


Contribución del teatro al aprendizaje de la lengua

Ana Gutiérrez Blanco, Instituto de Educación Secundaria “Hug Roger III” Lleida (SPAIN)

Language: Spanish

Este trabajo versa sobre la contribución del teatro al aprendizaje de las lenguas y pretende describir una experiencia didáctica teatral, implementada en el 4º curso de ESO durante el curso 2015-16. Se parte de la convicción de que el teatro es una herramienta didáctica muy eficaz en la educación secundaria, porque mejora las competencias lingüísticas de los alumnos y porque es altamente motivadora, lo que es indispensable para que el aprendizaje se produzca. Su carácter integrador e interdisciplinario hace posible que se relacione con la mayor parte de los contenidos curriculares. Esta experiencia forma parte del proyecto transversal de investigación para 4ª de ESO, que tenía como objetivo la final la elaboración de un cortometraje de ficción. La han llevado a cabo un grupo de alumnos, el equipo de actores y actrices, que supuestamente ha recibido el encargo de escribir y representar una obra teatral a partir del cañamazo de El criado de dos amos, de Carlo Goldoni, a la manera del género de la comedia del arte. La primera tarea que se les asignó fue la escritura del guion teatral, que presentaron en dos lenguas, castellano y catalán. Posteriormente, se escenificaron y grabaron algunos fragmentos del texto teatral, en diferentes localizaciones de la Toscana y de nuestro municipio, Sort (Lleida), Estas grabaciones se incluyeron en el cortometraje que elaboraron los alumnos de 4º de ESO para su proyecto final. De la implementación de esta propuesta se concluye que el diseño de actividades motivadoras, como las teatrales, propicia la creatividad de los estudiantes y, consecuentemente, mejora sus habilidades lingüísticas. La experiencia es, pues, una buena muestra de los beneficios del teatro como herramienta didáctica.

WEDNESDAY, 5 JULY

Location: Faculty of Education – University Complutense of Madrid

C Parallel sessions (Wednesday, 5 July – from 9.00 a.m. to 10.00 a.m.): MEETING WITH SPECIAL RAPPORTEURS 

Leer más sobre Marijn Brouckaert

Special Rapporteur: Marijn Brouckaert, Dutch-speaking public library of the City of Brussels (BELGIUM)

My experience with Shared Reading: Prisons, schools and libraries
Shared reading combines reading aloud and moderation/dialogue techniques to create encounters between people. I have used this method in jails, in school context with children and young adults and in a Youth Care Centre. The meetings of this multilingual and multicultural groups illustrate how lack of vocabulary can enrich the reading of a text, teach how letting young people play with fire encourages them to read, and reveal the effect of a bringing table cloth into a male prison.
During this session I would like to share some experiments that are being carried out in Brussels and Belgium to bring this method to libraries and schools.

Presentation: IVAN GARCÍA NUÑEZ, University Complutense of Madrid


  • Location: Aula 2531 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)
  • Language: English
 

Read more about Jeroen Clemens

Special Rapporteur: JEROEN CLEMENS, Reading Association in the Netherlands (NETHERLANDS) 

Literacy in a digital age: An interesting and big challenge for (language) teachers

Internet is this generation’s defining technology for reading, writing and learning. Research shows that the ability for reading, writing and other ways of communicating (online literacies) and for learning online is a crucial competence. We know that a lot of students are not very good at this. For reading and writing online one needs new and additional skills and strategies, above this needed for lineair, paper, texts. The urgency to include this in education has been emphasized frequently at national and international levels. But a lot of studies show that online literacies are not a part of the language curriculum nowadays, nor of curricula of other subjects. Nor do the educational textbooks or teacher training institutes pay much attention to online literacies. This means that we, (language) teachers, have to be pro-active and adapt and expand our definition of literacy and include online literacies into our curriculum and lesson plans. Lets do it ourselves, lets develop, try-out and research. I would like to discuss this new definition of literacy, the new skills and strategies needed and discuss different ways to work on this, especially in teacher development teams. I also hope to have an interesting discussion with all of you, exchange our knowledge and experiences and build new partnerships between teachers who really want to make a difference and work for the students in the 21st century.  

Presentation: ELENA BERMEJO GONZÁLEZ, University Complutense of Madrid


  • Location: Aula 2532 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)
  • Language: English

Read more about Alan Crawford

Special Rapporteur: Alan Crawford, California State University, Los Angeles (USA)

Bilingual/Trilingual Education in Central Asia, Africa, the Caucasus, Eastern Europe, Latin America, and the USA: Major Concepts and Issues
The purpose of this interactive workshop is to share concepts and strategies from bilingual and  trilingual education programs in Kazakhstan, Georgia, Latvia, Ghana, Peru, and the U.S. As concepts and strategies are introduced by the presenter, participants will be invited to contribute their own experiences in their countries or other countries with trilingual and/or bilingual education.
The presenter will share program details about each of the following concepts and strategies and invite participants to share their own experiences with them:Additive vs. subtractive programs; maintenance vs. transitional models; Communicative approaches to L2 and L3 instruction (recommended by CLIL); Thematic vs. grammatical curricula; use of conversation posters; Organizing the place of reading instruction in the sequence of introduction of languages; Sheltered (scaffolded) instruction in language instruction and in the content areas (CLIL and SIOP); Translanguaging (the use of L1 in L2 and L3 classrooms, language and content areas); code switching; Use of the preview/review team teaching strategy in content classrooms; Questions and continued discussion with participants

Presentation: OLIVER BECHARA O’HARE, University Complutense of Madrid


  • Location: Aula Magna (ground floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)
  • Language: English

Read more about Eufimia Tafa

Special Rapporteur: Eufimia Tafa, University of Crete (GREECE)

Improving children’s understanding of story structure through story retelling

This presentation describes the implementation of an intervention program to train kindergarten children in story retelling and to examine whether this training helped them to understand the story structure. Thirty-five children, aged 5-6 years old, in two kindergarten classrooms were trained in story retelling once a week for five months. During the program, 17 well-structured story books were read aloud, and children practised retelling stories at seven levels. All books had an enjoyable, age-appropriate plot, a clearly presented story structure and illustrations that corresponded to the story’s events. Results showed that the children understood almost all the story elements, were able to retell the story in sequence, and explained and commented on the characters’ actions and reactions. During the presentation the discussion will focus on story retelling activities that teachers developed and implemented for making children better understand the story structure.

Presentation: SANDRA MORA

  • Location: Aula 3201 (third floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)
  • Language: English

Special Rapporteur: José Julio Vélez Sainz, University Complutense of Madrid (SPAIN)

Read more about José Julio Vélez

Theater, politics and literacy
Two complementary critical traditions have analyzed how theater has served as means for literacy. On the one hand, pedagogist have utilized drama as a facilitator of learning. Since M. Sendak´s classic Where the Wild Things Are (1963) have arisen an important number of works that emphasize the role of role of theater as a means to language-building (McMaster, 1998), as toll for creative writing (Beehner, 1990; McNaughton, 1997; Schneider & Jackson 2000; Crumpler & Schneider 2002), as formation of readership (Martinez, 1993; Woodson 1999; Alber & Foil 2003) and as model for intercultural teaching (Saltz & Johnson 1974). Independently, several purely theatrical traditions have disposed that drama as an art, has a civic duty in which the formation of citizens is primordial. This formation inevitably understands theater as an agent of literacy. European currents of political theater following the path of Erwin Piscator and Bertolt Brecht or, in the Spanish case, the 1920´s pedagogical missions, underscore theater´s social functions and its capacity to create critical subjects. There is a Latinoamerican trend based upon Augusto Boal´s “theater of the oppressed” of Paulo Freire´s “pedagogy of the oppressed” that attempts to create awareness of actors, technicians and public with the end to form them critically and introduce them in what Lacan termed the imaginary of power. This necessarily involves their inclusion in literacy. Some of these notions are already latent in popular theater, agit-prop and psychodrama. In this conference, I will update the fundamental parameters of those theatrical trends that exemplify theater as a means of learning (and future) and literacy. I will present some specific examples of contemporary staging of the classics that attempt to use them as means of learning and empowermen.

Presentation: SARA GÓMEZ, Spanish Reading and Writing Association

  • Location: Aula 3202 (third floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)
  • Language: English

C Parallel sessions (Wednesday, 5 July – from 10.00 a.m. to 11.30 a.m.): WORKSHOPS

Rapporteur at thworkshop:

KRISHNA CART, Young Scholars Circle (USA)

Presentation: JOANA MONTES JUAREZ, docente (SPAIN)

Language: English

Location: Aula 1202 – computer room (first floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)


With the advent of technology, teachers need to embed digital and media texts into reading and writing workshops and create several venues and opportunities to engage students to be digitally literate. This workshop will hopefully equip and expose classroom teachers, specialists and literacy coaches on the hidden instructional value of multimodal texts and in using varied digital tools and multimodal media in reading and writing workshops. The objective of this workshop is to inspire teachers to authentically embed digital and media tools and some multimodal texts to heighten students’ interests and to help them become digitally literate in this “techy” world. Reading & Writing Workshop Framework Model. We will briefly talk about the reading and writing workshop framework so participants can have a perspective of where anchor, mentor, and independents texts would fit in. Using Digital and Multimodal Texts as Anchor and Mentor Texts. In this segment, we will explore some multimodal texts (songs, videos, play, advertisements, speeches, etc.) as anchor texts where teachers can draw their lessons for the next few days, just like the way we use interactive read aloud. Teaching Reading Comprehension Skills Using Digital and Multimodal Texts.We will explore how to use some digital and multimodal texts to specifically teach some reading comprehension skills like inference, text structure, character’s motivation, etc. The author will deliberately show how to target small skills from a unit of study and based on what she observed about her students, so participants can see the importance of zooming into small skills in the focus lessons. Embedding Digital and Media Literacy in Writing Workshops – In this segment, the focus is more on critiquing and analyzing multimodal texts. The author will model two sample multimodal texts to specifically target some writing skills like author’s craftsmanship, lead, ideas, etc. Participants will be given a list of resources to choose from so they can create their own writing workshop focus lessons/conference lessons embedding digital literacy. We will also explore some resources where teachers can publish their own students writing in the internet through various forms like website, blogs, Google sites and e-Books (Laird, 2015). Digital and Medial Tools for Collaborative Work, Independent Work and Classroom Management Exploration of some digital and media resources that teachers can use immediately in their classrooms for collaborative and independent work as well as for classroom management.

Rapporteur at thworkshop:

JENNIFER LINDENAUER, George Mason University (USA)

Language: English

Presentation: AELE Team

Location: Aula 2532 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)


How do children bring their formal educational experiences to bare on their informal play experiences and in what contexts do they bring their at home, out-of-school play experiences to school to support literacy development and meaning making? When my daughter was a first grader she and her sister would make graphs about their classmates’ favorite things. This was something fun they came up with to do together. This formal academic school activity had become part of their at home play. Did their at home play experiences seep into their formal academic experiences in the same way? How can this kind of fluid transaction in the context of play be harnessed by educators to support literary development through knowledge construction (Massey, 2012), and third space (Dyson, 1997). Play, which has many definitions may be defined to include role-play, fantasy play, dramatic play, and the re-enactment of stories, and has been established as a valuable learning context in early childhood settings (Neman & Roskos, 1983; Morrow, 1990; Pellegrini & Galda, 1993, Roskos & Christie, 2011). According to Pellegrini (1980) symbolic play seems to predict later writing. Conversations and negotiations surrounding play impact later reading through oral language development and vocabulary (Pellegrini, 1980; Pellegrini & Galda 1993; Han, Moore, Vukelich & Buell, 2010). Additionally, in early childhood settings, play contexts have also been linked to children’s increased learning about the functions of print (Morrow, 1990; Neuman & Roskos, 1993; Vukelich, 1994, Snow et al. 2015). While play has been established as a viable and important context in literacy development it remains difficult to define and study (Rosko & Christie, 2001) and therefore for teachers to implement and utilize in a systematic way. However, through careful planning and sensitivity to children’s developmental needs, play, dramatic play, and role-play may be used in supporting a child’s literacy development in reading and writing (Adomat, 2012; Ghiso, 2013) by providing a context to integrate home and child culture with academic school culture (Dyson, 1997; Lysakar, 2010) that can be teacher supported. Join me for a workshop that will focus on bringing out-of-school literacies and home culture to school through the intentional facilitation of play contexts and third space to support literacy development. Explore why and how teachers, parents or out-of-school time educators can use play, role play, and dramatic play to support children in their literacy development. The workshop will focus on reading, writing and oral language development and is based on a critical literature review that offers insights into teacher facilitation of play contexts and teacher experience. I will present the literature review along with instructional practices that utilize play contexts to support early literacy which may be relevant to a range of international contexts.

Rapporteur at thworkshop:

JAMES NAGELDINGER, Elmira College (USA)

Language: English

Presentation: AELE Team

Location: Aula 2533 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)


Reading and writing in today’s society is a challenge for many of our students. Their world is inundated by print media from food labels to the instructions on our various screens. What often gets overlooked are things educators can to do make our students not only better readers of the text, but better readers of the world as well. Paulo Freire suggests education is always a political process that can never be divorced from pedagogy. (Freire, 1985) Gaining empathy and perspective should be cornerstones in any reading instructional environment. However, many students currently struggle to understand basic text. And too often, current remediation and pedagogy focuses on discrete decoding skills at the expense of opportunities to develop critical thinking that will help prepare them to be productive members of a literate society. There is a body of research that correlates repeated oral reading to silent reading comprehension through increases in reading fluency and a relationship between how we read aloud and how we read silently. One effective way to increase reading fluency is through the use of Readers Theatre. Reading scripts with a performance goal entails close reading, an essential literacy skill. Often current application of Readers Theatre falls short of its potential to bolster comprehension and critical thinking. The use of content rich text in creating Readers Theatre scripts can serve to improve reading comprehension though increased fluency while reinforcing important content area learning. Historically, Readers Theatre scripts have been focused on either the efferent aspect of the literacy form or the aesthetic, but rarely both. Script creation has often been to either provide students with an avenue for fluency development, a pleasant diversion, or a way to deliver content area learning while developing critical thinking skills. Subsequently, most scripts sacrifice either the framework for fluency development, the inclusion of content rich material leading to higher level thinking, or a structure necessary to create a meaningful work of Readers Theater. In this hands-on minds-on workshop, participants will be guided through the process of adapting Math, Science, Social Studies, and/or Language Arts content into authentic scripts and how best to utilize the power of Readers Theatre to increase fluency, deliver content and stimulate critical thinking skills. Attention will be given to content choice, script production, and the most effective techniques for rehearsal and performance.

Rapporteurs at thworkshop:

  • JIENING RUAN, University of Central Oklahoma (USA)
  • SYLVIA HURST, University of Central Oklahoma (USA)
  • PRISCILA GRIFFITH, University of Oklahoma (USA)

Presentation: AELE Team

Language: English

Location: Aula 2534 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)


The 21 st century witnesses an overwhelming presence of digital technologies. In western countries, many children are digital natives who are familiar with various forms of digital technologies, and they are proficient users of the technologies. Digital technologies have greatly expanded the toolkit of writing from traditional writing utensils such as pens, pencils, markers, and crayons to include new tools such as personal computers and word processors, handheld mobile devices, and various online programs and apps for writing. In particular, Web 2.0 technologies (e.g., Facebook, Tweeter, blogs, etc.) also enable people to share their thoughts and writing in connected, public spaces and therefore transforms writing from a solitary act to a collaborative, communal act. The digital age has also brought changes to the processes and products of writing (Hicks, 2015). Writing in the 21 st century demonstrates noticeable differences from traditional writing and includes important features of multimodality, intertextuality, and interactivity. In addition, writing is increasingly geared toward public audiences and collaboration (Beach, Anson, Breuch, & Swiss, 2008). According to the National Commission on Writing in America’s Schools and Colleges (2003), “writing today is not a frill for the few, but an essential skill for the many” (p. ii). Writing is a complex intellectual activity requiring students “to stretch their minds, sharpen their analytical capabilities, and make valid and accurate distinctions” within and across content…It is “how students connect the dots in their knowledge” (National Commission on Writing, 2003, p. 13-14). Furthermore, students who develop strong writing skills at an early age acquire available tools for learning, communication, and self-expression (Graham et al., 2012). It is imperative that teachers critically examine the impact of digital technologies on student writing and determine how they can be used to support and transform the teaching of writing. Curran and Wetherbee (2014) identified several shifts that are occurring in teaching style and learner behavior in today’s classrooms. The shifts from consumption to production, localized to global, and isolated to connected are especially relevant to the teaching and learning of writing. In this workshop, the presenters will provide background information on writing with old and new technologies and the ways to transition from traditional to digital writing. The participants will engage in several interactive, hands-on digital writing activities using iPads.

Rapporteur at thworkshop:

ELFRIEDE WITSCHEL, University College of Teacher Education (AUSTRIA)

Presentation: AELE Team

Language: English

Location: Aula 2401 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)


In the workshop participants are encouraged to try out an arrangement of tasks that connects reading, writing and speaking. They, as learners, are the central players and are asked to put the focus on text in two ways: firstly the one they read and secondly the one they write. In phase 1, participants will work with an arrangement of tasks individually and cooperatively, discussing the theoretical ideas the tasks are based on (cf. Bräuer & Schindler, 2011). They will not only again become aware of the variety of reading strategies students might need and be asked to practice in class, but also of the importance of the writing process and how scaffolding and cooperative writing can facilitate writing a longer text. In phase two of the workshop they will be encouraged to design tasks for their own class or groups of students that help learners read and write texts. In order to be able to do this, participants are kindly asked to bring along shorter texts in the languages they want their students to study in class, such as short literary texts, newspaper articles, academic texts etc. These texts are supposed to serve as students’ starting points for writing a longer text. The tasks can be designed for lower and upper secondary level as well as university level. Summary: Phase 1: Participants get to know the idea of an arrangement of tasks by working with a short English factual text (upper secondary level). They are asked to, individually as well as cooperatively, repeatedly refer to selected passages and finally produce their own texts. This process is accompanied and followed by a metacognitive analysis. Phase 2: Participants take their own texts and design tasks in their mother tongues or preferred languages for their own groups of learners. Target groups: teachers (secondary level) and teacher trainers.

Rapporteur at thworkshop:

LAURIE BAUER, University of Cincinnati Blue Ash College (USA)

Presentation: AELE Team

Language: English

Location: Aula 3201 (third floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)


This workshop will addresses current issues surrounding strategy use in secondary and postsecondary reading instruction with a focus on expanding current beliefs on what is included in an appropriate and effective reading strategy at this level. Emphasis will be placed on strategies that aid in making the students’ metacognitvely aware of their reading and the strategies that they use or fail to use throughout this process. Any educator would argue that in order for a student to be successful they must be aware of their learning and the process they follow when taking on an academic task. This idea of being metacognitively aware has been discussed in the field of education at a variety of age and developmental levels as well as with English language learners. This workshop will address ways to make students more aware of their reading and understanding of text in addition to helping them realize that what they do during reading ultimately affects their comprehension. Becoming metacognitively aware is essential and needs to be accomplished so students can successfully negotiate through texts and begin to develop a deeper understanding. Participants will receive information on effective strategy instruction as well as participate in hands-on activities that can be replicated in a variety of educational settings.

Rapporteurs at thworkshop:

  • GERALDINE BALZER
  • ALLISON BALABUCH
  • ANDREA FOSTER
  • LAUREN FRODSHAM
  • COURTNEY HALL
  • KATE MCKONNON
  • ANGELA WARD

University of Saskatchewan (CANADA)

 KATHERINE O’CONNOR, Arbutus Global Middle School (CANADA)

Presentation: AELE Team

Language: English

Location: Aula 3202 (third floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)


In this workshop, participants will learn alongside teachers who work with students aged 12-17 years to enhance their understanding of social justice. The presenters will engage participants in both discussion and practical activities. As part of an ongoing national study in Canada, teachers implemented strategies for social justice teaching in their classrooms. Participating in this workshop will enable educators, living in an age of increased migration, to explore the opportunities and challenges of building respect across differences of culture, ethnicity, and religion. Schools have a particular role in encouraging learners to consider multiple cultural perspectives and to become global citizens. One part of that role is to provide learners with inspiring and thought-provoking literature that provides students from the dominant culture a window into the world of others and enables marginalized students to see their own lives reflected in the chosen texts. The researchers will introduce the theoretical underpinnings of the study and describe the demographic and cultural contexts of the Canadian provinces of Saskatchewan and British Columbia. We will share strategies for choosing books that have the potential to enhance students’ understanding of social justice issues in classroom and community. Participants in the workshop will be encouraged to read and respond to the books themselves; a book list will also be provided for those interested. Classroom teachers who are participants in the research study will describe and model the social justice pedagogies they have been using in their classrooms, and workshop participants will be invited to share their own ideas and experiences. The presenters are all participants in a national Canadian study where teachers met regularly as inquiry groups to read and discuss children’s and young adult literature, and to develop and share teaching ideas based on these books. The participating teachers worked together with the researchers to explore postcolonial theory and social justice pedagogies and the ways in which these theories could be realized in their classrooms. The workshop provides an opportunity for participants to engage in thoughtful discussions and challenging ideas in an era when tensions around migration and nationalism are part of our students’ lives.

Rapporteur at thworkshop:

MURRAY GADD, University of Auckland (NEW ZELAND)

Presentation: AELE Team

Language: English

Location: Aula 3301 (third floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)


This presentation will identify what a small but purposefully selected set of highly effective New Zealand teachers (n=9) did in authentic learning settings to promote higher than anticipated outcomes in writing for a set of upper primary and middle-school students (n=210). Quantitative and qualitative analysis of observed teacher practice in relation to learner gains data generated a connected set of indicators (namely, some key dimensions of effective practice and related instructional strategies) that are strongly associated with optimum student achievement during the study. Teacher effectiveness data were analysed in relation to eight dimensions of effective practice as generated from a critical reading of research literature (1995-2016) on effective writing instruction: Expectations; Learning Goals; Learning Tasks; Direct Instruction; Responding to Learners; Motivation and Challenge; Organisation and Management; Self-regulation. Analysis suggested that effective teachers of writing employ all dimensions in strategic combination with each other. The apparent effectiveness of each dimension may well be contingent on its inter-connectedness to other dimensions within the same pedagogical context. But analysis also suggested a particularly strong association between the proficient operation of two dimensions (Learning Tasks; Direct Instruction) and learner gains over time. Self-regulation also emerged from the analysis as the dimension with the greatest operational variance between teachers. In addition, an analysis of related instructional strategies suggested that effective teachers of writing employ an inter-connected range of pedagogical actions in a strategic and flexible way. But it particularly suggested that the most effective of their instructional writing actions and activities are those that: (1) are regarded as purposeful by students; (2) include meaningful opportunities for student involvement; (3) are explicit and direct; (4) are differentiated in terms of student needs; (5) lead to opportunities for independence and self-regulation by students as developing writers. Findings in the study applied to strategies for generating higher than anticipated gains by all students in writing, including cohorts most at risk of under-achievement. But some differentiation of strategies appears to be necessary for achievement by under-achieving cohorts, particularly within the dimensions of Learning Tasks and Direct Instruction.

Rapporteur at thworkshop: —-

Location: Room 3401 (third floor)


Rapporteurs at thworkshop:

  • TRACEY PATE
  • DEBORAH FRIZZA

Mentone Grammar School (AUSTRALIA)

Presentation: AELE Team

Language: English

Location: Aula 3407 (third floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)


How does a school cultivate a growth culture and maintain a focus on improving student literacy? How does one say to a group of long term teaching staff that we are not achieving the results in literacy, nor have we longitudinally, that our student data says we should be achieving? Who are the champions of literacy in this school who can help lead a new whole school approach to teaching literacy? Where do we find the expertise to guide us on our journey? How do we get the Principal alongside as a major supporter in the quest to improve a changed approach to teaching literacy? Who are the other major partners needed to play a role in both initiating and sustaining a change that ensures all of our students have access to a high quality literacy program? Our journey is about literacy in the classroom that encompasses best practice teaching and learning, but it’s also about building capacity, educating parents and making literacy accessible to all. This workshop will ask the questions: where is your school going, where is it now and how will you get there? The workshop will incorporate a summary of Mentone Grammar’s journey including the change management that helped create and sustain a new approach to literacy, ensuring equality of opportunity for all in the school community. The evidence-based approach taken by the school will be explored and reflection on participants’ own organisations encouraged. The interactive nature of this workshop will continue with a demonstration of a sample lesson that Mentone Grammar used as part of its Teaching and Learning Evenings for parents, which was designed to help parents feel more included in the teaching and learning experiences of their children. The lesson will outline how literacy, pedagogy and leadership can be powerful factors in the quest for equity in our classrooms and learning communities. Participants in this workshop will be invited to consider how these factors can be adapted to create a cohesive approach to literacy awareness in their own work.

 11.30 a.m. Coffee Break / Performance

C Parallel sessions (Wednesday, 5 July – from 12.00 a.m. to 1.45 p.m.): ROUND TABLES / SYMPOSIUMS

Presentation of early literacy methods and materials in German-, French-, English- and Hebrew and Arabic- speaking contexts  

Presenters:

  • EITHNE KENNEDY, School of Language, Literacy Education, Dublin City University (IRELAND)
  • PATRICIA SCHILLINGS,  University of Liège (BELGIUM) ) 
  • DENNIS KURZON , University of Haifa (ISRAEL)
  • GERRY SHIEL , Educational Research Centre, St Patrick’s Campus, Dublin (IRELAND)

Symposium Chair: RENATE VALTIN, Humbolt University (GERMANY)

Language: English

Location: Sala de conferencias (second floor, Faculty of Education, University Complutense of Madrid)


No comparative studies exist about the initial phases of reading and writing instruction in the first weeks and months of school when children are taught the alphabetic code. Especially little is known about the initial phases of reading instruction in the first weeks and months of school. Do children start with letters, words, or texts? How are grapheme-phoneme correspondences taught (if at all)? Is the first vocabulary controlled for orthographic regularities (in languages with deep orthographies) so that they are decodable? Are there differences between countries whose languages have deep and shallow orthographies? How are the first pages of reading primers (reading scheme books/basal readers) organized? What is the relationship between the teaching of reading and writing? This symposium is being organized by the International Development in Europe Committee (IDEC) of the International Literacy Association (ILA) and the Federation of European Literacy Associations (FELA). Researchers and practitioners will present early literacy methods/materials in the teaching of various languages and countries. These are likely to include at least: Germany, English in Ireland, French in Belgium, and Hebrew and Arabic in Israel. After these presentations the conceptual and pedagogical models underlying various instructional methods and the questions which arise from them will be discussed.

Discussants:

  • ANDRÉ C. MOREAU, Université du Québec, Outaouais (CANADA)
  • NANCY GRANGER, Université du Québec, Trois-Rivières (CANADA)
  • LAURE MINASSIAN, Université de Caen (FRANCE)
  • MYRIAM FONTAINE, Université du Québec, Montréal (CANADA)
  • BRIGITTE STANKÉ, Université de Montréal (CANADA)
  • FANNIE L´ABBÉ, Université du Québec, Outaouais (CANADA)
  • MELANIE DUTEMPLE, Université du Québec, Outaouais (CANADA)
  • MAGALI JEANNIN, University of Caen-Normandy, ESPE (FRANCE)
 Symposium Chair: NANCY GRANGER

Presentation: TAMARA MORATO MORATILLA (SPAIN)

Language: French

Location: Aula 2531 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)


La 20th European Conference on Literacy 2017 nous invite à réfléchir sur comment Travailler ensemble pour encourager l’équité en matière de littératie en mobilisant nos communautés pour ainsi améliorer la communication entre les cultures et l’échange d’expériences et de connaissances nouvelles en recherche. Dans cet esprit de travailler ensemble, rappelons qu’en francophonie, le concept de littératie a connu différentes époques et désigne les compétences à lire et à écrire, première conceptualisation (Pierre, 1994 ; Hébert et Lépine, 2012). Puis au fil des travaux de recherche, ce terme intègre d’autres dimensions, dont la capacité à communiquer (Lafontaine et Pharand, 2015). Cette nouvelle façon de désigner la littératie s’inscrit dans un courant qui dépasse l’écrit (lire-écrire) et ainsi ouvre la voie à diverses formes de pratique (usages) communicationnelles et nouvelles connaissances issues de la recherche. Cette évolution fait écho, pour la personne, à l’appropriation de l’oral et de l’écrit dont les liens sont étayés ; mais aussi elle fait écho aux rapports avec et entre les personnes, les milieux et les communautés. De cette perspective anthropologique, la littératie s’articule autour d’un socle commun de l’usage de langages convoquant des dimensions linguistiques, cognitives et sociales (Barré-De Miniac, 2003). Ces dimensions se modulent selon une certaine réalité écologique (Berger et Desrochers, 2011). Les recherches en littératie mettent en valeur une vision compréhensive de l’être humain, de sa capacité à interagir avec les milieux/communautés à l’usage de moyens et supports de langages pour optimiser le potentiel de chacun dans une visée de participation sociale et d’une contribution citoyenne (Moreau, Hébert, Lépine et Ruel, 2013). Ainsi, au terme de leur recension, ces chercheurs ont défini la littératie comme la capacité de lire, d’écrire et de communiquer efficacement, avec différents supports afin de se développer et de fonctionner dans le quotidien en réalisant ses buts et en exploitant son potentiel. Loin d’être fixe, cette définition est en évolution au regard des nouvelles connaissances; à cet égard, le RÉSEAU québécois sur la littératie [1] (Lacelle, Lafontaine, Moreau et Laroui, 2016) apporte un éclairage plus large en proposant que le concept de littératie réfère à la capacité d’une personne, d’un milieu et d’une communauté à comprendre et à communiquer de l’information par le langage sur différents supports pour participer activement à la société dans différents contextes. Comme composante commune, la capacité d’une personne ou d’un milieu, d’une communauté, désigne les aptitudes à mobiliser des ressources qui permettent de réaliser des activités, d’atteindre des buts et de développer son plein potentiel. Cette capacité se traduit par le pouvoir d’exercer des actions et des activités, d’assumer des fonctions sociales et de jouer un rôle de citoyen; alors que la capacité d’un milieu (agents humains et physiques) ou d’une communauté (activités humaines) réfère au pouvoir de ces environnements d’agir sur la littératie. Dans cette visée, comprendre et communiquer de l’information supposent la mobilisation de ressources (connaissances et compétences) cognitives, linguistiques, graphiques, affectives, expérientielles, culturelles et techniques pour décoder, lire, écouter, se représenter, réfléchir, interpréter, sélectionner, analyser, évaluer, s’exprimer, interagir, créer, produire, diffuser, critiquer et résoudre des problématiques au quotidien. En plus de travaux sur la définition de la littératie en francophonie, des chercheurs et praticiens se sont également intéressés au comment promouvoir et favoriser cette capacité des personnes ou des milieux/communautés. À cet égard, lors du dernier colloque organisé par l’Équipe de recherche en littératie et inclusion (ÉRLI) (Congrès de l’Association francophone pour le savoir [ACFAS], 2016), les conférenciers et participants ont discuté des défis liés au rehaussement des compétences en littératie des jeunes adultes et du comment répondre à cet enjeu social prioritaire québécois. Ces communications ont mis en évidence l’importance de considérer les niveaux de littératie des adultes et les défis dans la formation et dans l’intégration au travail de ces adultes dans une perspective d’inclusion sociale; perspective pouvant être comprise dans le sens d’équité sociale et, de manière plus précise, d’équité en matière de littératie. Dans un esprit de Travailler ensemble pour encourager l’équité en matière de littératie et au regard de différentes définitions/composantes de la littératie, nous souhaitons mobiliser les équipes de chercheurs, étudiants et praticiens afin de faire un état des lieux des retombées de la littératie sur les personnes issues de différents groupes, ou sur les milieux ou communautés : l’apport théorique et des méthodologies de recherche peuvent être mises à contribution. Plus précisément, a) de quelle façon une compréhension plus fine de la littératie influence vos choix en recherche ; et b) comment ces recherches ou méthodologies trouvent-elles écho au niveau théorique et dans la pratique ? Ce symposium se déroule sur trois sessions 1,45 heure : a) session 1 – Littératie apports théoriques et méthodologiques ; b) session 2 – Littératie et résultats de recherche ; c) Littératie et inclusion. [1] Réseau de plusieurs chercheurs québécois sous la direction de Lacelle et al. (2016)

Discussants:

  • JUNSABURO KAMITANI, Kagoshima University (JAPAN)
  • SACHIKO ADACHI, Niigata University (JAPAN)
  • KAZUAKI IIDA, Utsunomiya University (JAPAN)
  • YUJI FUJIMORI, Shinshu University (JAPAN)
  • ASATO YOSHINAGA, Kokugakuin University (JAPAN)

Roundtable Chair: JUNSABURO KAMITANI

Presentation: ELENA BERMEJO GONZÁLEZ, University Complutense of Madrid

Language: English

Location: Aula 2532 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)


Historically, literacy education in a country’s main language(s) has profoundly helped democratization of that country. However, for the international era of the 21st century, it is necessary to think about literacy education in a more global sense. The literacy education of Japan is affected by the educational setting in Europe and America. Against this background, the purpose of this roundtable is to clarify the current situation and concerns regarding literacy education at the levels of theory, practice, and history, through a comparison between Japan and countries in Europe and America. We hope, through this roundtable, to uncover prospective future directions for education and literacy research for a global society. Five Japanese researchers will each give present on specific areas related to literacy education. Presentations: (1)Reading activities of Japanese schools in the 21st century based on Spanish reading promotion activities “Animación a la Lectura” which was introduced to Japan at the end of the 20th century. A multiple number of cases are studied to examine what kind of educational programs on reading are actually being practiced using the Spanish reading activities as well as its effect and problems. (2) Reading as school culture: comparison of educational activities on reading in primary schools in Japan and the U.K. The difference and commonality of the educational activities on reading in primary schools in Japan and the U.K. are considered from the perspective of their contribution to the formation of school culture in respective countries. (3) Comparison of teaching strategies in reading instruction: An examination of the transition from preschool to elementary school in Japan, Belgium and the U.S. The transition from one school to an upper school will be clarified through commonalities and differences found in teaching strategies in reading instructions in Japan, Belgium and the U.S., and consideration is made on its advantages and disadvantages. (4) Research of modern literature classes in secondary education: A comparison between Japan and Austria. Few modern literary works such as novels appear in Japanese language textbooks in junior and senior schools in Japan. A consideration is made on how to secure opportunities for students to encounter with modern literature in secondary education. In Austrian secondary education, textbooks which introduce works by Austrian authors are created and used during classes and teachers’ training. A consideration is made based on this Australian case. (5) Education by writing: Seikatsu Tsuzurikata (“Composition Based on Daily Life”) in Japan. Educational activities on writing in Japan are introduced by providing a topic on how Seikatsu Tsuzurikata (“Composition Based on Daily Life”) was started in Japan and its characteristics. While focusing on the relation between “self” and “others” during the linguistic activity of writing, the contemporary significance will be discussed by leaning similar practical cases from the participants.

Discussants:

  • JÖRG F. MAAS, Stiftung Lesen – German Reading Foundation (GERMANY) 
  • NATASHA ARMSTRONG, Booktrust (UNITED KINGDOM)
  • MARC LAMBERT, Scottish Book Trust (SCOTLAND)
  • GERLIEN VAN DALEN, EURead and CEO of Stichting Lezen (NETHERLANDS) 

Symposium Chair: SIMONE EHMIG, Head of the Institute for Research on Reading and Media, German Reading Foundation (GERMANY)

Presentation: MARIJN BROUCKAERT, Dutch-speaking public library of the City of Brussels (BELGIUM)

Language: English

Location: Aula Magna (first floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)


EURead is a European network to promote reading and literacy across Europe. The goal of the symposium is to bring together experts of EURead to discuss examples of best practice in the field of literacy and reading promotion such as Bookstart in different European countries. Every person who is interested in the promotion of reading and writing in and out of educational institutions is welcomed to join the discussion with the experts of EURead. In Europe, more than 73 million people are illiterate – an alarmingly large number. One in five 15- year-olds has poor reading skills and 12,8 % of EU students drop out of school, which will lead to a 30 % increase in low-skilled jobs by 2020 (source: EU High Level Group of Experts on Literacy, Final Report September 2012). In order to address this educational, social and economic challenge, it is vital to promote literacy in Europe and engage all age groups with reading. Therefore, EURead aims to improve reading and writing in Europe – for every member of society, regardless of their financial, cultural, or social backgrounds. Literacy is a prerequisite for education, personal development, participation in society and economic growth: the ability to read significantly influences income as identified by the OECD’s report ‘Education at a Glance’ 2014. Shared reading and reading for pleasure are positively linked to emergent literacy, wider educational outcomes and health and wellbeing. EURead member organisations currently reach more than 15 million children in about 75.000 schools and other settings with their programmes. With every new member the number of children reached by EURead grows. In order to get people in Europe enthusiastic about reading, EURead unites all their members’ expert knowledge to help create a Europe-wide community of engaged readers. EURead fosters the sharing of knowledge and learning with organisations in- and outside of Europe, develops new strategies to support reading promotion and raises awareness about reading and literacy in Europe. EURead enables the sharing of best practice around designing and implementing programmes across Europe and raises awareness of campaigns at European level. One example of the successful sharing of expertise and best practice through EURead is the wider adoption of book-gifting schemes such as Bookstart across Europe. Pioneered by the UK reading charity Booktrust, Bookstart started out as a small pilot in Birmingham over 20 years ago. Today the programme reaches over 1 million children and their families every year, and has inspired nearly 30 similar book-gifting programmes around the world with the simple idea that an early introduction to stories, books and rhymes will offer every child the best possible start in life. Bookstart highlighted and embedded the importance of sharing books with babies and children, and became an international flagship as the first large-scale book-gifting programme across the world. Thanks to the work of EURead, Bookstart programmes and practice are widespread in Europe, including Lesestart in Germany and the Art of Reading in the Netherlands. EURead currently consist of fourteen non-profit-organisations working under the umbrella of the national authorities, involving all parts of society including political decision makers, associations, labour organisations, churches, schools, kindergartens, celebrities and companies. EURead is a registered non-profit-organisation according to Belgian law.

Discussants:

  • ANDREA TORRES-PERDIGÓN, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana (COLOMBIA)
  • YASMIN GALVIS ARDILA, Universidad EAN (COLOMBIA)
  • BIBIAN PAOLA FERNÁNDEZ LUNA, Universidad EAN (COLOMBIA)

Roundtable Chair: ANDREA TORRES-PERDIGÓN

Presentation: PLÁCIDO BAZO MARTÍNEZ, University of La Laguna (SPAIN)

Language: English

Location: Aula 2534 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)


The teaching of academic reading and writing processes at the university matches some common assumptions, which agree with a number of epistemological suppositions and paradigms (Kuhn, 2012), and with a series of processes that match certain ideologies or idea systems (Volochinov, 1929 & Bakhtin, 1975). This happens because these abilities are meant to be used across the curriculum and imply some degree of specialization within a particular field of knowledge (Rusell, 2013). For this reason, both the teaching and learning of reading and writing at the university are always part of specific discourses, fields and disciplines, which arrange these practices. This panel presentation intends to approach both the ideologies and paradigms that are present in literacy processes from the perspectives of both professors and students, so that they are explicit and open for discussion. In essence, the panel will feature a presentation of some theoretical reflections together with some findings from research projects on academic literacy conducted at Universidad EAN in Bogotá, Colombia. The purpose is to establish a dialogue among various perspectives that influence the conceptions about academic literacy at the university, and how they are closely related to specific idea systems and paradigms. First, the panel will explore the relationship that professors and students create around the academic activities, including the ideas systems that they both possess. In this relationship, the professors’ discourse takes precedence as authority, which calls for the students to learn how to debate, question or dispute in order to create their own idea systems. Secondly, there will be some analyses on the link between the emergence of idea systems and the development of argumentation of first semester students. In third place, the panel will reflect upon the interaction of university mother language instructors and faculty from other fields of knowledge based on some epistemological assumptions that emerge through their interdisciplinary work. Finally, the panel will analyze the experiences of a writing center and its relationship with students’ motivation towards academic literacy.

Discussants: 
  • SILVIA EVA AGOSTO RIERA
  • TEODORO ÁLVAREZ ANGULO
  • PEDRO HILARIO SILVA
  • TERESA MATEO GIRONA
  • ENRIQUE ORTÍZ AGUIRRE

Grupo de Investigación Didactex (Didáctica de la Escritura), Universidad Complutense de Madrid (ESPAÑA)

Roundtable Chair: SILVIA EVA AGOSTO RIERA
Presentation: TAMARA ALÍA PRIETO, Spanish Reading and Writing Association
Language: Spanish
Location: Aula 2533 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)

La escritura de textos académicos es una competencia que requiere ejercitación, mediación y ayuda sistemáticas y por ello resulta fundamental desarrollar propuestas didácticas fundamentadas en modelos o teorías de producción textual  que favorezcan el estudio de los géneros discursivos y las estrategias de producción textual. Con el fin de responder a esta necesidad, el Grupo Didactext desarrolló la plataforma, RedacText 2.0, que propone un proceso de enseñanza y aprendizaje de la escritura de textos académicos a partir del modelo de producción textual elaborado por el Grupo (Didactext, 2003 y 2015). Esta plataforma, que ofrece andamiaje suficiente para que los estudiantes puedan llevar a cabo las tareas de escritura de manera autónoma y autorregulada, entiende la escritura como un proceso en el que se reconocen las siguientes etapas: acceso al conocimiento, planificación, producción, revisión y reescritura, edición y defensa oral. Para cada etapa, la plataforma ofrece un tutorial y una serie de actividades para alcanzar, al finalizar su recorrido, la producción de un texto coherente, cohesivo y adecuado.

Discussants:

  • SYLVIA KAMOWITZ-HAREVEN, Pajama Library (ISRAEL)
  • SIMA HADAD, Israeli Ministry of Education (ISRAEL)
  • GALINA VROMEN, Harold Grinspoon Foundation (ISRAEL)
  • MONA SROUJI, Lantern Library (ISRAEL)

Roundtable Chair: GALINA VROMEN, Director of Sifriyat Pijama and Maktabat al-Fanoos book programs and Executive Director of Grinspoon Foundation (ISRAEL)

Presentation: TAMARA MORATO MORATILLO, University Complutense of Madrid

Language: English

Location: Aula 1525 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)


Research has shown that exposure to books from an early age and shared parent-child reading in the home can have transformative effects on children’s attitudes toward reading, verbal expression, knowledge of the world, and socio-emotional development. Furthermore, children’s literature can serve as a springboard for discussion of personal values and family belief systems, an expression of common cultural heritage and a unifying force in ethnically diverse societies. Acting on this knowledge base, the Israeli Ministry of Education, together with a US-based non-profit Harold Grinspoon Foundation (HGF) and other supporters, developed two innovative book programs: Sifriyat Pijama (Pajama Library) in Hebrew, and Maktabat al-Fanoos (Lantern Library) in Arabic. PAJAMA LIBRARY and LANTERN LIBRARY are national Israeli reading-readiness programs that provide high-quality picture books to young children aged 3-6, reaching 90% of children in the public education system (in a country where education is compulsory and free from the age of 3). The programs aim to foster a love of books and encourage shared conversational reading in the home. Each program distributes eight children’s books annually to preschoolers and their families, ultimately providing each child with a personal home library of 24 picture books. For many these are the only children’s books in the home. Using a combined school- and home-based model, the programs serve children from diverse backgrounds: Jewish, Christian, Moslem and Druze; religious and secular; immigrant and Israeli-born; disadvantaged and wealthy. To date the programs have distributed a total of 12 million books. But in Israel’s highly-diverse society, where Jews and Arabs receive their education in separate school systems and in separate languages, and where within the Jewish population, observant and secular Jewish children generally attend different schools, these book programs serve also as a unifying influence while addressing the uniqueness of Arab and Jewish culture/heritage. In both the Hebrew and Arabic program, throughout the school year, eight different age-appropriate children’s books are distributed monthly to preschools around the country, in parcels containing multiple copies of that month’s selection. Each book includes activity and conversation guides for parents and teachers. Upon receiving the parcel, the teachers read aloud the book in the classroom and carry out activities and discussions relating to the story. Then each child receives his or her personal copy of the book to take home as a gift for the family library. The books serve as a bridge between the home and the classroom, as teachers work together with families to empower parents and reinforce the social values reflected in the stories. We propose a symposium in which speakers will describe our model and the experience gained through our work with teachers, children and parents – experience that demonstrates how an early childhood literacy program may not only promote the children’s capabilities on the eve of their entrance to primary school, but also impact family reading habits, empower disadvantaged families, and promote a common literary and cultural canon among different strata of society. We will give an overview of the guiding principles of our model, present data from nation-wide quantitative studies of the two programs, describe our modus operandi and provide examples of some of the cultural-bound and linguistic challenges faced in literacy programs that serve a diverse, multi-cultural and multi-lingual population and seek to level the playing field in preparing children for school.

C Parallel sessions (Wednesday, 5 July – from 12.00 a.m. to 1.15 p.m.): ORAL PRESENTATIONS

Location: Aula 3201 (third floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)

Presentation: AELE Team

Language: English (one of the papers: English/ Spanish)


Project Leo leo: motivating for reading through Spanish as a foreign language 

Petra Mikeln, Osnovna šola Polje (SLOVENIA)

Language: English

Project Leo leo, first Spanish reading badge for young readers, has been present in Slovenia for five years. Started by a small editorial house Malinc, specialised in bringing authors from the Spanish-speaking world (especially authors of children’s and youth literature) into Slovenia, it aims at motivating young readers (pre-school to about 12-year-olds, but also older) to read more, to delve deeper into literary works and above all to discover the joy of reading. The project is based on the work of Montserrat Sarto (1919–2009), a Spanish librarian, reading mentor and expert on youth literature, who – with a group of co-workers – developed strategies for motivating young people to read. Her strategies are based on the principles of constructivism and on the importance of experiential learning and of games in a child’s life. Within the project Leo leo another dimension has been added – the use of foreign language, namely Spanish. In my presentation I will describe how the project was carried out with 9- to 12-year-old students at Primary School Polje in Ljubljana, where I teach English and Spanish. I will briefly present the literary works we read and then focus on the various strategies we used in motivating students to read as well as on the works students created as a result of their reading experience (drawings, alternative texts…). By exposing students to quality youth literature, both in Spanish and in the Slovenian translation, we managed to raise their language as well as intercultural awareness while all the time encouraging their enjoying in reading and supporting autonomous interpretation and self-expression.


Using English Language Learners’ Gestures as Clues to Help Them Develop English Vocabulary        

Xiao-lei Wang, Raquel Plotka and Philippe Eberhard, Pace University, School of Education (USA)

Language: English

Vocabulary is fundamental for children’s narrative, literacy, and academic development. Past research has suggested that spontaneous hand gestures produced in speech can convey substantial information about children’s thoughts and their language development. Research has also indicated that adults scaffold children to learn new information by using their spontaneous gestures as clues. This study examines whether adults can use the spontaneous hand gestures produced by English language learning children in narration as clues to help them acquire English vocabulary faster. Forty 5-year-old English-language learners with Chinese first-language background participated in the study. Twenty children were randomly assigned to the control group and 20 to the experimental group. The participants’ genders were balanced with half females and half males. The children’s narration of a wordless book was video-recorded. The results suggest that when the adult used the children’s spontaneous gestures as clues to teach corresponding English words, 94% (92% males and 88% females) of the children in the experimental group were able to learn the words faster than those in the control group were (words were taught generically without using children’s gestures as clues). In particular, iconic and metaphoric gestures were the best type of gestures to be used as index for new vocabulary teaching. Educational implications in early childhood settings are discussed.


The Troubles Faced with Syrian Students in Turkish Language Teaching

Birsen Dogan and Vesile Alkan, Pamukkale University (TURKEY)

Language: English

Problems like wars, lack of safety and etc. Syrian people had to leave their countries. As a result of this, since 2011, Syrian people immigrated to Turkey and started to live in terms of Turkish life styles. In order to meet their basic life necessities, they need to know Turkish as a second language. Therefore, the Ministry of National Education of Turkey (MoNE) recruited about 5 thousand teachers for Syrian students. This study aimed to investigate the troubles that these teachers deal with during teaching Turkish language. Therefore, a qualitative research design is selected to find out these troubles. To do this, a form with open-ended questions including questions like ‘What are you thinking about different cultures?, What is your opinion about Syrian students?, Do you think that you could teach Turkish to Syrian students as wished?, How do you think that you would do this?, What are the specific troubles you deal with these students?, What could be the main reason for each troubles?, Do you think that you were trained enough for these students? What do you suggest for this type of training courses? etc” is used. The result of this study might be helpful for the training courses arranged by MoNE by considering teachers’ views.


Aprendizaje de la cultura española y latina: una creciente necesidad de maestros en los Estados Unidos 

Francine Falk-Ross and Rosario Adler, Pace University (USA)

Language: Spanish/ English

Understanding the languages and meeting the needs of an increasingly diverse population in the United States requires significant change in universities’ programs (Ladson-Billings, 1999) in order to prepare them for content-specific business careers (e.g., banking, business management, medical practice). Such changes cannot be successfully be instituted if college students are not afforded opportunities to examine and improve their attitudes and beliefs related to language differences (Melnick & Zeichner, 1995) and to learn the basics of a second language, most importantly, Spanish. Frye and Gonzales (2008) have shown that in recent years in the United States, one in five students are of Hispanic origin, and that the numbers are growing fast. They (through their Pew Center research) have predicted that the numbers of Hispanic students who are career-ready will outnumber those who do not speak Spanish. Woolfolk (2010) notes that, “Being bilingual and bicultural means mastering the knowledge necessary to communicate in two cultures as well as dealing with potential discrimination” (2010, p. 176). Instructive feedback is gained from evaluative information that students receive as they learn a second (and possibly third) language, specifically Spanish. This presentation will provide the results of research synthesis and a qualitative survey of students in business-preparation disciplinary university study as they consider the benefits and challenges of learning Spanish and the Spanish culture to be able to meet the needs of their clients in the near future. Implications for future programs consider more global connections and intercultural projects need to be infused into university programs for future career preparation.

Location: Aula 3202 (third floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)

Presentation: AELE Team

Language: English


Refugees in International Education Journals: A Content Analysis

Ellen Clark, George Mason University (USA)

Language: English

The purpose of this content analysis is to determine what topics related to refugees are being addressed by researchers in peer-reviewed international education journals published in the last five years and to examine how refugee literacy is addressed. I desired to learn what theoretical perspectives and methodologies are used to study refugee issues in international education and to determine which journals address these issues. This process was informed by Altheide’s (1987) work in ethnographic content analysis, allowing for a reflexive approach to data collection and analysis. Only 25 of 178 articles reviewed featured studies that address refugee issues. More than half were published in the past two years. The results of this analysis were viewed through the lens of theories of cultural capital and wealth (Yosso, 2005). This theory recognizes Communities of Color bring numerous forms of cultural capital to school systems. The number of studies that resulted with refugee student participants could indicate researchers who study refugee education issues value the perspectives of refugees and believe their input useful in improving school systems. Only two articles addressed refugee literacy. This is problematic as non-governmental organizations and school systems work to improve refugee literacy worldwide. Eight studies introduce a deficit perspective, whether interrupted schooling or low test scores. While these academic struggles merit discussion, if refugees are introduced in research articles without mention of cultural capital or other knowledge and skills, the impression left is characterized by deficit. This is especially an issue in studies addressing literacy, as it implies that refugee students do not bring prior knowledge with them to the classroom and leans towards a banking method of teaching. (Freire, 1985). If researchers challenge the deficit discourse used in discussion of refugees, perhaps refugee students could learn in schools without negative labels attached to them.


See you, Book Buddy           

Mia Graae, University College Metropol (DENMARK) and Elsebeth Otzen, University College Metropol (DENMARK)

Language: English

”See you, Book Buddy” is a study inspired by an American research-based one-to-one tutorial program (Book Buddies) that supports struggling readers in primary school. As in the USA the main goal of the study is to improve reading abilities and reading motivation among children who are at risk of reading failure. “See you, Book Buddy” focuses not only on the struggling readers but includes the whole class. In this intervention a more experienced reader from the 8th grade is tutoring a younger child from 3rd or 5th grade two to three times a week for 14 weeks. Each session lasts 45 minutes and consists of four components: Reading familiar text (1), reading new text using a specific reading strategy (2), word study (3), and reading comprehension strategies (4). The pupils read at different levels and they choose various books suiting their reading skills and interests. The training activities are the same, but as they read different books the level of the activities differs – both in the word study and in the reading comprehension tasks. The 8th graders are guided to be tutors before and during the sessions. They are introduced to our training program and instructional materials and they practice how to provide emotional and instructional support. The intervention was pilot tested in the spring of 2016 with positive results. The pupils were motivated by this way of reading and the cross-age tutoring had positive effect on the social behavior at the school. The final study will take place in autumn 2016 including 42 classes and a similar amount in autumn 2017. The first results of our study will be published in 2017. This study is a collaboration between the Danish Ministry of Education and Metropolitan University College, and the intervention is evaluated by Rambøll and Trygfonden Children`s Research.


Children´s and young people´s literature

Sabina Burkeljca, School librarian and Slovene language. Primary School Rodica (SLOVENIA)

Language: English

Throughout my professional years as a librarian and a teacher of the Slovenian language, I have always felt addressed by literature for the youth aged from 12 to 15 years as well as different forms of work with the student population of this age. It is the age in which the motivation to read starts to drop since the youth divert their attention more and more into socializing with their peers. Therefore, a lot of them push reading aside in this period. As a librarian, I have noticed that the motivation to read is closely linked to what we offer to the youth with the texts, in order for them to see the texts as something that can speak back to them in their lives. I will present a literature model of BIBLIOPREVENTION in which we, as a group, read a quality youth work of art. Throughout doing so, we stop with certain parts of the text, talk on a deeper level about the characters and events but most of all, I try to emphasise the fact that we speak about our own experience of the text and in doing so about our own experience of life. It is also a period in which problems of adolescents start opening up, either in school or at home. A mentor/teacher has a supportive role in the group, a role of directing, being a connoisseur of literature and at the same time being able and willing to experience the youths in an EMPHATIC manner and lead them to understand that literature can shelter, aid and support them, that it broadens their horizons and makes their lives free of taboos. In this way, books become their pillows, which comfort them, accompany them and offer escape or facing the problem when necessary. Teenagers like to reach for realistic stories (as opposed to imaginary ones) since they can see their own problems in them like for example family conflicts, first loves, family problems, sexuality related problems , etc. The book therefore speaks back to them and comforts them. I will present the model of reading club in which the elements of bibliotherapy/biblioprevention are incorporated. Another part of my presentation will be dedicated to the positive results of reading quality youth literature in a group with a mentor, who accompanies them with compassion. Teenagers begin to see reading as a social event whereas the book is no longer a myth in the sense of literary theory explanation within literature classes.


Mediated reading of wordless picture books: Developing visual literacy

Marília Forgearini Nunes and Analice Dutra Pillar, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (BRAZIL)

Language: English

When it comes to teaching reading, the practices proposed by schools often are more related to verbal texts. One main reason can justify this, developing a verbal reader is not an easy process and it depends on a variety of actions in order to expose the learner to different situations until the alphabetical system is totally comprehended in reading and writing. Reading images, in this context, becomes a secondary practice. However, imagetic texts are part of our everyday life by itself or associated with verbal texts and these images, they cannot be considered only as ornaments in any case. They have their own way of expression leading us to content. The way towards the discursive meaning of these images is built inside the text, in its internal structure, and outside, in the interaction between the reader who looks to the text and the text itself. Discursive semiotics, from the French basis, is a theory that helps us to understand meaning constitution in the act of reading. Based on this theory we present an analysis of a wordless picture book, aiming to show how this imagetic text is built, pointing out meaning effects that can result from its internal relations. Besides that, we discuss how the interaction reader-text, the external relation, can take place based on the way the reader is acting and being in relation to the text or to other subjects during the reading. All this is presented aiming to defend the idea that improving visual literacy is not only related to the individual ability of see, but it is also related to how the text is read and how this ability is fostered. Thus, visual literacy, using wordless picture books, depends on a mediated reading practice that considers the text and the interaction with the readers.


Exploring Multilingual, Refugee Adolescents’ Tranglanguaging in an After-School Informal Writing Program          

Louise Wilkinson and Stella Rwanda, Syracuse University (USA)

Language: English

This qualitative case study of refugee adolescents’ writing in an after-school program was framed by the concept of translanguaging: Multi-linguals are encouraged and supported to utilize all of their linguistic and cultural resources as tools to support their writing. The focus was on how multilingual adolescents mobilized their linguistic and cultural resources to collaborate with each other in their production of authentic, multilingual, expository and narrative texts. The eight participants emigrated from Africa and/or were the children of African immigrants. Their first language was one of the following: Kibembe, Kinyarwanda, Kinyamurenge, Luganda, Kinyankore, Swahili, Somali, or French. The data were collected in an after-school academic program sponsored by a community association for African refugees. The data set included essays, journals, responses to a language usage questionnaire and interviews, parental interviews, and researchers’ field notes. Examination included a thematic analysis of the participants’ identity as writers and attitudes towards writing; and an inventory of academic language features (lexical, grammatical, discourse). The findings revealed participants: (1) Expressed their identities as successful writers; (2) engaged in translanguaging; and (3) buttressed their production and communication of texts. The results illuminate the role of translanguaging for multilingual adolescents’ text production. The work contributes to theories at the intersection of multilingual language/literacy learning and identity. The educational implications of engaging students in hybrid learning spaces such as translanguaging are considered; specifically, those that function as safe-spaces, where adolescents, especially those at-risk for educational failure, can deploy all of their cultural and linguistic resources to literacy tasks.

Location: Aula 3301 (third floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)

Presentation: JEROEN CLEMENS, Reading Association in the Netherlands (NETHERLANDS)

Language: English


The development and Implementation of Weblog-based writing program for the elementary school students

Chi-Jen Huang, National Chia-Yi University (TAIWAN)

Language: English

The purpose of this study is to inquire into the development and implementation of an innovative weblog-based writing program based on the recent findings of writing research and trends of information society. We adopted the framework of learning community, and a co-operative action research inquiry to conduct the study. Writing curriculum was developed based on either the philosophy of whole language, or the principles of guided writing with the media of weblog. There were six meetings held to introduce the theory, share, and review the examples of participant teachers’ implementation in their classrooms. Multiple methods were used to collect data, such as focus group interviews, personal interviews, classroom observations, and writing samples from elementary case classrooms. Finally, suggestions and recommendations for the innovations of the writing curriculum at elementary school are provided.


Children’s digital and non-digital play activities in their homes

Laura Teichert, University of British Columbia (CANADA)

Language: English

The purpose of this paper is to describe the digital and non-digital play activities of three young children in their homes. Data are drawn from a larger study describing how children use digital tools, such as mobile phones, tablets, or electronic toys and/or video games, and their engagement in digital literacy practices in the context of family life before, and as they transition into, kindergarten. This larger study, which employed ethnographic methods including semi-structured interviews, observation, and artifact collection, took place over one year. Findings from this study found that all children’s home contained many digital tools and all had varying levels of access to those tools. Although children were interested in digital media, it was not necessarily their first choice in determining a play activity. Parents were aware the focus of my study was on children’s digital tool engagement, but many visits consisted of children playing board games or reading aloud. Additionally, when these children did engage with digital media and digital tools, they moved fluidly between digital and non-digital environments, particularly in narrative play. For example, watching a video on an iPad and transitioning to a chalk board to create alternate story lines for the video’s characters. Children do not see a tension between print and digital tools, but fluidly engage with a variety of tools (print and digital) to understand their worlds. Digital texts can be considered mirrors or extensions of non-digital texts, thus complimenting them and not competing with them. Appreciating the fluidity with which children move from non-digital to digital play spaces will allow educators to support children’s meaning-making opportunities by providing activities that mimic home-based play activities.


Using digital media when access is limited: A 5 years old’s story

Laura Teichert, University of British Columbia (CANADA)

Language: English

In this paper, I describe the ways a 5-year-old male engaged with technology and digital tools, despite strict limitations placed on his access by his parents. Data are drawn from a larger study describing how children use digital tools, such as mobile phones, tablets, or electronic toys and/or video games, and their engagement in digital literacy practices in the context of family life before, and as they transition into, kindergarten. Data sources included semi- structured interviews, observations, informal, ‘in the moment’ conversations and artifact collection, which was collected over one year. Findings from this study found that this child’s home contained many digital devices and that he had a strong interest in digital media but was not allowed unfettered access by his parents. Rather, he was restricted to 10 minutes of ‘video game time’ once a week with his father (increased to 10 minutes every two days after he entered kindergarten) and a weekly ‘movie night’ with this family. However, despite his limited access to technology and digital media, this boy found ways to circumvent his parents’ restrictions by 1) being a participant in this study; and 2) by ‘sneaking’ digital time when his mother was occupied with other tasks. As well, echoing examples of print-based, digital play described by Wohlwend (2009), this child created paper-based video games to “play” during the summer when his mother removed digital play from his play options. Although he had many digital devices in his home he did not engage in large amounts of digital play. Yet, despite his lack of access, he found spaces in his world to engage with technology this technological engagement influenced his non-digital play.


Digital technology and children’s attitudes towards reading

Gulsah Ozturk, Istanbul Kultur University (TURKEY)

Language: English

This paper reports on the preliminary findings from a research, which investigated 6-7 years old children’s attitudes towards reading in relation to children’s multimodal literacy practices and parental views about the use of technology. Children of today encounter many different types of texts through their engagement with digital technologies. It was assumed that young children’s multimodal literacy practices in their homes would support their reading attitudes. A total of 107 children from two primary schools from Istanbul and their parents participated in this study. Parents completed a questionnaire about their views on the use of technology, their children’s multimodal literacy experiences, and perceptions of their children’s reading attitudes. The results indicated that parents’ perceptions of their children’ reading attitudes were significantly and positively related to parent-child multimodal literacy practices. It was also found that parents’ anti-technology views were significantly and negatively related to their perceived child reading attitudes. The results suggest that parents can support children’s enjoyment in reading through engaging in both digital and non-digital print experiences with their children.

Location: Aula 3401 (third floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)

Presentation: LUCIENE DA COSTA SILVA, Centro de Educación Infantil y Primaria “Victoria Kent”, Rivas Vaciamadrid (SPAIN)

Language: Spanish / Portuguese (it is indicated in each case)


Aprendendo a ensinar a leitura e a escrita: análise de percursos formativos de futuros(as) pedagogos(as)

Marilza de Oliveira Santos and Cláudia Starling, Universidade do Estado de Minas Gerais (BRAZIL)

Language: Portuguese

O trabalho propõe a análise de práticas de estágio curricular supervisionado envolvendo o ensino da leitura e da escrita, desenvolvidas por estudantes do Curso de Pedagogia, matriculados(as) em duas diferentes universidades públicas no Brasil. Discute a inserção de futuros(as) professores(as) na docência, analisando as experiências formativas vivenciadas durante o período de estágio curricular. Dialoga com estudos sobre a formação inicial (Garcia, 1999; Nóvoa, 1992, Imbernón, 1992, Gatti, Pimenta, 2006) e com referenciais sobre o ensino da leitura e da escrita (Soares, 1988; Schneuwly e Dolz, 2004; Kleiman, 2004; Geraldi, 2006). Sustenta-se em pressupostos relacionados à pesquisa qualitativa, utilizando como principal fonte de dados a escrita de autobiográficas pelos(as) estudantes sobre suas vivências, especificamente enfatizando o ensino da leitura e da escrita. Utilizou-se também como fonte de dados, relatórios de estágio elaborados pelos/as estudantes. Para análise dos dados, foi utilizada a análise de conteúdos (Bardin, 1977), tendo como objetivo compreender os sentidos das escritas dos sujeitos investigados. Os resultados apontam diversos conflitos vivenciados pelos/as estudantes na observação do espaço escolar, planejamento e realização das aulas propostas envolvendo a leitura e a escrita. Indica algumas reflexões sobre a necessidade de uma postura investigativa e reflexiva dos/as discentes e docentes sobre as situações vivenciadas pelos futuros/as professores/as, que sinalizam suas expectativas e percepções sobre determinados modos de pensar os processos de ensino e aprendizagem da leitura e da escrita para crianças. Isso reforça a importância de discutir a formação de professores/as de maneira mais colaborativa na formação inicial.


Diseño Instruccional y alfabetización inicial. Trabajo multidisciplinario e interinstitucional en tres universidades públicas mexicanas      

Abraham Ronquillo Bolaños, Elsa María Fueyo Hernández and Karla Villaseñor Palma, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla (MEXICO)

Language: Spanish

Ante la rápida evolución de la tecnología educativa, los Cursos Abiertos Masivos en Línea (MOOC por sus siglas en inglés) son una tendencia que abre nuevas perspectivas a las plataformas digitales educativas; la presentación de información en un sistema masivo multimodal requiere de procesos sistemáticos de Diseño Instruccional (DI) destinados a mejorar los procesos de instrucción y facilitar el aprendizaje de los estudiantes. Los modelos de DI permiten traducir los principios generales de la enseñanza para proporcionar un marco de procedimientos para el desarrollo de materiales instruccionales y crean un ambiente propicio para el aprendizaje significativo.Este trabajo de investigación pretende proyectar un marco teórico que posibilite el desarrollo de contenidos a implementarse en un MOOC orientado a la alfabetización inicial, realizado por un equipo multidisciplinario de tres universidades públicas mexicanas, que tiene como objetivo la formación de docentes y acompañantes pedagógicos que atiendan los retos de alfabetización inicial y de articulación entre preescolar y primaria. En un MOOC, el DI involucra los procesos necesarios en el desarrollo de un programa educativo a distancia, además implica aspectos que otorgan un sentido más complejo, pues posibilita el desarrollo de estrategias didácticas (Gallegos, Mejía y Zermeño, 2015). Para el proceso de desarrollo de contenidos de un MOOC es imprescindible el correcto uso del DI y la tecnología que se utilizará en su elaboración, por lo que se hace necesaria la elaboración de un modelo de desarrollo sistemático que incluya análisis, diseño, implementación y evaluación, fundamentado en las actividades planteadas por Kahlil y Elkhinder (2016) propias del diseñador instruccional. Como lo mencionan Sezer, Karaoglan, y Yilmaz (2013), los diseñadores instruccionales desarrollan procedimientos sistemáticos de diseño que permiten hacer un proceso de enseñanza-aprendizaje significativo y pertinente.


Lo que saben sobre alfabetización inicial madres y padres determina lo que aceptan o exigen de la escuela

Martha Ivonn Tenorio Villanueva, Glenda Delgado Gastélum and Karen Hernández Enciso, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla (MEXICO)

Language: Spanish

La alfabetización inicial es un reto escolar curricularmente establecido para los primeros grados de la educación primaria. Madres y padres de familia de niños que acuden a escuelas preescolares o que ingresan a primer grado esperan que el aprendizaje infantil “ocurra”, pero desconocen cómo ocurren los procesos de adquisición y construcción de la lectura y escritura y confían excesivamente en las tradiciones escolares que priorizan la repetición y las planas. Este estudio cualitativo ofrece y analiza información sobre demandas y expectativas en torno a la alfabetización inicial de los padres de familia de una pequeña institución educativa de financiamiento privado, el colegio Darlington. Los resultados de presentación de entrevistas realizadas se divide en tres partes: como primer apartado se revisará el concepto de alfabetización inicial de los padres de familia. Enseguida se abordarán las expectativas de apendizaje formal de la alfabetización inicial que tienen los padres. Por último se analizarán las ventajas de construir entornos y actividades letrados que contribuyan a alfabetizar a los niños dentro y fuera de la escuela. Interesa particularmente hacer una diferenciación entre lo que opinan y solicitan en materia de aprendizaje inicial de la lengua escrita, madres y padres de familia de estudiantes de preescolar (3-6 años) y diferenciarlo de lo que opinan los familiares de estudiantes de primer grado (6 a 7 años).


Aprendizaje de lectura expresiva de cuentos por los estudiantes universitarios de Educación Primaria: propuesta de una experiencia metodológica innovadora

Beatriz Hoster Cabo and Inmaculada Mena-Bernal Rosales, Centro de Estudios Universitarios Cardenal Spínola (SPAIN)

Language: Spanish

Se describe una experiencia didáctica en la etapa universitaria para la formación de maestros de Educación Primaria, dentro de la asignatura de “Literatura española”. En esta asignatura se implementa una nueva estrategia para aumentar tanto el grado de motivación del alumnado en su capacitación lectora, como favorecer la toma de conciencia sobre la importancia de empatizar con las emociones infantiles en su labor de mediadores entre la literatura y los niños en sus primeras edades. La tradicional actividad sobre lectura expresiva de cuentos populares se sustituye por un proyecto que consiste en la elección de un cuento, preparación de la lectura expresiva y posterior grabación en estudio radiofónico con el apoyo del servicio de producción digital del centro. El proyecto finaliza con la creación, por parte de los estudiantes, de un guion para la realización de un espacio radiofónico real sobre literatura infantil y valores, en el que niños y niñas de un colegio conversarán en asamblea tras la audición del cuento. Los resultados obtenidos gracias a este nuevo enfoque metodológico han sido principalmente tres. En primer lugar, un aumento visible, desde el primer momento, de la implicación emocional de los estudiantes que han participado en el proyecto, ilusionados por saber que sus esfuerzos por preparar la lectura de un texto no quedan estancados en el espacio artificial de un laboratorio académico. En segundo lugar, han reconocido haber sentido auténtico placer durante la lectura del cuento, por el hecho de tener presentes a los niños y niñas a quienes va dirigido. Por último, se ha comprobado que mediante este nuevo enfoque los estudiantes han aumentado su conocimiento metacognitivo sobre la interiorización de emociones por parte del lector literario y la importancia de autoanalizar estas y explorar los modos de recrearlas mediante la lectura en voz alta para terceros.


¿Nos dejaron las palabras?: el papel de los productos culturales en la formación de las representaciones sobre el 12 de octubre

María Laura Nuñez, ILE-UNT-CONICET (ARGENTINA)

Language: Spanish

Las discusiones sobre los significados del 12 de octubre en América Latina ha sido particularmente fecunda desde hace décadas. En nuestro país tal debate ha cristalizado en la modificación de su denominación: de llamarse “Día de la Raza” desde su instauración como efeméride en 1917 por el gobierno de Yrigoyen, pasó a llamarse “Día del respeto a la Diversidad Cultural” a partir un Decreto/Ley del gobierno de Cristina Fernández de Kirchner en 2010. No se trata de un mero cambio en la nominalización sino de una transformación profunda en las representaciones sociales y discursivas (Vasilachis de Gialdino, 2003) sobre la fecha y sobre los hechos históricos que buscaron recordarse en la creación de la “fecha patria” a partir de la misma. Mi investigación se concentra en indagar tales representaciones. El corpus se conforma de entrevistas cualitativas a docentes del Nivel Medio. Tal decisión parte de la premisa de que son los educadores los principales sujetos a quienes socialmente se les asigna la tarea de formar futuros ciudadanos y son los encargados de cumplir con los protocolos escolares para concretizar las efemérides. En las entrevistas realizadas, pude observar que los docentes utilizan la literatura en sus entramados discursivo-argumentativos. El Quijote de la Mancha de Cervantes -1605- y Las venas abiertas de América Latina de Eduardo Galeano -1971- figuran entre los textos emergentes más recurrentes. En consecuencia, me pregunto ¿cuál es el uso que los docentes le dan a estas obras literarias en la trama discursiva y cómo se articulan en la lógica argumentativa?, ¿cuáles son las representaciones sociales y discursivas sobre el 12 de octubre que articulan?, ¿cuál es la incidencia del canon literario en la configuración de las mismas?

Location: Aula 3407 (third floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)

Presentation: AELE Team

Language: Spanish


Muestra del Libro Infantil y Juvenil. Un gran proyecto desde una nueva perspectiva

Arantza Neila Barba, Comunidad de Madrid. Bibliotecas Públicas (SPAIN)

Language: Spanish

La Muestra del Libro Infantil y Juvenil es una iniciativa de Fomento de la Lectura compartida por las bibliotecas de la Red de la Comunidad de Madrid, que lleva aparejado el desarrollo de una red colaborativa de selección de literatura infantil y juvenil. El resultado es, por un lado, la publicación de un catálogo anual con las principales novedades el año anterior, que constituye una herramienta de prescripción lectora de gran utilidad para bibliotecarios y mediadores. Por otro, una exposición bibliográfica con los libros seleccionados que circula durante el año siguiente por los municipios de la región, acompañada de diversas actividades de animación a la lectura. Las posibilidades de cooperación que brinda la MLIJ son enormes, tanto por su valor como actividad de Fomento de la Lectura como por el papel que representa como impulsora del libro infantil en nuestra región. Actualmente la Muestra se encuentra inmersa en un proceso de renovación que, manteniendo el objetivo fundamental del proyecto, tiene en cuenta planes conjuntos y nuevas propuestas interactivas de comunicación con los lectores y con todos los componentes de la cadena del libro.


Lectura dialógica dentro y fuera de las aulas

María Pilar Serrano Martín and María José García-Vao Bel, Proyecto Municipal Actuaciones Educativas de Éxito en Rivas Vaciamadrid (SPAIN)

Language: Spanish

Esta comunicación quiere dar a conocer la experiencia en Lectura Dialógica dentro y fuera de los centros educativos de Rivas Vaciamadrid, utilizando una metodología de orientación comunicativa. La lectura dialógica, una de las Actuaciones Educativas de Éxito identificadas en el proyecto Includ-ed, avalado y financiado por la Unión Europea, llevado a cabo entre los años 2006-2011. A través de sus diferentes prácticas, impulsa la participación y la formación de toda la comunidad ampliando los espacios donde se lee y el tiempo en el que se lee: 1. Tertulias Literarias o Pedagógicas Dialógicas, la comunidad leyendo, debatiendo y disfrutando de los clásicos de la literatura universal o de textos pedagógicos, dando significado al texto a través de sus experiencias, sentimientos, reflexiones y con diálogo igualitario. Alumnado de Educación Infantil, Primaria, Secundaria, Bachillerato, mujeres marroquíes en proceso de alfabetización, profesorado en su formación permanente y con familias, adultos solos o con niños y niñas, en horario escolar y extraescolar. 2. Lectura acompañada: adultos escuchando leer a los niños y niñas y reforzándoles en positivo. 3. Lectura compartida entre alumnado de diferentes edades que se leen cuentos o libros mutuamente. La Lectura Dialógica ofrece resultados como: ampliación de vocabulario, mayor fluidez, desarrollo de la expresión oral y del espíritu crítico, mejora de velocidad y comprensión lectora, aumento de autoestima, motivación hacia la lectura, creación de sentido hacia el aprendizaje, creación de comunidades de lectores. La participación de toda la comunidad en la educación y el incremento de interacciones alrededor de la lectura han generado la creación de espacios de diálogo y reflexión por todo el municipio y han fomentado el acceso a la alfabetización como base de los aprendizajes y de la inclusión de todos y todas en nuestra actual sociedad de la información.


El día de las palabras. una iniciativa disruptiva en el contexto escolar

Mónica María Márquez Hermosillo and Sofía Orozco Torres, Letra uno, A.C. (MEXICO)

Language: Spanish

Letra Uno es una Asociación Civil independiente, cuya misión es colaborar en la construcción de una sociedad más humana, con mayor calidad de vida y más oportunidades para todos, a través de la recuperación del valor de la Palabra. Desde 2014 a la fecha, uno de los proyectos que comenzamos a desarrollar es “El Día de las Palabras”, proyecto social que busca el impulso a la lectura y a la escritura entre la niñez. Consiste en visitar escuelas públicas y realizar una serie de jornadas imaginativas que generen experiencias de acercamiento a la lectura por placer y a la escritura creativa, en un ambiente afectuoso y de celebración. En “El Día de las Palabras” buscamos abrir espacios para experimentar la palabra de manera distinta, visualizar nuevas concepciones de la lectura, de los textos, de las bibliotecas, las tareas y prácticas escolares, de tal manera que cada niña y cada niño encuentre formas creativas de leer y escribir que ayuden a resignificar su experiencia con la lectoescritura y a ampliar su sentido. Nuestra metodología es desde su planteamiento interdisciplinaria, centrada en la persona, y disruptiva a nivel conceptual, discursivo y actitudinal. Al momento hemos visitado 22 escuelas, todas ubicadas en zonas de alta marginación económica y cultural de la Zona Metropolitana de Guadalajara, Jalisco, México. Visitamos cada escuela 6 veces, con una frecuencia semanal, y trabajamos con los chicos durante toda la jornada escolar. En total, nuestro contacto ha sido con más de 7,000 niños entre 6 y 12 años de edad. En Letra Uno, estamos convencidos de que en una sociedad lastimada como la nuestra, las palabras y de la voz creativa de los sujetos tienen propiedades curativas para la reconstrucción de la identidad personal y el tejido social.


Escribir como lectores – Colombia

Claudia Patricia Guerrero Gaviri and Julia Helena Quesada, Colegio Cambridge (COLOMBIA)

Language: Spanish

Literatura, intertextos y evocación: una propuesta de secuencia didáctica con la narrativa de ficción en educación básica, se trata de una Secuencia Didáctica (SD) que parte del hecho que los estudiantes disfrutan con los textos escritos en la medida que se sienten lectores y escritores capaces y que, a su vez, esta capacidad la desarrollan enfrentándose a variadas situaciones en el aula. La SD les propone la experiencia de leer una obra literaria sintiéndose escritores. Permite compartir las experiencias de reescritura de un texto literario a partir de la obra de un autor considerando que la escritura es un interesante camino para despertar la curiosidad por el mundo escrito y, en consecuencia, desarrollar actividades relacionadas con la construcción de una identidad activa dentro de la sociedad. El proyecto propicia la escritura de diversos géneros discursivos a partir de las inquietudes que genera en sus lectores el texto de una obra literaria determinada. Es decir, pretende que los estudiantes se sumerjan en la obra literaria, contando con la cercanía de su autor, para enriquecer la narrativa de la novela a través de los diferentes textos que produzcan. Así, esta propuesta se centra, esencialmente, en generar procesos colaborativos entre la lectura de una obra literaria, el contacto de su autor o autora, la investigación temática y la escritura de diversos géneros textuales. Por parte de los docentes, esta S.D. cuenta con un ejercicio riguroso de planeación, escritura, aplicación y análisis de la experiencia (sistematización) que permite que cada una de las sesiones que la componen (20 en total) cuenten con el abordaje total del trabajo de aula y de posteriores análisis que han proporcionado la continua mejora de este instrumento, en bien del estudiante, del docente y del producto esperado.


Lectura compartida: contémonos un cuento

Julia Helena Quesada Gutierrez and Claudia Patricia Guerrero Gaviria, Colegio Cambridge (COLOMBIA)

Language: Spanish

La lectura Compartida: contémonos un cuento, tiene como propósito vincular a toda la comunidad educativa del colegio Cambridge y a la comunidad aledaña (escuelas rurales circundantes – con alto grado de vulnerabilidad socio-económico, población perteneciente al barrio El Codito de Bogotá) con la práctica de la lectura, en busca de posicionarla y promocionarla como una práctica social. Así, los estudiantes de toda la institución (desde pre-jardín hasta grado once) participan en la puesta en marcha de una secuencia didáctica de lectura compartida encaminada a fortalecer la formación de procesos de pensamiento y de conocimiento a partir de un proceso de aprendizaje activo y creativo a través de las diferentes modalidades de lectura (voz alta, silenciosa, preparada, entre otras). Convirtiéndose en un proyecto institucional que se trabaja en todos los grados. Además se involucra a los padres de familia y personal docente, administrativo y de servicios generales quienes también participan leyendo con y para otros. Esta propuesta de lectura compartida se denomina “contémonos un cuento”. Se evidencia en varias experiencias, tales como el encuentro de los jóvenes de grados superiores con sus compañeros de pre escolar y primaria, la participación de padres de familia quienes preparan una lectura que comparten con sus hijos dentro del colegio y el encuentro entre docentes con el personal de servicios generales y administrativos de la institución. Además, como parte del avance de la propuesta, a partir del año 2015 nos dimos a la tarea de trabajar la experiencia con las escuelas rurales aledañas a la institución, así como en un espacio que otorga la biblioteca pública del pueblo de La Calera, en el cual los estudiantes asisten a leer para niños de los jardines infantiles del pueblo.

Location: Aula 2401 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)

Presentation: AELE Team

Language: Spanish


Lecturas de la visualidad: análisis de macro y micronarrativas audiovisuales   

Analice Dutra Pillar, Tatiana Telch Evalte and Juliano de Campos, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (BRAZIL)

Language: Spanish

Este trabajo presenta un recorte de la investigación Lecturas de la visualidad: análisis de macro y micronarrativas audiovisuales en contextos educativos que busca contribuir para el campo de la lectura de imágenes enfocando la lectura de macro y micronarrativas audiovisuales contemporáneas; y una propuesta metodológica de análisis de dichas producciones que realizarse en espacios de formación de profesores. Focaliza macronarrativas, o sea, producciones audiovisuales que establecen estereotipos visuales que se colocan como universales; y micronarrativas, como aquellas que se oponen a modelos, generan cuestionamientos evidenciando la diversidad visual y hacen reflexionar sobre nuestra visión del mundo. En el análisis de las producciones audiovisuales el foco son los efectos de sentido que las estrategias de montaje crean al instaurar el discurso audiovisual. Los referenciales de la semiótica discursiva (Fechine, Hernandes, Médola, Teixeira), de la cultura visual (Freedman, Hernández, Walker y Chaplin) y de la educación artística (Acaso, Barbosa, Efland) permiten problematizar esas producciones y desarrollar una propuesta de lectura de macro y micronarrativas. Presentaremos, aquí, los resultados de la primera etapa en que se hizo el levantamiento de la literatura sobre el tema; mapeo, selección y análisis de macro y micronarrativas audiovisuales contemporáneas en cuanto a los efectos de sentido que las estrategias de montaje instauran. En la segunda etapa, se constituirá un estudio focal con estudiantes de un curso de formación de profesores para conocer las lecturas que dichas producciones suscitan y cómo las significan. Y en la tercera etapa se hará un análisis de los datos buscando tejer relaciones entre los efectos de sentido que los procedimientos de montaje crean en macro y micronarrativas contemporáneas, y las significaciones que los estudiantes les confieren. Se pretende, de esa forma, propiciar subsidios teóricos y metodológicos para lecturas de audiovisuales de la media y del arte en contextos educativos.


Con el arte a todas partes

Ana Belén Mariño Taboada, Centro de Educación Infantil y Primaria “Xesús Golmar” (SPAIN)

Language: Spanish

El arte engloba una gran cantidad de conceptos y manifestaciones: desde la pintura hasta la escultura, pasando por la fotografía, cine, música, etc. Abierta a multitud de definiciones, está presente en casi cualquier actividad realizada con esmero en la que se intentan expresar ideas utilizando diferentes recursos y materiales. Con diversas propuestas artísticas, la finalidad de este proyecto es introducirse en el lenguaje artístico para después expresarse, mediante el lenguaje escrito, con diversas creaciones literarias: relatos, poemas, haikus, leyendas, etc. Despertando la creatividad y liberando emociones, este proyecto de trabajo sigue unas líneas metodológicas claras: 1.Aprendizaje cooperativo: todas y todos los alumnos se involucran buscando la participación igualitaria, procurando integrar a aquellos compañeros/as con dificultades de aprendizaje y/o de adaptación. 2. Inteligencias múltiples: la competencia lingüística, por tanto la inteligencia lingüística, suele ser la más trabajada. Aquí también ya que el producto final es de carácter narrativo. Por eso, se pretende abordar la temática desde distintos ámbitos para desarrollar otras capacidades y obtener mejores resultados, con puntos de vista diferentes y enriquecedores. Los objetivos principales de este proyecto son: *Descubrir nuevos puntos de vista ante ciertas manifestaciones artísticas. *Definir un concepto de arte, teniendo en cuenta que nos centraremos en la pintura, la escultura y la fotografía. *Expresar por escrito las emociones, sentimientos y sensaciones que les produce algunas obras de arte determinadas. *Crear un producto de carácter literario, siguiendo un modelo y unos pasos previamente explicados, para su desarrollo y presentación. *Acompañar una de esas creaciones escritas de un montaje artístico: foto, cuadro o escultura, realizado por los alumnos.


Hacia la transalfabetización: leer y escribir de otra forma y con otros lenguajes. Un experimento mediático con Coca-Cola y cola de Mercadona

Ángel Encinas (SPAIN)

Language: Spanish

Los obstáculos para introducir las alfabetizaciones múltiples, y entre ellas la alfabetización mediática en una institución ya de por sí conservadora en el sentido más amplio de la expresión, son enormes. Comienzan con un marco legal que no pasa de las generalidades, y terminan en una escasísima formación del profesorado. Es en este contexto en el que se enmarca el proyecto que aquí se presenta. Se trata de un proyecto de alfabetización mediática, con la transalfabetización como horizonte, realizado con grupos de alumnos de ESO en los “márgenes” del sistema: ACG (Adaptación Curricular en Grupo) y PMAR (Programas de Mejora del Aprendizaje y del rendimiento) de varios centros. En el desarrollo de esta comunicación se comentan las FASES DEL PROYECTO, que empieza siempre con unas catas de colas (Coca-Cola y la cola de Mercadona), organizadas por los alumnos con compañeros de otras aulas. Cada cata tiene dos momentos: cata ciega y cata con presencia de envases. Los resultados de estas catas, siempre dispares y en ocasiones muy llamativos, dan pie para que los alumnos se planteen la enorme importancia del marketing y la publicidad en la educación del deseo, y la necesidad de analizar con las herramientas conceptuales necesarias la retórica audiovisual presente en los spots televisivos.


La revisión literaria del mito de Penélope en la literatura a través de las TIC

María Almudena Cantero Sandoval, Universidad Internacional de La Rioja (SPAIN)

Language: Spanish

Incluido en casi todos los programas de la asignatura de Literatura Universal y Lengua castellana y literatura encontramos el estudio de los mitos literarios y sus continuas revisiones literarias. Tradicionalmente, los alumnos memorizan algunos datos generales sobre la historia literaria de los mismos o leen la obra originaria de los mismos quedándose con la perspectiva de un solo autor. En este caso pretendemos ofrecer al alumnado de 2º de Bachillerato de un IES de la Región de Murcia la posibilidad de conocer el mito de la pasividad femenina encarnado en Penélope atendiendo a las diferentes visiones que ofrecen de él cinco autores literarios en tiempos históricos muy espaciados y lugares geográficos muy diferentes. Homero, Joyce, García Lorca, Claribel Alegría   y Nicolas Clauss componen una tradición literaria que los alumnos deben leer, comprender y enjuiciar para completar una visión “propia” del mito. A través de una metodología interactiva, aplicando las TIC (blogs y redes sociales) y desarrollando su creatividad, con esta propuesta didáctica convertimos a los discentes en protagonistas absolutos de un proceso lector con el que reinterpretan datos e historias y se convierten en parte de la tradición literaria al elaborar su propia definición del mito, producto de la relación que realizan de todo lo trabajado.

1.45 p.m. Lunch Break

C Parallel sessions (Wednesday, 5 July – from 3.15 p.m. to 4.15 p.m.): ORAL PRESENTATIONS / POSTERS

Location: Aula 2531 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)

Presentation: THAYS  SOUZA VIEIRA, University Complutense of Madrid

Language: Portuguese


A relação dos nativos digitais e os livros nas séries iniciais: desafios e conquistas

Claudia Rodrigues da Silva Nascimento and João Hilton Sayeg Siqueira, Pontifícia Universidade Católica de São Paulo (BRAZIL)

Language: Portuguese

A leitura como meio essencial e capaz de levar o indivíduo a acessar de maneira satisfatória seus direitos civis, de lhe abrir inúmeras possibilidades de aquisição de conhecimento e com isso alcançar um progresso satisfatório tem, no decorrer do tempo, sido relevada a um plano de subutilização que beira a nulidade. Parte da culpa desse processo de desuso recai sobre as instituições que deveriam primar justamente pelo contrário: as escolas. Formar leitores é o objetivo prioritário da educação básica, conforme elucida os Parâmetros Curriculares Nacionais (PCNs). No contexto escolar, a leitura é uma habilidade capaz de fundamentar qualquer disciplina, sendo assim em cada ano escolar o aluno deveria desenvolver capacidades, competências e estratégias por meio da leitura que o capacitasse a lidar com as novas demandas curriculares. Logicamente as escolas não estão sozinhas, essa culpa também é compartilhada pela ineficiência das políticas públicas implantadas e também por uma classe docente, em grande número, despreparada e descompromissada com esse ideal tão nobre. Em face do momento hoje vivido com tantas inovações no campo da tecnologia, com o surgimento da chamada geração digital, se faz necessário um profundo estudo objetivando investigar a relação dos nativos digitais com livros nos anos iniciais do ensino fundamental, a fim de detectar os desafios existentes e propor soluções que eliminem os entraves que dificultam o aparecimento de um público leitor.


Pesquisas sobre o desenvolvimento profissional docente: O que dizem as professoras alfabetizadoras?

Márcia Helena Nunes Monteiro and Francisca Izabel Pereira Maciel, Universidade do Estado de Minas Gerais (BRAZIL)

Language: Portuguese

“Alfabetização no Brasil: o estado do conhecimento” é um programa de pesquisa compartilhado por várias instituições brasileiras e pesquisadores da área da Alfabetização. Consiste na organização e análise da produção acadêmica sobre alfabetização no Brasil, buscando compreender os fenômenos da alfabetização e do letramento na realidade brasileira. O acervo, cuja construção teve início em 1980, está disponível no Centro de Alfabetização, Leitura e Escrita, da Faculdade de Educação da Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais. Esta pesquisa de doutoramento, que integra este programa, analisa os estudos produzidos nos programas de pós-graduação sobre a “Formação Continuada de Professoras de Alfabetizadoras” que compõem o acervo do referido programa. Trata-se de um estudo bibliográfico que visa analisar teses e dissertações elaboradas no período de 2006 a 2012 que tomaram como referência para compreensão da temática a voz docente. As pesquisas buscaram, por meio dos depoimentos das professoras alfabetizadoras, esclarecer os significados por elas atribuídos aos cursos de formação contínua sobre alfabetização e letramento. O quadro teórico que norteia as reflexões acerca da formação e do trabalho docente fundamenta-se em André, Formosinho, Gatti, Giroux, Lessard, Nóvoa e Tardif e acerca de alfabetização e letramento, em Kleimam, Soares e Street. Os trabalhos analisados revelam a complexidade da formação docente e os diferentes caminhos metodológicos adotados para “ouvir as professoras” sobre seu desenvolvimento profissional. Ao darem voz às professoras alfabetizadoras, os pesquisadores possibilitaram que elas apresentassem diferentes aspectos e interfaces da formação contínua que durante a elaboração deste trabalho foram considerados dados fundamentais para análise: a relação entre as condições de trabalho docente e os cursos de alfabetização e letramento, ressaltando a relação entre formação e trabalho; os limites e as contribuições da formação contínua para a prática pedagógica das professoras alfabetizadoras; e a compreensão da formação contínua como formação de adultos profissionais.


Mediações de leitura literária na escola    

Márcia Mariana Santos de Oliveira Ramalho and Ana Maria Moares Scheffer, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora (BRAZIL); and Leuda Evangelista de Oliveira, Universidade Federal de Roraima (BRAZIL)

Language: Portuguese

Estudos desenvolvidos acerca da prática da leitura literária apontam que ao compreendermos a literatura como sendo expressão do ser humano e como ato transformador é fundamental considerar e reconhecer o papel que esta arte exerce na formação dos sujeitos e na participação destes na sociedade. Estando, portanto, a literatura presente na escola, torna-se necessário um trabalho que suscite a sua força humanizadora e desenvolva a formação leitora dos alunos. Para que isso aconteça é importante realizar o encontro efetivo entre o leitor e o texto literário a partir de uma mediação adequada que promova vivências significativas de leitura, com vistas a ir além dos fins pedagógicos. Por conta disso, o presente trabalho tem o objetivo de problematizar questões relacionadas aos temas da linguagem literária, da mediação de textos literários na escola e da constituição da literatura infantil a partir da teoria histórico-cultural, com base nos pensamentos de Vigotski e Bakhtin, e de estudos do campo da história da literatura infantil brasileira. Para tanto, abordaremos, inicialmente, as especificidades da palavra literária e, em seguida, o conceito de mediação e os processos de humanização e cultura que permeiam a prática de leitura literária. Por fim, refletiremos sobre a leitura e a literatura infantil, apontando como elas foram se constituindo ao longo da história da literatura no Brasil e as implicações disso, em nossos dias, para o ensino da literatura no contexto escolar. Por meio das reflexões apresentadas, consideramos que, sobretudo na escola pública, a mediação do texto literário precisa ser garantida de fato, pois é um direito fundamental da criança o acesso à literatura. Além disso, como instituição responsável pela formação de leitores, a escola precisa proporcionar vivências literárias que considerem o que é peculiar ao texto literário e tudo o que ele evoca.


A formação Literária do professor de Português do Ensino Básico

Ana Isabel Pinto, Escola Superior de Viana do Castelo (PORTUGAL) and María Lourdes Dionisio, Universidade do Minho (PORTUGAL)

Language: Portuguese

A educação literária detém nos curricula de língua um lugar privilegiado, apesar da variação de objetos e objetivos consoante os paradigmas que os circunscrevem (Sawyer, Van-de-Ven, 2007). Todavia, os estudos sobre a formação de professores neste domínio são escassos (Lopes, 2011). No quadro da relevância da educação literária na formação do futuro professor, este estudo visa compreender como se constrói o professor de Português para este objetivo cada vez mais central no currículo nacional (Buescu, 2015). O estudo sobre como e com que orientações se estão a formar os futuros professores de português, o qual nos permite ter uma antevisão de como se pode estar a formar o leitor literário na escola básica, inscreve-se num contexto em que cada vez mais se reclama “a urgência da realização de trabalhos voltados para a formação de professores de literatura” (Santos, 2010, p. 14), visando ultrapassar a reconhecida escassez de estudo neste domínio (Bernardes, 2010). Este estudo faz parte de uma pesquisa que envolveu tanto professores como alunos das licenciaturas em Educação Básica. Contudo, os dados que aqui apresentaremos são apenas os relativos às perceções dos professores sobre a formação literária dos alunos. Estes dados foram recolhidos por entrevista junto de sete docentes do ensino superior em Portugal. Generalizadamente, os professores acham que é importante a formação em Educação Literária dos docentes, nomeadamente para formar futuros leitores habituais. Há, também, um entendimento, sobre a necessidade de se articular conhecimentos, competências e atitudes nessa formação. Apesar destas perspetivas, quando se trata de avaliar, professores com conceções de Educação Literária que apontam para uma valorização da formação de leitores e do fomento do gosto pela leitura, estes utilizam, como principais instrumentos de avaliação, testes de saberes declarativos, os quais apontam para o privilégio destes saberes face às competências e às atitudes, na formação de professores.

Location: Aula 2532 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)

Presentation: AELE Team

Language: English


 Chinese 4th Grade Students’ Motivation to Read

Jin Lijun, Towson University (USA); Jiening Ruan and Hitomi Kambara, University of Oklahoma (USA)

Language: English

The study investigated 209 Chinese fourth graders’ motivation to read using the Reading Motivation Questionnaire by Wigfield and Guthrie (1997). Specifically, the researchers intended to identify if there is a statistically significant difference on the 11 motivation to read constructs among and between the three reading groups and two gender groups. The results show that significant differences exist among and between the high and low achievers in self-efficacy and compliance. Higher achievers demonstrated stronger motivation. Both extrinsic and intrinsic factors impact reading achievement. Significant differences between gender groups are also found in the motivation constructs: challenge, competition, social, and compliance.


The Effects of Storytelling and Story Reading on First Grade Students’ Story Comprehension and Retelling Skills, Kasim Yildirim, Seyit Ates, Fatih Akbay and Retelling Skills

Seyit Ates, Gazi University; Fatih Akbay, Ankara Sehit Komando Onbasi Mükremin Basaran Elementary School; Kasim Yildrim,

Muğla Sıtkı Koçman University; and Fatih Cetin Cetinkaya, Duzce University (TURKEY)

Language: English

This research aimed to explore the effects of storytelling and story reading on first-grade students’ making meaning and retelling skills. A total of 31 first-grade students constituted the research sample. For this quasi-experimental research, the first grade students were assigned to the treatment and control groups at random. In the treatment group, the stories were read to the students daily and after reading the stories, the informal conversations related to stories were occurred. All the daily activities, which included efferent and aesthetic dimensions based on Rosenblatt’s transactional theory, lasted around half an hour. In the story conversions, it was focused on story elements including characters, setting, plot, conflict, and resolution and the effects of stories on the students. For the pretest and posttest assessment of the first grade students, a grade level story was read to the students in both two groups and asked each one of them to retell the story. In addition, after retelling process, five Ws and one H technique was used to discuss the story and clarify reading comprehension levels of the students in the groups. This one-on-one assessment procedure was taken place for learning the awareness of the students on the story structure, if the student retells orderly the events the story, the sentence structures of the students, and the students’ reading comprehension levels. The results of the research were discussed the through the related literature and some and the profound implications of the research on first-grade students’ education were contended.


Writing a master dissertation – students’ difficulties and coping strategies      

José António Brandão Carvalho, Universidade do Minho (PORTUGAL); Rómina Laranjeira, Escola Superior de Educação de Coimbra (PORTUGAL); and Luísa Álvares Pereira, CIDTFF-DEP, Universidade de Aveiro (PORTUGAL)

Language: English

Students are supposed to write complex text genres in Higher Education contexts. Their complexity stems not only from the nature of the knowledge they convey but also from the norms and conventions adopted by the academic communities that use such texts. Among those genres, the master dissertation seems particularly complex, considering both the set of problems related to its genomic configuration (structure, language, norms of reference), and the factors that constrain its production (methodological procedures, student/supervisor relationship, time management, institutional constraints, individual nature of the writing process). The present study seeks (i) to identify and analyse students’ perspectives and representations of the dissertation writing process, (ii) the problems that arise in the writing process, (iii) finally, the strategies used to overcome them. Taking into account that academic communities have different procedures and conventions, the study also seeks (iv) to verify if such perspectives and representations vary according to the study field of the participants. The study is based on semi-structured interviews to students who recently completed their master thesis in the areas of Humanities, Education and Engineering. The analysis follows a theoretical-methodological framework guided by the definition of a writing process that, beyond the cognitive, linguistic and social dimensions, involves an emotional dimension that can condition it decisively. Its results may therefore contribute to the knowledge in the emerging field of Academic Literacies and can also be a reference for the teaching of academic writing in Higher Education.


Moroccan-themed books do double duty in the classroom:  A cultural-sociological experiment of how to stimulate both pupils’ reading and their intercultural attitudes

Margot Belet, University of Leuven (BELGIUM)

Language: English

This paper questions the search for a literary education that appeals to pupils from all ethnicities. Instead, it sees adolescents’ book appreciation – and, in turn, their reading intentions – as a social practice dependent on the ‘fit’ between used book content and youngsters’ ethnic self-identifications. Secondly, the paper also examines whether the use of a Moroccan-themed book can improve pupils’ intercultural attitudes. An experiment is conducted among 977 pupils in 63 classes of 15 secondary schools, in a Belgian province with a history of Moroccan immigration. Belgium is chosen because – compared to other EU countries – it exhibited the widest gap in PISA 2009 reading scores between pupils without an immigrant background and second-generation immigrants (Jacobs & Rea 2011: 55-57). During two course hours, some classes read fragments from a ‘typically Belgian-themed’ book together, whilst others read from a ‘Moroccan-themed’ book. The results indicate that pupils who appreciate the used book also plan to read more in the next six months. The book appreciation of those who do not identify as Moroccan does not vary according to whether a ‘Moroccan’ or ‘Belgian’ book is used. By contrast, pupils who see themselves as Moroccan appreciate the used book more if it is ‘Moroccan-themed’. This effect does not depend on the classroom’s ethnic composition. With regard to pupils’ intercultural attitudes, the results support Allport’s (1954) ‘contact hypothesis’. Indeed, the use of a Moroccan book has a double effect: 1) among those who identify as Belgian, it improves the attitude towards Moroccans, especially in classrooms with few Moroccan pupils; 2) among those who identify as Moroccan, it improves the attitude towards Belgians, but only in classrooms with a moderate to large concentration of Moroccan pupils.

Location: Aula 2533 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)

Presentation: LUCIENE DA COSTA SILVA, Centro de Educación Infantil y Primaria “Victoria Kent”, Rivas Vaciamadrid (SPAIN)

Language: Portuguese / Spanish (it is indicated in each case)


La formación de lectores críticos: un reto para maestros noveles frente a propósitos de convivencia y paz

Sonia Gómez Benítez, Universidad Industrial de Santander (COLOMBIA)

Language: Spanish

Este texto presenta las ideas de fundamentación epistemológica de la práctica pedagógica de los maestros noveles de la Escuela de Educación de la Universidad Industrial de Santander, la cual es asumida como objeto de reflexión crítica, una vía para pensar en alternativas de innovación de la enseñanza desde los planteamientos de Schön para la formación de profesionales en educación autónomos, destacados, críticos e innovadores con capacidad de desempeñar un papel activo en la construcción de conocimientos. Con diseño metodológico de Investigación Acción, la propuesta “Secuencias didácticas para la lectura crítica con niños, niñas y jóvenes del posconflicto” se propone explorar   estrategias de enseñanza para la lectura crítica en país como Colombia que requiere de lectores críticos que fomenten la reconciliación y paz lejos de los rencores de la guerra. Los maestros noveles se enfrentan a grandes retos como el auge de la información inmediata e irreflexiva que de igual forma provoca reacciones inmediatas producto de la manipulación de los medios de comunicación. De un enfoque gramatical recurrimos a lo sociocultural discursivo. La razón tiene que ver con la necesidad ingente de formar lectores críticos, responsables y hábiles para la selección de información. Al respecto Van Dijk (1997) afirma que la propaganda política, la publicidad, los sermones religiosos, las directivas empresariales y los artículos académicos influyen sobre el pensamiento del receptor, y agrega: “todo imparte conocimiento, afecta las opiniones y cambia actitudes”. Y aunque el receptor tiene la plena libertad para ignorar o desechar las intenciones del emisor, la realidad nos ha demostrado que cada vez nuestros jóvenes son más influenciables; carentes del conocimiento de las reglas y estrategias gramaticales o del discurso, se enfrentan a la expresión y compresión sin capacidad de réplica o de una ideología contrastada para argumentar en contra de un texto o un acto de habla influyente.


Leitura de Textos Sincréticos Verbovisuais:  relações entre linguagens em (fan)zines brasileiros         

Ruth Rejane Perleberg Lerm, Instituto Federal de Educação Ciência e Tecnologia Sul-rio-grandense, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (BRAZIL)

Language: Portuguese

Nesta investigação damos continuidade aos estudos sobre leitura de textos sincréticos verbovisuais, tendo como objeto empírico os fanzines, publicações alternativas de pequena circulação, que se situam nas interfaces entre arte, design, literatura e cultura visual. Na escolha do objeto empírico, bem como na delimitação do corpus de análise, consideramos algumas particularidades da obra de Barthes. Corroboraram com essa escolha, o crescente interesse pelos fanzines nas áreas de Educação, Comunicação e Design, o surgimento e expansão dos zine fests e a escassez de publicações e estudos acadêmicos sobre o assunto no Brasil. Como objetivo geral, estudamos os efeitos de sentido advindos das relações entre as linguagens envolvidas nos zines. Para tanto, contamos com o aporte teórico e metodológico da semiótica discursiva, em especial as contribuições de Barros, Fiorin, Teixeira, Greimas e Courtés. Para pensar especificamente as relações entre as linguagens no plano de expressão, buscamos aproximações com Hjelmslev e Carmo Jr. A partir das análises de Pequeno compêndio dos fantasmas interiores, de Ale Kalko; Acordo mal e Em branco, de Hannah Uesugi constatamos entre seus componentes relações de interdependência que, por sua vez, foram examinadas quanto a três dimensões: aproximação/afastamento; coerência/incoerência e subjetividade/objetividade. Sugerimos que tais dimensões também estejam presentes nas relações entre linguagens acionadas em outros textos sincréticos verbovisuais. Com isso, pretendemos colaborar tanto para o ensino da arte como para pesquisas que tenham como objeto empírico de estudo manifestações sincréticas verbovisuais. Além de apresentarmos o zine como potente material para experimentação expressiva e conceitual também proporcionamos subsídios teóricos e metodológicos para o aprofundamento da leitura de imagens, com base nos aportes da semiótica discursiva. Por outro lado, com o estudo das relações entre linguagens pensadas como dimensões esperamos contribuir para uma sistematização da leitura do plano de expressão de textos sincréticos, ainda em construção na semiótica discursiva.


Literatura e Artes. Por uma Pedagogia Crítica e Criativa

Rita Gomes da Silva Basilio, FCSH – Universidade Nova de Lisboa (PORTUGAL)

Language: Portuguese

Proponho a apresentação de algumas das linhas teóricas e de acção do projecto-piloto Motiv-Arte, concebido para fomentar e promover a leitura literária em conexão simbiótica com as práticas de expressão artística (ilustração, artes plásticas, teatro, fotografia). O projecto (que apresento como caso de investigação em acção) é desenvolvido num Agrupamento português de escolas públicas (em regime não-formal) e tem como missão garantir a qualidade e equidade no acesso ao desenvolvimento de competências de literacia (linguística, literária e artística) a crianças de todas as classes sociais. Apresentam-se exemplos concretos de acção: das práticas de leitura artística em sala de aula, passando pela participação num “livro colaborativo” incluído num projecto de Educação Artística que integra diferentes comunidades a nivel nacional, até às práticas de interacção comunitária (dentro e fora da escola). Este artigo está inserido numa investigação de pós-doutoramento intitulada “Por uma Pedagogia Criativa”. É objetivo desta investigação demonstrar a imprescindibilidade – na promoção de uma literacia profíqua, consciente e crítica – do ensino precoce da Literatura (em contexto escolar e não escolar) como forma de desenvolvimento do amor pela língua e do imaginário criativo (tanto na interpretação quanto na expressão); do sentido estético e crítico conducente ao desenvolvimento de uma consciência actuante e colaborativa e de um pensamento autónomo sobre a própria existência e sobre o mundo circundante. O campo metodológico que me orienta e informa concentra-se numa investigação em Teoria da Literatura e Filosofia da Linguagem, sob o foco de uma inter-relação entre Literatura e Vida. Autores como Gilles Deleuze, Jacques Derrida, Wittgestein, Paul de Man, entre outros, são os polos orientadores desta abordagem.


A formação de leitores na educação básica: passose (des) compassos  

Ana Lucia Nunes da Cunha Vilela and Ana Carolina Vilela-Ardenghi, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso (BRAZIL)

Language: Portuguese

Início do século XXI e a formação de leitores e escritores competentes e autônomos continua sendo um dos maiores desafios das escolas de educação básica. É frequente, no Brasil, a mídia noticiar que os alunos não gostam de ler e que uma crônica crise cognitiva assola o país em virtude dos poucos que entendem o que leem. Somam-se a esses fatos as reclamações dos professores universitários de que os estudantes têm pouca capacidade para compreender os textos lidos. As dificuldades são atribuídas, invariavelmente, a falhas no ensino da língua escrita desde a educação infantil. A presente pesquisa investiga a didática da linguagem escrita dos professores dos anos iniciais do ensino fundamental a partir de algumas questões: a forma como tem sido trabalhada a leitura na escola possibilita formar leitores? O que fazer para que os alunos gostem de ler? Por que o brasileiro lê tão pouco? Por conta dos pais que não leem? Pela competição com a internet, o celular e a televisão? Ou é a nossa cultura escolar que não consegue despertar na criança o gosto pela leitura no momento em que ela está mais apta a adquiri-lo? Ancorados nos estudos de Smith (1981), Jolibert (1994), Kaufman (1995), Lerner (2001), Kleiman (1990) buscamos respostas a essas questões em escolas da rede pública de Cuiabá, Mato Grosso, Brasil. Os resultados apresentados indicam que o desgosto pela leitura é iniciado na escola pelo pouco uso da literatura infantil e, muitas vezes, trabalhada como pretexto para estudos gramaticais, conteúdos morais e de outros campos do conhecimento, a insuficiente fundamentação teórica dos docentes sobre leitura e consequente falta de ferramentas didáticas sobre como propiciar essa aprendizagem. Aponta, também, como um dos aspectos mais importantes a falta de professores leitores para conduzir esse processo.

Location: Aula 2534 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)

Presentation: AELE Team

Language: English


Strategies for developing kindergarten children’s narrative skills

Helen Vretudaki and Eufimia Tafa, University of Crete (GREECE)

Language: English

The purpose of this study was to examine whether particular strategies such as story retelling or the creation of fictional stories enhance kindergarten children’s narrative skills. One hundred and thirteen kindergarteners (58 boys and 55 girls) aged 5 to 6 years old from 10 different kindergarten classes participated in two experimental and one control group. Children in the first experimental group were trained in story retelling, while children in the second experimental group were trained in the creation of fictional stories. Eight books were read to the first experimental group being trained in story retelling, while another eight books were read to the children of the second experimental group who were being trained to create fictional stories. One book per week was read to each group and the intervention program lasted for a total of 8 weeks. Results showed that in both experimental groups there were significant differences in the children’s narrative skills before and after the intervention program compared to the children from the control group. It seems that both strategies, story retelling and the creation of fictional stories, enhanced almost equally kindergarteners’ narrative skills. The implications of this study are encouraging regarding the use of effective strategies in kindergarten classrooms that aim to develop young children’s narrative skills.


Using Reading Games as Method to Improve Reading Fluency Skills    

Kadi Lukanenok, Estonian Reading Association (ESTONIA)

Language: English

Reading fluency is considered as fast, precise and expressive reading process which is conducted effortlessly. Reading fluency consists of three parts: a) reading accuray b) reading speed and automaticity c) expressive reading and comprehension. Reading fluency is an essential aspect of mature reading. Some students, esp. those who struggle in learning to read need special training and teaching methods to develop and master their reading fluency skills. Lot of special instructions are elaborated to facilitate efforts on learning to read. Despite that, unfortunately reading fluency is quite often underestimated and out of teachers and parents attention and concern. Using reading games would be benefit and facilitate the reading process, esp in the beginning of formal reading training phase and struggling readers. Current presentation will give the theorethical overview, will shed the led on the research and will share the practical excperiences about the fluency training process with struggling readers. Methodological teaching materials and instruvtions will be demonstrated and commented.


Promoting kindergarteners’ comprehension skills through story book reading    

Elissavet Chlapana, University of Crete (GREECE)

Language: English

The present study describes a two-month literacy intervention program aiming to help kindergarteners develop essential comprehension skills through reading stories. The program was implemented by 56 third-year kindergarten student teachers of the Department of Preschool Education of the University of Crete in 15 kindergarten classrooms located in Rethymno, Crete. Student teachers were trained by the researcher to implement 8 daily literacy teaching programs to help kindergarteners develop the following comprehension skills; prediction, background knowledge activation, vocabulary, questioning, and retelling of story structure. Each daily program was developed as it follows. In the first stage, student teachers conducted a playful introductory activity with children, e.g. a memory game, a puzzle, a game of hidden treasure, to help them discover story characters and elements of the story plot. Based on the discovered elements, they encouraged children to make predictions and activate their background knowledge about the story theme. In the second stage, they read the story by applying a performance-oriented or a dialogic reading approach. The goal of the performance-oriented reading approach was to help children process story structure elements through guided conversations. The goal of dialogic reading was to enhance children’s story comprehension and oral language development through appropriate techniques, such as open-ended questions, vocabulary explanation and extension. In the final stage, student teachers conducted post-reading activities with children to attain cross-curricular goals and deepen story comprehension. Intervention teaching sessions were recorded and transcribed. Data analysis provided indications with regards to children’s story understanding and to the development of the targeted comprehension skills.


Promoting oral texts in kindergarten classrooms – development of a new test to measure oral text abilities of kindergarten students   

Dieter Isler, Claudia Hefti Christ, Iris Dinkelmann and Katharina Kirchhofer; University of Teacher Education of Thurgau (SWITZERLAND)

Language: English

Challenging communicative tasks such as reporting experiences, inventing stories, explaining facts or negotiating points of view are essential in classroom communication and crucial for successful academic learning. However, the children’s familiarity with these «oral texts» varies depending on the linguistic and educational practices of their families. Research has shown that adults’ interactive support clearly facilitates the acquisition of language abilities on the text or discourse level. But recent studies on language practices in playgroups, daycare institutions and kindergarten classrooms reveal that educators and teachers do not yet focus enough on promoting these abilities. The intervention study «Promoting oral texts in kindergarten classrooms» aims at supporting teachers to purposefully and effectively promote the production of oral texts in everyday kindergarten communication. In a pre-post-follow-up-design with intervention and control group we will measure the quality of teacher interaction and the abilities of the children to produce oral texts. The tools needed for the measurement of these variables are currently being developed and tested. In our contribution we will focus on a new test for the measurement of children’s oral text abilities: In an individual setting, the children first watch a short animated movie (free of verbal language) and then retell the story to the researcher. The video recordings are transcribed and the children’s oral text productions extracted. These productions are assessed using a standardized rating instrument. The theoretical foundations, the materials and procedures, the rating instrument and the results of a trial (N = 110 children) will be presented and discussed. Our contribution connects to category no. 7 of the conference call « Learning to teach reading and writing».


Location: Aula 3201 (third floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)

Presentation: AELE Team

Language: English


Morphological awareness interactions with reading and spelling across languages     

George Manolitsis, University of Crete (GREECE); George K. Georgiou, University of Alberta (USA); and Alain Desrochers, University of Ottawa (USA)

Language: English

An increasing number of studies are confirming the important role for morphological awareness (the ability to identify and manipulate intentionally the morphemic structure of words) in the learning of reading and spelling skills in several languages. The present cross-linguistic study examined longitudinally how morphological awareness -measured in three different times from the end of grade 1 until the end of grade 2- associated interactively with word reading and spelling across three languages. The sample of participants included 606 children: native speakers of Greek (N=218), English (N=151) and French (N=237) They were assessed on word reading identification, word reading speed tasks and spelling tasks at the end of grade 1 (Time 1), at the beginning (Time 2) and at the end of grade 2 (Time 3). Word reading accuracy and speed tasks as well as the morphological awareness tasks were designed so as to be equivalent across the three languages. Three sets of cross-lagged analyses were performed between morphological awareness and each literacy skill separately for each language group. Morphological awareness was found to be more important for learning to read words in the less consistent orthographies (English and French) than in Greek. Learning to spell was predicted by morphological awareness development in all three language groups, but children’s spelling contributed to their morphological awareness growth more in the less consistent orthographies than in Greek. The role of morphological awareness on learning word reading and spelling and the impact of the orthographic consistency for each one of the three tested languages will be discussed.


Reading in two languages: A miscue analysis of two bilingual Spanish/English readers          

María Gabriela López Jaramillo, Southern Illinois University (USA)

Language: English

The purpose of this study is to conduct a reading miscue analysis with Spanish/English bilingual children, ages 10 to 15 who have been living in the United States for varying lengths of time. This study is based on the understanding that reading is an active search for meaning that requires studying the relationships between the reader’s thought process, language, and sociocultural settings in which both the reader and the text are changed during the process (Rosenblatt, 1978; Goodman, 1996; Marek, & Edelsky, 1999). Reading also requires the reader to select the most productive and necessary language cues that will allow him/her to make sense of the text. Moreover, the reader’s selection of syntactic, semantic, and graphophonic cues requires him/her to make predictions about the coming text. Because of the intense interaction occurring in the reader’s mind, he/she could miscue when making these predictions. A miscue is a place in which a reader’s observed response (what the reader reads) does not match the expected response (what is printed in the text) (Goodman, Watson, & Burke, 2005). The term miscue is used instead of the term mistake because of the negative connotations associated with the words error and mistake. Miscue analysis enables researchers and teachers to observe patterns that occur in oral reading and target appropriate strategies to the individual reader. There is an identified gap in reading research with bilingual children, especially with regard to the growing number of Spanish speakers in mainstream English classrooms and the number of Spanish speakers who are considered struggling readers. This study aims to address this gap and to provide insight into reading patterns of children who speak Spanish at home and English at school and in the greater community.


 

An Investigation of Linguistic Structures and Stylistic Devices of Sport Headlines in Persian and English Newspapers

Azizeh Chalak, Islamic Azad University, Isfahan Branch (IRAN)

Language: English

Newspapers are one of the most important forms of media. Among the contents of the newspapers, the headlines have received great attention because of their role in persuading the readers to buy the newspaper and read the essays. The present study focused on the differences and similarities in the linguistic structures and stylistic devices in sport-section headlines of Iranian Persian and English newspapers. To this end, 100 sport headlines were collected from two Iranian Persian and two Iranian English newspapers published in during a ten-day period summer 2016. Shams’ framework of linguistic structures and stylistic devices was used to analyze the collected corpus. The results indicated that linguistic structures and stylistic devices were more frequently used in the Persian headlines than in the English ones. The findings also showed that metaphor was used most frequently in both Persian and English headlines, but rhyme was the least frequently used device in the Persian headlines, while, rhyme, alliteration, and homophony were least frequently used devices in the English ones. On the other hand, in terms of linguistic structures, deletion and action deletion were used most frequently in the Persian headlines, while in the English ones, space saving punctuations were used as the most frequently used structure. In the Persian headlines, acronyms and abbreviations were used the least, but for English sport headlines, pre-modification was used the least. The findings of this study could be beneficial for ESP students and teachers in journalism and help them to identify the devices and structures to improve developing and studying the journalistic texts and enhance cohesion and coherence of newspaper articles.


Location: Aula 3202 (third floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)

Presentation: AELE Team

Language: English


Reading comprehension: testing dime model in Turkish elementary school context from low socioeconomic background

Kasim Yildirim, Muğla Sıtkı Koçman University (TURKEY); Fatih Cetin Cetinkaya, Duzce University (TURKEY); Seyit Ates, Gazi University (TURKEY); and Dudu Kaya, Pamukkale University (TURKEY)

Language: English

Given the literature related to reading comprehension, there is accumulating research exploring underlying factors of reading comprehension. However, there is lack of research on underlying factors of reading comprehension in students from low socioeconomic backgrounds influences comprehension process and outcomes. Comprehension is a complex task that draws on many different cognitive skills and processes. Unfortunately, our knowledge of the unique contribution that these different skills and processes make to reading comprehension development is limited because the majority of work in this field has focused on a single component skill. The present research aimed to test the direct and inferential mediation model (DIME) in Turkish elementary school context from low socioeconomic background. The model hypothesizes relationships among background knowledge, inferences, reading comprehension strategies, vocabulary, and word reading and addresses the direct and mediated effects of these 5 predictors on comprehension. The research sample consisted of 200 fourth-grade students from elementary school. The results showed that there were some significant relations among the variables having the effects on reading comprehension. Through the results, the authors gave some practical implications.


The relations between reading comprehension and reading fluency: Their reciprocal roles as an indicator and a predictor

Kasim Yildirim, Muğla Sıtkı Koçman University (TURKEY); Seyit Ates, Gazi University (TURKEY); Fatih Cetin Cetinkaya, Duzce University (TURKEY); and Dudu Kaya, Pamukkale University (TURKEY)

Language: English

There are several theories, which include automaticity theory, verbal efficiency theory, and instance theory of automaticity, explain the reasons why reading fluency is needed for literacy development. Considering these theories, word recognition automaticity, word recognition accuracy, and prosody emerge as important components of reading and comprehension processes. While a number of studies have shown that there are positive and strong relationships between reading fluency components and reading comprehension, there is a relative lack of research into the this field focusing on their reciprocal relations as an indicator and predictor. In the current research, we aimed to explore the relations between reading comprehension and reading fluency and their connections with each other as an indicator and a predictor. For this overall aim, a total of 100 students from every grade level ranging 6th to 8th were enrolled. This research took place in fall semester, 2015, in Turkey’s Denizli province. The participants from the all grade levels were willing and available to take part in the present study (however, the sample chosen was not representative of the population. Thus, we did not generalize the results from our sample to the population). Informed consent letters were obtained from all of the participants and their parents or guardians. The participants were relatively homogenous and of middle socioeconomic (SES) status. They ranged in age from 13 through 15 years. The participants of the recent research were not identified as learning disabled and their reading development was felt to be within grade level expectations according to their classroom teachers and the school counselor. All of the participants in the research were considered typically developing readers by their teachers. The predominant language (native language) of the students from all grade levels was Turkish and they were not fluent speakers of English. For the measures of fluency components were taken from students’ oral reading of the same texts including narrative and expository according to grade levels. After then, the students’ reading comprehension levels were assessed. Every comprehension test for the grade levels included a narrative text and an expository text, and 12 questions were prepared for every text, six of which were literal and another five of which were inferential. The path analyses were used to identify the relations between reading fluency and reading comprehension. According to results of the research, some recommendations were given.


A landscape of literacy programmes in Europe: features and perspectives

Juliana Cunha and Lourdes Dionisio, Centro de Investigação em Educação, Instituto de Educação da Universidade do Minho (PORTUGAL)

Language: English

After the dissemination of PIACC and PISA first results, which pointed toward a huge ‘problem’ of (i)literacy in Europe, the popular theory on the consequences of literacy spread rapidly in public discourses about the need of a quality education that allows citizens’ full participation in a society dominated by written word. Due to this literacy challenge facing the European Countries, particularly the OECD members, important political decisions took place at educational level. Indeed, many EU-funded programmes have been implemented, striving, on the one hand, to analyse the educational policies and, on the other hand, to improve students’ performance in the international assessments. In the scope of a study developed at University of Minho – within the framework of ELINET project (European Literacy Policy Network – EAC/S05/2013) –, whose main goal is to characterize adolescents’ literacy policies and practices from Portugal, Spain, Greece, Romania, and Ireland, in this text we seek to: (a) present data gathered and analysis procedures used in the research, and (b) describe 18 literacy initiatives/programmes from the mentioned countries. The description is based on a content analysis of the programmes documents, considering six categories: intervention area, goals, activities, participants and/or promoters, contexts, and resources. The findings show several similarities among the studied examples. The most important one is the fact of the programmes conceptual basis is underpinned by a traditional approach of literacy, whereby literacy is a technical ability to read, and more rarely to write, that once acquired – almost always in educational learning environment – can be applied in any situation or context. In fact, the studied initiatives occur mainly in school settings, with teacher’s supervision and support. Additionally, given its goals and activities, the majority intends to promote reading, especially reading for pleasure, and/or the use of the literary book by itself, neglecting writing and other reading purposes.


Investigating Summer Reading Percentile Changes in Comprehension among a NationalSample of Fourth grade Students

Laurie CampbellGlenn Lambie, Haiyan Bai and Debbie Hahs-Vaughn; University of Central Florida (USA)

Language: English

The purpose of the current investigation included examining and investigating the relationship between fourth grade students’ changes in percentile of comprehension during the summer based on their percentile ranking at the beginning of the summer. The study addressed a known gap in the literature related to understanding elementary school students’ summer reading losses based on percentile rankings and curriculum-based measures.  The sample was a national sample of fourth grade students currently living in the United States from diverse cultures and backgrounds. Participants in this study were elementary school students in fourth grade (N = 118,478) from across the United States that completed fourth grade during the spring of 2014. Utilizing a curriculum based measure, ISIP-AR, an analysis of fourth grades students’ percentile changes in comprehension were analyzed from the beginning of the summer to the beginning of the new school year by academic level.  Results suggested that students of all academic levels, in all percentiles can experience reading losses during the summer months when not in school, implying that all students need to practice their reading skills as reading losses can be realized at every academic level. Those students in the highest percentile exhibited the most stability in Lexile and reading comprehension. However, students in the lowest percentiles exhibited a great amount of growth than students in the median percentiles. It was unknown if any of the students participated in established summer reading program, or technology enabled reading apps and games. The international implications for all educational stakeholders include investigating summer programs and technology enabled reading apps that students participate in to determine their effectiveness towards summer reading regression and to consider established curriculum-based measures instead of reading list and standardized achievement scores to measure summer reading progress.

Location: ground floor, center aisle (Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)

Presentation: ALMUDENA CANO CABELLO, University Complutense of Madrid

Language:  Spanish / German (it is indicated in each case)


Arbeitsplatzorientierte Grundbildung Erwachsener: die Verwendung von Einfacher Sprache mit arbeitsplatzspezifischer Modifizierung

Peter Piasecki, Institut für Leichte Sprache und Bildungsforschung (GERMANY)

Language: German

In Unternehmen steigen in Anbetracht des wirtschaftlichen Wandels und der demographischen Entwicklung die Anforderungen an die Erwerbstätigen: Bedienungsanleitungen müssen verstanden und umgesetzt werden, schriftliche Arbeitsanweisungen befolgt und branchenspezifische Formulare ausgefüllt und weiterverarbeitet werden. Arbeitsplatzorientierte Grundbildung stellt somit eine wesentliche Voraussetzung für die Sicherung des Arbeitsplatzes sowie die damit verbundene gesellschaftliche Teilhabe dar. Auch Anglizismen gewinnen zunehmend an Bedeutung; sie müssen richtig übersetzt und angewendet. Insbesondere im wirtschaftlichen Sekundärsektor ist der Anteil funktionaler Analphabeten mit Grundbildungsbedarf unverhältnismäßig hoch. In Hilfsarbeiterpositionen sind es zum Beispiel 56 Prozent aller Beschäftigten (Grotlüschen & Riekmann, 2012). Insgesamt ist im Kontext des Lernens am Arbeitsplatz in dieser Zielgruppe dabei ein Kernbereich zu beachten: Alle Texte müssen dem Grundgedanken „Leichte Sprache“ verpflichtet sein, um die angesprochene Zielgruppe auch wirklich zu erreichen (Piasecki, 2015). Leichte Sprache, wie sie etwa heute in der BITV 2.0 definiert ist, der ersten rechtlichen Vorschrift auf Bundesebene in Deutschland, stellt dabei jedoch nur einen Orientierungspunkt dar. Leichte Sprache im berufsbezogenen Kontext erfordert auf Grund der Fachsprache sowie der Arbeitsprozesse spezifische Anpassungen. Aus diesem Grund soll hier ein Rahmenkonzept vorgestellt werden, welches-in Weiterentwicklung eines vom Autor verantworteten Forschungs- und Entwicklungsprojekts des Bundesministeriums für Bildung und Forschung-Rahmenregeln für Einfache Sprache im betrieblichen Kontext beinhaltet. Zusätzlich sollen Hinweise auf den Europäischen Referenzrahmen für Sprache im Zusammenhang mit dem entwickelten Rahmenkonzept gegeben werden.


Original Children’s Literature Expressed as Digital Story within a Clinical Model

Melissa Pendleton and Andrea Paganelli, Western Kentucky University (USA)

Language: English

Engaging teacher candidates in authentic practice is at the forefront of teacher preparation across the United States (CAEP, 2015).  Additionally, teacher candidates need more authentic, embedded opportunities to incorporate technology and literacy in school settings during clinical experiences, (Borsheim, Merritt, & Reed, 2008).  With the rise in importance and relevance of 21st Century skills, teachers need to understand, more than ever, how to embed technology and literacy within the classroom setting. The richness of semiotics paired with multimodalities via technology creates significant opportunities for P-12 students to learn (e.g., Shanahan, 2012; Spires et al., 2012); however, practitioners must first learn how to merge these constructs.  Digital stories allow focus on semiotic elements that create multimodal learning experiences that address P-12 student learning requirements, styles and interests giving preservice teachers an opportunity to connect P-12 students with learning in a meaningful, deliberate and instantly engaging manner. The present study addresses this complex challenge by showing how teacher candidates created original children’s literature in the form of digital stories for their P-12 students within a clinical model. Through a step-by-step process, the researchers explain how to create digital stories that align with standards and students’ needs. The preservice teachers with guidance from currently practicing teachers and university faculty employed multiple measures of P-12 student data, curricular mapping, standards and Universal Design lesson plan template to engage students with customized learning experiences. University faculty may learn how to use digital stories as a formative assessment for gaining insight into teacher candidates’ understandings of concepts of print, text features, text complexity, and reading development. Practitioners may learn how to create digital stories that align with their students’ interests and abilities for use in their classroom.


Finding on the underlying linguistic-cognitive relationships of reading acquisition in the initial phase

Maria Pintye-Sós and Sándor Rózsa, ELTE University (HUNGRY)

Language: English

The ability to decode, produce and understand written language is the crucial for participation in our knowledge-based society. Since this is an evolutionally „new” human ability our brain is not provided with direct modul specialized for written language. However we rely on the existing cognitive (visual and linguistic) structures. These mechanisms transform during the writing and reading acquisition and form a network specialising in written language, which enables the skillled reading. The topical researches mainly focused on cognitive skills underlying reading acquisition, like phonological awareness (PA), rapid automatic naming (RAN) and the phonological short term memory (PSM, VSM). The key-questions of the current research is: How we – as speech-language therapists – can recognise the disorder, or the risk of learning to read as soon as possible in early school-age? How the process of this recognition can be regulated: screening, evaluation, assassement? This is a quasi-longitudinal study, which escort 148 children on the way of the process of learning to read, from the last year of kindergarten through the first year of school. We explore the developmental dynamics of linguistic-cognitive indicators, like PA), RAN and the PSM, VSM; We explore also the reading achievement, like letter sound recognition on alphabetic principle (LSR), Word- and nonword recognition (WR), reading comprehension with sentences (RC) from two aspects: failures (ESPAX) and timing. Based on our research and the following results, we worked out a linguistic-skill training program for first grade children as a daily activity in the classroom, to prepare the learning to read.


Matching Reading Strategies with Purposes and Text Types

Adrián Rodríguez and Eva Fjällström, Luleå University of Technology (SWEDEN)

Language: English

The last two decades’ rapid expansion of information and communication technology (ICT) has resulted in remarkable changes in the kinds of literacies needed to function effectively. Today, teenagers need to be able to vary their reading practices to manage different kinds of texts (e.g. film, images, web & literary), and to adjust the way they read to suit their reason for reading. Until recently, teenagers have been assumed to be “digital natives” (Prensky, 2001) who acquire digital literacy through their extensive exposure to ICT. However, alongside decreasing levels of traditional reading literacy in several OECD countries (PISA, 2015), studies also show that students at various levels of education struggle to locate and evaluate web-based information (e.g. SHG, 2016). Against this background, our project investigates how Swedish adolescent EFL readers can learn to adjust their reading strategies to suit different text types and reading purposes. The project examines teenagers’ web-based reading skills as well as their reading of literary texts, identifies areas of weakness and evaluates teaching activities that can enable students to read more effectively. Empirical data in the form of search logs, classroom observations (field notes and video-recordings), teaching material, oral and written student responses and interviews form the basis of the analysis. Our preliminary findings indicate that many of the participants need to learn how to distinguish faction from fiction and to develop advanced reading skills such as inferential reasoning, interpretation and evaluation. Some well-designed literary activities have been found to enable the development of these competences and in the following steps of the project we will examine how the students’ current online research and comprehension skills (ORC) are most efficiently reinforced.

C Parallel sessions (Wednesday, 5 July – from 4.15 p.m. to 5.45 p.m.): WORKSHOPS

Rapporteur at the workshop: KRISHNA CART, Young Scholars Circle (USA)

Presentation: AELE Team

Language: English

Location: Aula 2531 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)


This workshop will equip grades one to eight coaches, teachers and specialists in teaching and modeling a short yet explicit focus lesson to develop strategic readers and writers. Focus Lesson is based on the Gradual Release of Responsibility Model (Pearson and Gallagher, 1983). This model requires that the teacher shift from “assuming all the responsibility for performing a task to a situation in which the students assume all of the responsibility” (Duke & Pearson, 2002, p. 211). Learn how you can incorporate powerful teacher language to suit various students’ needs. Focus Lesson can be applied in a variety of whole class and small group instructional settings in reading and writing workshop block. Explore ways on how to gradually release the responsibility to the learners using effective teacher language. Participants will learn how to: a. Model effectively on learning a new strategy. b. Strategically guide students to apply the strategy. c. Create some venues for students to transfer their newly learned skills.

Rapporteur at thworkshop:

ELAINE BUKOWIECKI, Bridgewater State University (USA)

Presentation: AELE Team

Language: English

Location: Aula 2532 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)


In this interactive workshop, the importance of including literacy skills instruction in all content subjects (mathematics, science, social studies, and language arts) will be discussed. The presenter will begin this workshop by asking participants to describe the manner in which they instruct students to read and respond to content materials. Following this introductory activity, the presenter will describe a brief rationale and research base for the inclusion of literacy skills instruction in each content subject. The major part of this workshop will include the presenter demonstrating specific literacy activities for content-area teaching and learning, followed by the audience practicing selected literacy techniques. These demonstrated literacy practices will include prior knowledge activation; vocabulary knowledge; reading comprehension; and response to the topic by means of writing, the creative arts, and further research. Additionally, the presenter will describe the importance of evaluating information found on the Internet. This workshop will conclude with a participant conversation regarding the value of including literacy skills in content-area instruction.

Rapporteurs at thworkshop:

  • STACEY ALEMANY, Avon Public Schools (USA)
  • LYNDA M. VALERIE, Central Connecticut State University (USA)
  • MARGARET CRAIG, Tru-u LLC (USA)

Presentation: AELE Team

Language: English

Location: Aula 2533 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)


The definition of literacy remains a popular topic amongst educators, politicians, and researchers alike, fueled by the impact of technology within the world of education. While reading and writing remain in the forefront of literacy instruction, educators around the world have begun to reconsider what it means to be literate within this technologically advancing age. With substantial research highlighting the power of visual literacy, it is imperative to incorporate visual literacy into our instructional practices. By educating students to understand and communicate through visual modes, teachers empower their students with the necessary tools to thrive in increasingly media-varied environments. Traditionally, authors used language to convey messages, while drawing upon text features such as images and graphs to support those ideas. However, with a generational shift built upon the speed of technology, authors are turning to visuals to convey messages and supporting those ideas with text. Kress argues that graphics hold more meaning and are central to the meaning of modern texts and meaning-making systems. (Kress, 1998). Images, either solo or paired with text, such as word clouds, graphic novels, photographs, visual presentations, visual poetry, and videos provide opportunities for students and educators alike to express and interpret meaningful text, but through the lens of visual literacy. Visual literacy can also serve as a vehicle for strengthening family literacy, as several studies demonstrate that when family members are engaged in supporting their children’s learning at home, the results tend to be higher student achievement. This is especially important with young children because children who start out as high performers tend to remain that way. Straightforward, hands on projects and assignments that combine academic content and family funds of knowledge help to build home school partnerships. Much research demonstrates that while multi-media has impacted the way in which information is communicated within classrooms, it has also impacted communication at home. Therefore, building the bridge to embrace families in this new learning inevitably benefits learning for all. Our modern technology-driven society demands a new level of communication that is just beginning to be explored within the world of education. This workshop focuses on providing educators strategies to incorporate visual literacy within and across instruction in order to deepen student learning, as well as activities that strengthen the home-school literacy connection. Educators will learn how word clouds and images can be implemented within the classroom as a means of communicating essential learning in any content area, blending both graphics and traditional text.

Rapporteurs at thworkshop:

  • WALTER EVANS
  • VALERIE CATO
  • MARY LANDRUM
  • ELIZABETH THOMPSON

Augusta University (USA)

Presentation: AELE Team

Language: English

Location: Aula 2534 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)


We will introduce our five free digital resources. Four are available for free online and each attendee will receive a free copy of the fifth, an English language DVD with 10 hours of audio, full text, and classic illustrations. We invite interested individuals or institutions to collaborate with us to create versions of all five resources for free distribution in their home languages in their home countries. In 2011-2012 our Rhymes and Stories DVD improved mean vocabulary scores for 459 kindergarten students living in poverty from the 27th to 47th percentile in less than 9 months, and three years later on the statewide reading test our students scored in the highest of three ranges 35% more often than their peers, and in the lowest range less than half as often (7.6% vs 16.13%). [1] hearatale.org website: We will highlight the hundreds of English rhymes, the 70 English language stories, and the dozens of stories translated and currently available in 15 languages, and will review teacher resources such as the 100+  ‘home experience’ exercises available in text and in children’s voices, and the classroom charts, and children’s diplomas. [2] Rhymes and Stories DVD: We will distribute free copies of our Rhymes and Stories DVD (50 stories, hundreds of rhymes with full audio, text, and illustrations) which participants may duplicate for free distribution to children.  The DVD’s child-friendly picture-cued tables of contents arranges stories from the shortest and linguistically simplest to the longer and more verbally complex. [3] Brainy Words 2000 app: The free Android app allows children to scroll down a virtually endless street and explore dozens of shops (toy, pet, tool, sports, clothing, etc.), and other locations (zoo, park, school, health center, home, beach, etc.) and click on pictures to hear and see text for more than 2000 words and quiz themselves to win virtual prizes. [4] Brainy Phonics app: The free Apple app includes alphabet letter/sound combinations with sample words and sentences for 92 distinct American-English sounds, for 92 basic ”sight” words, and features multiple quizzes to complete puzzle pictures.  [5] Rhyme A Zoo app: With this free Apple app children listen to and/or read 120 rhymes to answer 480 dialogic reading and phonics questions to build a private zoo and learn facts about 30 animals/creatures.

Rapporteurs at thworkshop:

  • BARBARA PALMER, Mount St. Mary’s University (USA)
  • NELSON PALMER, Hood College (USA)

Presentation: AELE Team

Language: English

Location: Aula 2401 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)


The purpose of our workshop is twofold: (1) to share our story of merging the notions of interdisciplinary instruction and disciplinary literacies in our work with secondary teachers and teacher educators, and (2) to demonstrate how teachers can design meaningful unit plans for adolescents that connect disciplines and apprentice students in the disciplinary literacies. Interdisciplinary instruction, which allows for a holistic study of a given concept or theme while providing students with authentic learning situations similar to those outside of school (Barton & Smith, 2000), is not a new idea. However, in the United States, interdisciplinary instruction has been inconsistently implemented through the years due to national policies. While the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 – 2015 changed the demands of teaching—emphasizing accountability, thus leaving the curriculum segmented, isolated and fact-focused (Garan, 2004; Goodman, 2006), the 2010 Common Core State Standards (CCSS) policy push for an interdisciplinary focus resurgence. Coupled with interdisciplinary instruction, CCSS also focuses on disciplinary literacies. That is, “students need to be mentored to read, write, and think in ways that are characteristic of discrete academic disciplines” (Buehl, 2011, p. 10). Moje (2013) shared, “When people have a greater hold over the disciplines, and know how knowledge is produced in it and participate in that, people become more adept at looking across the disciplines and actually starting to make connections across disciplines” (n.p.). We agree with Moje as we have seen teachers make meaning of disciplinary literacies, while learning how to plan conceptually within cross-discipline teams creating interdisciplinary units. In this workshop, we will guide discussion and share tips on: (1) Writing high interest and engaging interdisciplinary unit plans. (2) Integrating standards and other required content from the various disciplines. (3) Promoting student empowerment, disciplinary literacies, authentic assessments, and new/multiple literacies within an interdisciplinary unit plan. Additionally, we will include teacher testimonials that capture the power of their stories, and examples so participants can see these concepts and ideas in action. Our hope is that participants will receive a collection of new ideas from this session they can incorporate into their own classrooms/schools.

Rapporteurs at thworkshop:

  • CHARLOTTE FRAMBAUGH-KRITZER, University of Hawai’i at Manoa (USA)
  • ELIZABETH STOLLE, Grand Valley State University (USA)

Presentation: AELE Team

Language: English

Location: Aula 3201 (third floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)


The purpose of our workshop is twofold: (1) to share our story of merging the notions of interdisciplinary instruction and disciplinary literacies in our work with secondary teachers and teacher educators, and (2) to demonstrate how teachers can design meaningful unit plans for adolescents that connect disciplines and apprentice students in the disciplinary literacies. Interdisciplinary instruction, which allows for a holistic study of a given concept or theme while providing students with authentic learning situations similar to those outside of school (Barton & Smith, 2000), is not a new idea. However, in the United States, interdisciplinary instruction has been inconsistently implemented through the years due to national policies. While the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 – 2015 changed the demands of teaching—emphasizing accountability, thus leaving the curriculum segmented, isolated and fact-focused (Garan, 2004; Goodman, 2006), the 2010 Common Core State Standards (CCSS) policy push for an interdisciplinary focus resurgence. Coupled with interdisciplinary instruction, CCSS also focuses on disciplinary literacies. That is, “students need to be mentored to read, write, and think in ways that are characteristic of discrete academic disciplines” (Buehl, 2011, p. 10). Moje (2013) shared, “When people have a greater hold over the disciplines, and know how knowledge is produced in it and participate in that, people become more adept at looking across the disciplines and actually starting to make connections across disciplines” (n.p.). We agree with Moje as we have seen teachers make meaning of disciplinary literacies, while learning how to plan conceptually within cross-discipline teams creating interdisciplinary units. In this workshop, we will guide discussion and share tips on: (1) Writing high interest and engaging interdisciplinary unit plans. (2) Integrating standards and other required content from the various disciplines. (3) Promoting student empowerment, disciplinary literacies, authentic assessments, and new/multiple literacies within an interdisciplinary unit plan. Additionally, we will include teacher testimonials that capture the power of their stories, and examples so participants can see these concepts and ideas in action. Our hope is that participants will receive a collection of new ideas from this session they can incorporate into their own classrooms/schools.

Rapporteurs at thworkshop:

  • MONIKA KASTNER
  • IRENE CENNAMO
  • RICARDA MOTSCHILNIG

Alpen-Adria-Universität Klagenfurt (AUSTRIA)

Presentation: AELE Team

Language: English

Location: Aula 3202 (third floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)


In this workshop, we will focus on participatory research approaches in Adult Learning and Education, based on the example of a participatory research project in adult literacy education. Belzer and Pickard (2015) emphasize in their paper on views of adult literacy learners in (U.S.-) research literature that “a Competent Comrade view suggests that learners can and should be integrally involved not only in classroom and program decisions but also in research and policy making”. This claim supports – corresponding to the figure as “competent comrade” – a participatory research approach and non-deficit oriented perspective on adult literacy learners. The research team of three Austrian literacy providers, adult literacy learners and researchers, supports this view on learners´ involvement in all aspects. The research will take place in a newly conceptualised course offer on the topic of “learning” and be jointly conducted (planning, data collection and analysis, dissemination of findings to all levels). The Austrian tradition towards empowerment and self-empowerment, towards critical and emancipatory approaches as well as towards life-deep and life-wide orientation in adult literacy education (Cennamo, Kastner & Schlögl, forthcoming) supports a participatory research approach. The utmost aim of participatory research processes is to enhance the knowledge of social realities and, in the best case, to initiate change (von Unger, 2014). Within the workshop, we will give an overview of our theoretical (Transformative Learning Theory [Mezirow 2006, 2009, Taylor & Cranton 2012, Zeuner 2014]), methodological and empirical framework and look at following questions: How can Adult Learning and Education and research in adult literacy make social and cultural empowerment (Freire, 2007) possible and a reality? Can transformation and change in individuals, societies, communities of practice and research be a result of participatory research? What kind of impact can participatory research as trigger for transformative learning (sensu Mezirow) have on all learners/researchers, learning environments and learning processes? Can participatory research serve as a resource for advancement in adult literacy education? Workshop participants are cordially invited to share their experiences with participatory research approaches in social and educational sciences, with (participatory) research methods and learning tools, as well as with theoretical and practical concepts in the field of adult literacy education. As a follow up, participants will receive information on how their input was incorporated in the project and its proceedings (if desired).

Rapporteurs at thworkshop:

  • LINDA SMETANA
  • DANA L. GRISHAM

California State University East Bay (USA)

Presentation: JOANA MONTES JUAREZ, docente (SPAIN)

Language: English

Location: Aula 1202 – computer room (first floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)


Effective vocabulary instruction for all students has gained importance over the past decade. Graves (2016) reminds us that vocabulary learning is of enormous significance, that we cannot teach all the words that must be learned, and that it is even more challenging when we teach students who come from varied backgrounds and languages (p. 4-5). Effective vocabulary instruction provides access to academic text for all students and technology is an effective tool for vocabulary learning, particularly when students are engaged in generative and active learning (Grisham & Smetana, 2011). Effective vocabulary instruction promotes a lively interest in words through student expression, playing with words, building on individual interests as well as curriculum needs, and emphasizing self-efficacy in word learning (Beck, McKeown, & Kucan, 2008; Graves & Watts-Taffy, 2008). Researchers conducted several studies designed to test the efficacy of three generative technology strategies for increasing the academic vocabulary of K-12 students. Each study built upon the one prior to refine the strategies. They were based upon the idea that technology should be generative in the sense that the children should create some authentic product from its use. Technology in the K-12 classroom is no longer optional; it is imperative that teachers know how to teach with it and students know how to learn with it (Tondeur, et al, 2011). Thus, teachers must be prepared to address content standards with useful technological tools. The workshop consists of two parts beginning with the presentation of research on the strategies and the increased emphasis on disciplinary literacy and academic vocabulary (Wolsey, Smetana & Grisham, 2015). Students who are more engaged with word learning and who make connections between words necessary to understand text make deeper conceptual learning (Castek, Dalton, & Grisham, 2012). Repeated encounters with words in various contexts and modalities, social interactions while learning new words, and meaningful generation of learning products (Coiro, Castek, Sekeres, & Guzniczak, 2014; Leu, Kinzer, Coiro, Castek, & Henry, 2013; Marzano, 2009) assist in vocabulary learning. Linking images and linguistic information in the brain aids such learning and retention (Sadoski & Paivio, 2007). In the second part of the workshop, participants are invited to learn to use the strategies themselves, so that they may use them and/or incorporate them into their instructional practice. Strategies include technology-rich versions of the Frayer model tweeting for vocabulary learning (V-Tweets) and Vocabulary Self-Selection Strategy Plus (VSS+) all of which are situated within the challenges of academic texts and the need for close reading. Participants are provided with 21st Century strategies that connect to and engage today’s diverse student population and provide access to content.

Rapporteur at thworkshop:

KEIZO ASANO, Nanzan University (JAPAN)

Presentation: AELE Team

Language: English

Location: Aula 3401 (third floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)


Readers Theatre (RT, hereafter) can be defined as 1) “a presentational performance based on principles and techniques of oral interpretation” (Adams, 2003, p. x); 2) a “rehearsed group presentation of a script that is read aloud rather than memorized” (Flynn, 2004, p. 360); and 3) an “integrated language arts event centering on the oral interpretation of literature” (Sloyer, 2003, p. 3). In other words, RT can be simply referred to as an open-book play, which lies somewhere between oral reading and drama. RT has been shown to be an effective instructional strategy in the fields of EFL, English, English literature, and teacher-training courses, (Athiemoolam, 2013; Groh, 2012; Krueger, 2015; Ng & Boucher-Yip, 2010; Sloyer, 2003; Tsou, 2011; Young & Rasinski, 2009). In addition, however, it carries the potential benefits of acquiring social skills and improving actual language usage. Teachers, practitioners, and researchers would most probably agree that RT in the EFL classroom can serve to increase learners’ “self-confidence, enjoyment, creativity, motivation” (Beaven & Alvarez, 2014, p. 2) as well as awareness of responsibility, sense of fulfilment, and the ability to experience empathy and inspiration. For several years, the presenter has applied RT with fruitful results to his college EFL classrooms in Japan. Typical Japanese EFL classrooms find learners reticent and very shy, and yet they need to be cooperative, fluent, and communicative. The workshop is based on the presenter’s such EFL teaching experiences as well as on his learning experiences from participating in the international RT workshops. The workshop will present four basic steps within the allotted time of 90 minutes: explanation, making RT scripts, practice, and performance. The first step will give the participants a very brief explanation about RT and its theoretical background. Then the making of RT scripts to be read out loud by groups will follow. The third step is used for staging RT performances and actual practice with the group readers. The fourth and final step is performance. The participants will be expected to read their own scripts aloud in front of the others. This step is followed by a wrap-up session. The projected steps are subject to change depending on the number of the participants. The workshop can accept up to 30 participants. Reading materials to be scripted and read out will be provided by the presenter. No experience in RT is required. Let’s have fun!

5.45 p.m. Coffee Break / Performance

C Parallel sessions (Wednesday, 5 July – from 6.15 p.m. to 7.15 p.m.): ORAL PRESENTATIONS / POSTERS

Location: Location: Aula 2531 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)

Presentation: AELE Team

Language: Spanish / Portuguese (it is indicated in each case)


E-assessment in Estonian language

Hellin Puksand, Tallinn University (ESTONIA)

Language: English

What is e-assessment? E-assessment is defined as the end-to-end electronic assessment processes where ICT is used for the presentation of assessment activity and the recording of responses, and includes the end-to-end assessment process from the perspective of learners, tutors, learning establishments, awarding bodies and regulators, and the general public (JISC 2006). E-assessment can be used any assessment-related activity, be that summative, formative or diagnostic (Jordan, 2013). Final examinations use formative assessment. The graduation from high school in Estonia requires the student passing the state exam in Estonian language. The exam of Estonian language is a written one and it consists of reading and writing parts. Estonian Ministry of education wants to change the format of the state exam in Estonian language, and use e-assessment instead of paper exam. The working group of the e-exam development began work in autumn 2015. The aim of this group is to work up new exam and find out the pros and cons of the new examination form. The working group will test the computer-based writing task in spring 2017. After completing writing test students and their teachers will fill questionnaire. This presentation will analyse the students’ and teachers’ answers what they think about the electronic examination, is the computer-based exam better or worse than writing exam to the paper.


Instruction and assessment in a writing classroom in a lower secondary school

Anna-Maija Norberg, Education administration (SWEDEN)

Language: English

This study aims to investigate instruction and assessment in Swedish as a first language during two writing units in lower secondary school. The classroom is explored as a literacy practice, based on the idea that reading and writing are always situated within specific social practices, and as an assessment practice, based on the idea that classroom assessment is an important part of the classroom atmosphere and helps students to form concepts of themselves as learners as well as of what is important to learn. Literacy practices are shown in literacy events, and assessment practices are shown in assessment events. Assessment is understood both as instruction embedded and connected to grading. The answers to the research questions contribute in giving a description of the predominant writing discourse. They also provide a basis for an overall comparison of what is emphasized in instruction and in assessment respectively. This comparison also sheds light on the alignment between classroom instruction and assessment. Data were collected from multiple sources: video and audio recordings of twenty lessons, material based “observiews“ (the teacher is observed assessing students’ final texts aloud), students’ assessment rubrics, and the teacher’s lesson material. My main findings suggest that, at a global level, there is an agreement between instruction, formative assessment and summative assessment in the studied practice. However, a contradiction between tradition and change, and between different discourses, can be seen in assessment of texts. My findings contribute to research on writing instruction and assessment in lower secondary school. Teachers need to consider alignment between instruction, formative assessment and summative assessment, so that the knowledge asked for in instruction is stressed in assessment as well.


Changing literacy standards: Are we communicating effectively?

Marie Ernestová, University of South Bohemia (CZECH REPUBLIC)

Language: English

Even though the English language is well equipped to express very precise meaning, with numerous near-synonyms and subtleties of expression, nowadays many people are not using the language even close to capacity. Looser grammar is introducing ambiguities, precise words are being replaced by descriptive phrases, nouns are being converted to verbs and adjectives, idioms and clichés abound, there is more need to rely on context to support vaguer descriptions, words with broad meanings are being used instead of more precise expressions, superlatives are grossly overused so that supplementary descriptors are needed now to convey information with precision. ‚Journalese‘ (the language of newspapers) displays many of the above characteristics. So much communication today appears to be encapsulated in a mere 140 characters, supplemented by emoticons and acronyms. With apparently diminished message clarity, and a concommitantly greater reliance on reader interpretation, does this imply a lowering of standards of literary skills – or simply the emergence of a new skill? The relatively recent liberalisation of both the spoken and the written word has developed along with the trend towards greater informality. As society becomes more egalitarian, so too does the language it uses, but some of the skills that are needed for effective communication may be being degraded. There are perhaps two ´forces´ conspiring to frustrate literacy goals: (a) informality, language simplification, youth cultural domains and the twitterification of communication, and (b) the rise, and apparent acceptance as the ´new formality´, of turgid and obfuscating, euphemism-laden business management-type jargon embedded in strange, verbless sentences, which is now well established in most disciplines, including the education sector. Both ´forces´ can obscure clarity of meaning, but for different reasons. The possible negative implications of these evolutionary trends in language should not be underestimated: in fact, they need to be taken into account in redefining literacy standards and goals, particularly in EFL programmes.


Using a Text Set of Award-Winning Literature to Teach STEM and Engineering Design           

Sara Delano, SDM Learning (USA) and Willian Bintz, Kent State University (USA)

Language: English

Across the world teachers are trying to prepare students to hold good-paying jobs in the workplace. Complicating this work, many of these jobs do not exist today, and so it is difficult for teachers to know just what to teach that would best prepare students in the future. What teachers do know is that many of these future jobs will require high levels of literacy and be in the STEM fields (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) where engineering design is an essential skill. Given this emphasis on literacy and STEM, this session will share a text set of high-quality and award-winning literature paired with research and classroom-based instructional strategies, both of which are intended to promote positive dispositions in literacy and STEM, increase reading comprehension, and develop student understanding of engineering design. A text set is a collection of high-quality and award-winning literature, primarily picture books but also including wordless, nonfiction, informational, hybrid texts as well as graphic novels, that is related in some way, e.g. topic, theme, or perspective. Instructional strategies may include paired text, tri-texts, and consensus boards. This text set will focus exclusively on STEM and engineering design, the problem solving process used to identify the best practical solution to a real world problem. These problems can be logistical (How do we plan the most effective rail schedule?) or more tangible (How do we build something which does what we need within our current constraints?). While we cannot predict what the future will be and therefore cannot know what specific problems students will face in their careers, we can develop the critical thinking skills and the important literacy processes which will make them successful problem-solvers. Our goal is to share literary resources about STEM that will help teachers and students be successful in an unknown future.

Location: Aula 2532 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)

Presentation: AELE Team

Language: Spanish


Leer y escribir con memes: configuración de identidades juveniles en la escuela

José Luis De Piero, INVELEC – CONICET – UNT (ARGENTINA)

Language: Spanish

El presente trabajo persigue dos objetivos. Por un lado, anclar los memes de internet como un código con elementos y reglas propias de relación entre dichos elementos; por otro lado, analizar las formas en la que estos memes se convierten en elementos adecuados para la generación de discursos reflexivos de las identidades juveniles de los sujetos que los practican. Para lograr esto, en primer lugar, realizamos un análisis faneroscópico de los memes de internet, tomando algunos casos significativos, siguiendo la propuesta de C. S. Peirce retomada por Vitale (2004). A partir de este análisis que nos permite definir los memes como un código con reglas propias, realizamos un análisis de casos de producciones discursivas montadas en sitios web donde estos memes se emplearon para reflejar identidades, colectividades, y para fortalecer un discurso marcado generacionalmente. Consideramos que los discursos a los que apelan los memes pueden ser circunscriptos al concepto de “ciberdiscurso juvenil” de Palazzo (2010), por ser nacidos dentro de culturas juveniles y por ser principalmente practicados por jóvenes que se identifican como tales. Además, este código permite una expresividad que supera algunas limitaciones de la sola palabra escrita y brinda a los jóvenes nuevas herramientas para su comunicación, siendo, como analizamos al finalizar el trabajo, una posibilidad diferente para el trabajo en el aula.


Historias de lectura de las mujeres en Eknakan, Yucatán, México

Analuci Ayora, Secretaría de Educación Pública (MEXICO)

Language: Spanish

Este trabajo describe las historias de lectura de algunas de las mujeres que participan en el proyecto denominado Tardes literarias en la comunidad de Eknakan, Yucatán, México. Y su propósito es reflexionar sobre cómo este escenario que en un primer momento tenía solo la intención de acercar a las madres de familia a los libros y la lectura se convirtió en la llave para el empoderamiento, la autogestión y la construcción de un enfoque de comunidad de aprendizaje.


La Biblioteca Pública un espacio activo para la memoria colectiva y la integración social

Carlos García-Romeral Pérez, Comunidad de Madrid. Bibliotecas Públicas (SPAIN)

Language: Spanish

En una sociedad donde se va imponiendo las realidades virtuales, que simulan un mundo paralelo al que estamos viviendo. La Biblioteca pública, en este nuevo modelo social, que se está imponiendo tiene que desarrollar líneas de trabajo y objetivos que permitan un lado conservar la memoria socio-cultural y por otro fomentar la integración socio-cultural. La Biblioteca Pública desarrolla una actividad constante de colaboración, no sólo con entidades educativas (Escuelas Infantiles, Colegios, Institutos, Fundaciones…) sino también con entidades socio-culturales –públicas y privadas– de la ciudad (distrito) donde se encuentra. Uno de sus objetivos es el de rescatar a través de “acciones culturales” la memoria cultural de los ciudadanos, para que pueda ser entendida y transmitida. Una de las actividades colectivas e integradoras que se realizó en la Biblioteca Pública de Vallecas, en el 2015, junto con entidades educativas y culturales del distrito fue el rescate activo de las canciones con las que dormíamos, entreteníamos, jugábamos… con los niños cuando son pequeños así con Nanas y arrullos. Poesía a la deriva visualizamos la experiencia literaria primigenia, en un acto colaborativo en el que participaron centros educativos, librerías, asociaciones poéticas, personas… etc. El otro objetivo de la Biblioteca Pública es la de potenciar la integración social y cultural” desde hace años pero sobre todo desde 2013 se realizan diferentes acciones para integrar en la vida de la biblioteca a los diferentes colectivos de “disminuidos psíquicos” del distrito del Puente de Vallecas. La biblioteca es un recurso socio-cultural activo en el que bibliotecario diseña acciones que permitan su integración y su desarrollo como personas.


15 años leyendo desde la sociedad civil Consejo Puebla de Lectura, A. C. México

Daniel Ramos García, Guadalupe López Hernández and Dolores Nieto Romero, Consejo Puebla de Lectura (MEXICO)

Language: Spanish

En México, la oferta regular y sostenida de actividades y espacios culturales es escasa. En el imaginario nacional, la lectura es una práctica escolar y los programas o proyectos de lectura se diluyen a lo largo del tiempo. Ante este panorama, la existencia y permanencia de una asociación civil que promueva la lectura se hace necesaria. Necesaria para demostrar que no es verdad que no hay lectores, sino que lo que no hay son oportunidades de acceso a la cultura escrita; necesaria para mostrar que en materia de lectura la constancia es fundamental; que la lectura no es sólo decodificar grafías o extraer información; que sin el lector las bibliotecas y los libros no tienen razón de ser; que es preciso ofrecer textos diversos y de calidad; y que no existe una sola forma de leer o un solo tipo de lector. En 2001 se funda el Consejo Puebla de Lectura, A. C., (www.consejopuebladelectura.org), organización de la sociedad civil cuya misión es promover encuentros entre personas y libros, oportunidades de convivencia con la palabra escrita, oportunidades a las que todos deberían tener acceso, pues “tal vez no haya nada peor que estar privado de las palabras para darle sentido a lo que uno vive. Y nada peor que la humillación, en el mundo actual, de quedarse fuera del mundo del lenguaje escrito” (Petit, 1999). Esta ponencia cuenta la experiencia de esta asociación, cuyo comienzo tuvo un tinte más académico y a lo largo de los años ha ampliado sus ejes de acción, que van desde la organización de congresos para discutir sobre prácticas de lectura, hasta la lectura en voz alta para bebés.

Location: Aula 2533 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)

Presentation: TAMARA MORATO MORATILLA

Language: French / English (it is indicated in each case)


Comparaison des compétences en orthographe lexicale française entre les enfants issus de milieux plurilingues et ceux de milieux francophones

Sandrine Théroux-Morin, Brigitte Stanké and Stefano Rezzonico, Université de Montréal (CANADA)

Language: French

Le Québec comme plusieurs pays européens accueillent un nombre croissant d’immigrants de cultures et de langues de plus en plus diversifiées. Toutefois, il existe peu d’études documentant les besoins des élèves issus de l’immigration sur le plan scolaire. Étant donné que le langage écrit joue un rôle central dans la scolarisation, l’objectif de cette recherche est de comparer les compétences en orthographe lexicale des enfants de la 3e à la 6e année des écoles primaires plurilingues et des écoles majoritairement francophones. Pour ce faire, les compétences en orthographe lexicale de 276 enfants ont fait l’objet de trois analyses en fonction de leur environnement linguistique: le nombre de mots correctement orthographiés, le nombre d’erreurs par mot et le type d’erreur produit. Aucune différence significative n’a été observée entre les nombres de mots correctement orthographiés des élèves des écoles plurilingues et des écoles majoritairement francophones ni sur le plan du nombre d’erreurs par mot. Toutefois, une différence significative apparait selon les types d’erreurs en fonction de l’environnement linguistique. En effet, les enfants des milieux majoritairement francophones commettent plus d’erreurs d’homophones lexicaux tandis que les enfants issus des milieux plurilingues présentent plus d’erreurs phonologiques.


Teaching reading literacy practices in grade 4: what is different in English-speaking and French-speaking education systems?    

Dominique Lafontaine, Patricia Schillings and Virginie Dupont, Université de Liège (BELGIUM)

Language: French / English

The IEA PIRLS (Progress in International Reading Literacy Study) study is a comparative large-scale study aimed at assessing pupils’ reading literacy at grade 4 (age 10). In addition to the cognitive test, data are collected from students, teachers, principals, and parents, covering a broad set of contextual variables. The present study used the data from the teachers’ questionnaires of PIRLS 2011, focusing on several aspects of teaching practices or opportunities-to-learn such as development of skills/competencies, type of material used, amount of time dedicated to reading, types of assessments used in reading. Two groups of countries have been compared – three English speaking countries (Ireland, Ontario, US) and three French-speaking countries (Belgium French, France and Québec). The rationale for choosing these two groups is 1) both English and French have a non-transparent spelling, meaning that a substantial amount of time during the first grades are dedicated to the acquisition of decoding/phonics 2) reading literacy teaching practices rely on different traditions – a more formal approach in the French tradition and a more functional one in the English tradition 3) the three English-speaking education systems selected performed significantly better than the French-speaking ones in PIRLS 2011. The results of the analyses confirm some interesting contrasted patterns in the different education systems compared, showing a diversity in reading literacy teaching practices that can inspire teachers and lead to an enhancement of reading literacy and to close the gap between low and high achievers in reading. The main differences observed are the following: length of reading material used, a consecutive vs progressive ordering of skills to be learned, and the amount of time dedicated to reading across different domains.


Validation d’un outil d’évaluation de la mémoire lexicale-orthographique auprès d’élèves du secondaire    

Brigitte Stanké, Université de Montréal (CANADA); Stefano Rezzonico and Alain Desrochers, Université d’Ottawa (CANADA)

Language: French

Parmi les facteurs les plus importants contribuant aux faibles compétences scolaires, on trouve les difficultés d’apprentissage du langage écrit (Grenier et al., 2008). Dans des systèmes d’écriture opaques, comme le français, pour apprendre à lire et à orthographier, les enfants nécessitent non seulement une bonne capacité de conscience phonologique, mais également de mémoire lexicale-orthographique (MLO, Stanké, 2009). La MLO est essentiel dans l’établissement du processus orthographique, car elle permet un accès rapide et global à l’orthographe des mots pour les lire et les orthographier dans la norme. Un outil évaluant cette capacité est disponible pour les élèves de la maternelle (5 ans), mais pas pour les élèves plus âgés. L’objectif de cette communication est de présenter la validation du test MLO auprès d’élèves du secondaire. L’épreuve consiste à rappeler à l’écrit l’orthographe une série de pseudomots appris à l’issue de trois essais. À la suite de chaque essai, l’élève est invité à produire l’orthographe de chacun des pseudomots, sous l’image correspondante. Après un délai de sept jours, il est à nouveau invité à orthographier de mémoire chacun des pseudomots étudiés. 241 élèves présentant un développement typique ont participé à cette validation. L’étude des compétences orthographiques de ces enfants à l’issue de chaque essai a permis de tracer des profils dynamiques des capacités d’apprentissage et mnésique. Ces profils ont été comparés à ceux de 78 élèves dyslexiques-dysorthographiques. Les élèves typiques présentent des profils mnésiques homogènes, mais une grande variabilité est observée chez leurs pairs. Cet outil montre une bonne sélectivité (87%), mais une spécificité modérée, corroborant l’existence de facteurs différents à l’origine des troubles du langage écrit. Le test permet d’établir une courbe d’apprentissage et d’identifier le ou les processus mnésiques pouvant être à l’origine des difficultés d’apprentissage du langage écrit, qui permettra de mieux répondre aux besoins spécifiques des élèves.

Location: Aula 2534 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)

Presentation: AELE Team

Language: English


Iconic Reading – Cracking ‘Language Barriers’ to Early Literacy

John Walters, independent researcher/author (AUSTRALIA)

Language: English

World research has consistently found that parents can play a powerful role in supporting their child’s literacy development. However, it also shows that parents often don’t engage fully in this process, with one of the limiting factors being the parent’s own level of literacy. The last 50 years have seen many attempts by governments and education systems to draw parents into a more active role. Programs such as Reach Out and Read (USA), Book Trust (UK), Reading Matters (Canada) and Let’s Read (Australia) have each had positive outcomes, but all have required the parent to be functionally literate. There is a clear need for a technique to support illiterate and semi-literate parents, along with parents who are literate in their ‘mother tongue’, but have limited skills in the language of their domicile country. This paper will look at the potential of Iconic Reading, a technique designed in Australia to support illiterate or semi-literate parents during read-aloud sessions with their children. Iconic reading does not require the parent to be functionally literate because it uses wordless books, imbedded with parent prompts, in the form of icons. The parent ‘tells’ the story from the book’s images while engaging the child in ‘rich’ conversation, in any language, by referring to the icons. With its ‘in-book’ support, this technique offers greater flexibility in situations of disadvantage, than methods that require sometimes expensive ‘digital’ or external support. Initial testing, in parent-child dyads, is extremely encouraging and will expand across a range of contexts and languages. The development team continues to test and modify the appearance of icons, along with their use in a range of home and educational settings. Note: The author acknowledges the valuable advice received from the University of Sydney and University of Wollongong.


The written language as a means to develop the oral language and the literacy in kindergarten classrooms attended by children of ages 2-3 years old         

Maria Kreza, University of Crete (GREECE)

Language: English

The last decades it is emphasized that it is important to propose to the children of the kindergarten classes a print-rich environment and activities that involve the written language, even when the children are very young. In France, children are often enrolled in kindergarten at the age of three. A ministerial circular of 2012 emphasizes the importance of promoting enrollment in school classes at the age of two, particularly in places where there are many families with low socio-economic status. This is seen as contributing to the decline of school inequalities observed in primary school. Following this circular new classes were created for children who were 2 years old. In this communication we will study how teachers in these classes use written language as a means for the development of knowledge and skills about oral and written language. We will rely on data collected in seven classes. We made observations in the classes and interviews with teachers of these classes. This is a qualitative research. In most classes of our sample, written language has an important place both in classroom space and in proposed activities. Teachers stress that it is important for children to be in contact with written language, but the emergence of literacy is not their primary goal. Written language mainly appears as a means to develop oral language (syntax, vocabulary, oral expression), but may also contribute to the development of some literacy knowledge and skills. The teachers of these classes consider that it is important for children to become familiar with many features of the written language, but also to love books, reading and to discover the pleasure of reading.


Towards an understanding of the relationship between schooling and situated social cognition

Maria de Fátima Cardoso Gomes, Vanessa Neves and Luciana Prazeres, Universidad Federal Minas Gerais (BRAZIL)

Language: English

In our work we have deepened our knowledge on concepts such as language, culture and situated social cognition from the points of view of the Cultural-Historical Psychology and the Ethnography in Education. Thus, we take into consideration what has already been produced in these fields by Vygotsky (1983/1997; 1934/1993 ; 1931/1996), Agar (1994/2002), Bakhtin (1931/1992; 1965/2010) and Green, Dixon, Zaharlic (2001/2005). This particular research aims to describe, analyze and interpret the relationships between these concepts considering real situations of social conversation and practices of students at the School of Education in Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (Brazil) and their adult family members who no longer attend Youth or Adult Education nor higher education. Some questions guided our study: What counts as intelligence? How do we appropriate the world? These questions lead to historical controversies among linguists, psychologists and anthropologists: Does language create reality? Does reality create language? Are they both created in social practices? In order to answer these questions we developed a methodological approach through Case Studies. And did interviews were analyzed through discourse analysis. So far, we have observed tensions among the most educated people and those less educated ones. We argue that the importance of teaching resides in the fact that it promotes self-instruction (Vygotsky, 1983/1995) and empowerment, i.e., it is not only about the acquisition of individual skills. Educational processes are human activities, which are taught through actual activities related to social practices work, or pleasure or religion, etc. in the case of adults. School practices, separated from the daily life of human activities, can make labor and the understanding of the world difficult for many people. We reckon this as one of the challenges of the twenty-first century.

Location: Aula 3201 (third floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)

Presentation: AELE Team

Language: English


The Imagery-Language Foundation: Teaching At-Risk Children to Read and Comprehend       

Angelica Benson, Lindamood-Bell Learning Processes (USA)

Language: English

Based on 30 years of instructional experience with nearly 35,000 at-risk readers, we know that the dual coding of imagery and language is a critical factor in language comprehension and word reading.  Imagery is a basic sensory-cognitive function connecting us to the language we hear and the print we read. There are two distinct types of imagery—symbol imagery and concept imagery—intrinsic to word reading, orthographic processing, and reading comprehension.This presentation examines the effect of imagery-based, sensory-cognitive instruction on word reading and comprehension in children with reading difficulties. A consistent, repeated finding is that students with reading difficulties have shown significant word reading and comprehension improvements with imagery-based sensory-cognitive instruction. These results are observed in an analysis of students’ pre-post data disaggregated by the United Kingdom, the United States, and Australia. Do these findings suggest the universality of imagery and its’ key role in word reading and comprehension? Do these same improvements hold true for students diagnosed with dyslexia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and autism spectrum disorders? Behavioral and neurological research further validates the imagery-language connection resulting in lasting effects on word attack, word recognition, comprehension and specific areas of brain function in at-risk readers, including students with dyslexia or autism spectrum disorders. Supported by Dual Coding Theory, key research findings, and 30 years of instructional experience, this session reveals that imagery is a primary sensory-cognitive power source that can be developed and brought to consciousness for reading independence in children, including struggling readers, and those previously diagnosed with dyslexia or autism spectrum disorder.


Reading aloud –basic need of children and most rewarding investment for parents

Simone C. Ehmig, Institute for Research on Reading and Media, German Reading Foundation (GERMANY)

Language: English

Studies show that 15.5% of adults in OECD member states have inadequate reading skills (PIAAC 2012). A large number of youngsters also have difficulty reading and writing (PIRLS 2011, PISA 2012 – new results forthcoming). Inadequate reading skills have far-reaching social and economic consequences. They indicate the pressing need for measures that promote language and reading competencies, measures that must begin as early in life as possible. Reading aloud and storytelling play a highly significant role early in life, and their impact depends heavily on the parent-child bond and how parents and children communicate. Systematic research conducted from 2011 to 2016 among children of different age groups and their parents underscore the significance of reading aloud for children’s individual development children. Adolescents who have been read aloud in their early years have a higher reading motivation, they read more often and more intensely than peers who do not have this experience. They are more successful in school – not only in language related subjects. Furthermore, children who are read aloud by their parents show a development of their personalities and social skills higher-than-average. They are especially found to act with compassion and sense of justice much more than children who lack the experience of reading aloud. Reading aloud does not only seem to be a perfect and most rewarding investment in children’s development. A recent survey among children aged 5 to 10 shows: Almost all children always love reading aloud (91 %). They appreciate their parents spending time with them, creating a comfortable and relaxing atmosphere – and they love to hear good stories. Reading aloud is identified as a basic need most children claim and their parents should comply with.The studies lead to the “proclamation” of a children’s right to be read aloud – at the same time an obligation for all parents to read aloud to every child every day, at least for 15 minutes!


Children’s attitudes toward being read to at home and at school

Susan Ledger and Margaret Kristin Merga, Murdoch University (AUSTRALIA)

Language: English

There is a wide body of research that supports the benefits of reading aloud for young children. Research suggests that reading aloud at home enhances the development of receptive language, as well as other reading and cognitive skills. In addition, when parents read aloud to their children, this provides a valuable opportunity for focused interaction, with reading subsequently situated as a valued social practice. It has also been contended that the experience of being read to in childhood has a protective effect against aliteracy in later life. Reading aloud offers benefits that extend beyond the period of reading skill acquisition, potential impacting on later attitudes toward reading and literacy. While the benefits of reading aloud are relatively well established, far less is known about children’s regularity of engagement in the practice, and children’s attitudes toward being read to. This paper reports on the findings from the 2016 mixed-methods Western Australian Study in Reading Aloud (WASRA), exploring children’s reading aloud experiences, as well as their attitudes toward being read to, both at home and at school. Children across the primary/elementary years of schooling at 7 Western Australian schools contributed a wealth of valuable insights the current practice of reading aloud at school and at home, including indication of whether the practice of reading aloud is curtailed at school and at home as students progress through the primary school years. There is a paucity of current research that identifies barriers to the practice of reading aloud at school and at home, and thus this research can potentially provide a crucial foundation for future intervention in this area.


Literacy Training, Parent Beliefs and Habits, and Children’s Print Motivation Among Low-income Families

Glenda Darlene García, Readability Center (PHILIPPINES) and Portia Padill, University of the Philippines (PHILIPPINES)

Language: English

To highlight the role of parents in the community as literacy models to their children, this study conducted a six-day literacy training. Consequently, it identified whether it caused any effect on their literacy beliefs and habits and whether these beliefs and habits have a relationship with their children’s print motivation. The training adapted the ORIM (Opportunities, Recognition, Interaction, and Modeling) framework and highlighted the use of environmental print. The participants were visited in their homes before, during, and twice after the training to observe the family’s home literacy environments and to interview the parents on their literacy beliefs and habits, and the children on their print motivation. To answer research question number 1, “What are the changes in the parent literacy beliefs and habits after the literacy training?”, the analysis done was two-fold. For the two sets of literacy beliefs, comparison of answers before and after the literacy training was done. For the literacy habits, comparison was also done for both the responses before and after the training, regarding the participants’ own literacy habits and their habits in relation to their children’s literacy development. To triangulate data regarding the parent literacy habits, interviews with their children and observations by the researcher were used to validate the self-report of the parents. To answer research question number 2, “How do parents’ literacy beliefs and habits relate to children’s print motivation?”, the interviews with the children before and after the training were analyzed. The results were checked against the interviews with their mothers before and after the training as well. Observations from the researcher during the home visits sought to validate the responses of the parents and children. From the conclusions made in the study, several recommendations were given to different stakeholders such as the parents, teachers, researchers, nongovernmental organizations and social workers, and the fields of early childhood education and reading education.

Location: Aula 3202 (third floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)

Presentation: THAYS  SOUZA VIEIRA, University Complutense of Madrid

Language: Spanish / Portuguese (it is indicated in each case)


O aprendizado da escrita numa prática letrada: concepções e saberes mobilizados entre as professoras e as crianças de 6 anos

Kely Cristina Nogueira Souto, Centro Pedagógico da Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (BRAZIL)

Language: Portuguese

Este estudo analisa situações de ensino e de aprendizagem desenvolvidas com crianças de 6 anos matriculadas nos anos iniciais do ensino fundamental de uma escola pública municipal de Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brasil. Pretendeu-se compreender que concepções e saberes são mobilizados pelas professoras junto às crianças que encontram-se em processo inicial da alfabetização. As situações apresentadas se sustentam num contexto e numa prática pedagógica que acontece na perspectiva da alfabetização com letramento e revela a sala de aula como um ambiente alfabetizador. A abordagem de análise considera os estudos de Soares (1988), entre outros, no que diz respeito à alfabetização e ao letramento e, à concepção de ambiente alfabetizador, enfatizada por Ferreiro (1986). A metodologia consistiu numa abordagem etnográfica utilizando-se recursos de entrevistas, observações, notas de campo, fotografias e filmagens envolvendo as professoras e as crianças. As questões centrais e as discussões realizadas permitiram compreender: Em que medida as estratégias de ensino da escrita se sustentam numa prática letrada? Que concepções de alfabetização e de letramento são evidenciadas na prática da sala de aula com crianças de 6 anos em processo de aprendizagem da escrita? Os resultados evidenciaram que as crianças vivenciaram oportunidades de interação com os diferentes gêneros discursivos que circulam na sociedade sendo estes expostos e trabalhados pelas professoras em sala de aula. As intervenções pedagógicas tinham como objetivos refletir sobre os usos e a função dos textos tendo como eixo central a apropriação do sistema de escrita pelas crianças. Os aprendizes recorriam à escrita formal afixada em cartazes e painéis da sala de aula, questionando e analisando como determinadas palavras são escritas, seus respectivos sons e letras, permitindo estabelecer diferentes reflexões sobre a língua utilizando-se de materiais escritos diversos.


Finalidad y uso de la escritura científica disciplinar: un recurso metacognitivo en las trayectorias formativas de científicos en México   

Rocío Brambila Limón, Rollin Kent Serna and Guadalupe Morales Mejia, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla (MEXICO)

Language: Spanish

Esta investigación presenta una contribución a la compleja problemática de la práctica de la escritura científica disciplinar porque muestra aprendizajes que resultan del trabajo colaborativo para la construcción colectiva de artículos de electrónicos (cfr. Carrasco y Kent, 2011). El objetivo es mostrar la finalidad y uso de la escritura científica disciplinar como un recurso metacognitivo individual que se construye a partir de las exigencias disciplinares colectivas. La metodología utilizada en esta investigación es cualitativa desarrollada desde una doble perspectiva antropológica y sociológica. Tiene como base los datos recopilados a través de entrevistas a profundidad que dan cuenta de las trayectorias formativas de doctores en electrónica en México. Al analizar las descripciones del trabajo que aportan para producir artículos en coautoría (cfr. Bustos, 2009) cada participante de un grupo de investigación aporta pistas para mostrar cómo la práctica de la escritura académica disciplinar (cfr. Carlino, 2002) impacta directamente en una formación organizada del pensamiento (cfr. Lacon, y Ortega, 2008). Se propone entonces mostrar evidencias de escritura como recurso metacognitivo y se formulan algunas hipótesis sobre cómo estos procesos colectivos de planeación y desarrollo de un artículo les han permitido a los jóvenes científicos tomar conciencia sobre los procesos propios de la escritura. Al desarrollar y afinar sus prácticas comunicativas los participantes de un grupo sostienen redes colaborativas que les permiten como grupo la obtención de prestigio y reconocimiento disciplinar.


Literacidad: aprendizajes y saberes necesarios para la educación superior

Elsa María Fueyo Hernández, Verónica Macias Andere and Rocio Brambila Limón, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla (MEXICO)

Language: Spanish

¿Qué deben saber y qué deben saber hacer los estudiantes que egresan de la educación media superior para ingresar a la educación superior? ¿Qué deben saber hacer los estudiantes universitarios según las exigencias de instrumentos internacionales y según la realidad nacional? Dentro de las acciones de la CODAES-SEP (Comunidades digitales para el aprendizaje en educación superior), se encuentra la creación de marcos de referencia comunes entre México y Francia. Un grupo de especialistas convocados por la Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla (México), elabora marcos de referencia para el área del lenguaje, en particular saberes comunicativos. Los marcos ofrecen guías para atender a propósitos específicos en diferentes con de comunicación académica disciplinar en diferentes contextos. Nuestro marco de reflexión es la literacidad (Gee, 2005; Barton y Hamilton, 2004) y desde una perspectiva sociohistórica (Bazerman, 2016; Prior, 1998) buscamos entender qué hacen los estudiantes de nuevo ingreso a la universidad cuando leen o escriben para las disciplinas. Por lo tanto, buscamos entender prácticas situadas en un momento y un lugar específico para proponer estrategias de intervención. En la construcción de tales marcos, imaginamos un estudiante que, como plantea Carlino (2005), sea capaz de apropiarse del sistema conceptual-metodológico y de las prácticas discursivas de su campo, que tenga la habilidad de construir una red intertextual para crear un argumento propio, que pueda producir textos autónomos, dar consistencia al pensamiento propio, problematizar lo escrito pensando en el destinatario y poner en relación los contenidos con los problemas retóricos. Buscamos que, “como resultado de nuevas propuestas de trabajo, los alumnos recuperen protagonismo y tengan que desplegar mayor actividad intelectual que la implicada en escuchar al docente y leer la bibliografía una semana antes que el examen parcial”. (Carlino, 2005, p.12).


Escritura universitaria: ¿una habilidad transversal o disciplinar? Un acercamiento desde la semántica y los estudios cognitivos

Andrea Torres-Perdigón, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana (COLOMBIA)

Language: Spanish

La alfabetización en la universidad ha despertado el interés en Latinoamérica durante los últimos quince años. Con frecuencia, este interés de investigación se da a partir de la preocupación por la inclusión social y su relación con el acceso a la cultura escrita, aunque en otros casos se da por una intención pragmática que busca simplemente mejorar cualidades profesionales, de manera que los enfoques varían significativamente. Uno de los debates frecuentes con respecto a la enseñanza de la escritura universitaria en particular reside en dos concepciones, consideradas como contradictorias en algunos casos (Russell, 2013: 163): la primera supone que escribir es una habilidad básica y transversal; la segunda, que es una habilidad especializada y que pertenece a un campo disciplinar determinado (Carlino, 2013: 370). Frente a este debate, esta ponencia propone investigar dos áreas que se relacionan entre sí y que tienen que ver con la configuración del sentido: la semántica y los llamados estudios cognitivos. El propósito es explorar qué conceptos o herramientas teóricas provenientes de estas áreas pueden ser útiles para pensar cómo se produce el sentido, y cómo enseñar a producir textos en la universidad en medio de la conjunción -o disyunción- entre lo transversal y lo disciplinar. Se busca explorar el desarrollo reciente de la semántica y de los estudios cognitivos, en especial desde el vínculo que ha expuesto François Rastier al respecto, con el fin de aportar a la creación de nuevos métodos de enseñanza y aprendizaje de la diversidad de textos académicos que se producen en la universidad.

Location: ground floor, center aisle (Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)

Presentation: IRENE MARCOS GUERRA, University Complutense of Madrid

Language: English


School, literature and art: Contributions to the training of young readers

Ângela Balça and Paulo Costa, Universidades de Évora (PORTUGAL)

Language: English

Under the Educational Project for the Promotion of Books and Reading, the Municipality of Évora, Portugal, has launched a challenge to the schools of the 2nd and 3rd Cycles of Basic Education aiming to promote poetic text and a greater knowledge of one of the most highly regarded Portuguese language poets – Fernando Pessoa (1888-1935). This challenge consisted on several initiatives, including the competition Pessoa aos nossos olhos [Pessoa seen through our eyes]. This competition intended that students and teachers could approach the life and work of the poet, as well as to reinterpret the person’s profile, in a multidisciplinary work linking literature and visual arts. This initiative, of the responsibility of the Municipality of Évora, counted as partners the University of Évora and the bookstores of the city. The objectives of this competition were: to contact with the life and work of Fernando Pessoa; to reinterpret Fernando Pessoa’s profile in a plastic expression activity; to contribute to the formation of a literary reader; to promote the interrelationship between literary and artistic education. The methodology was based on a cooperative work which involved teachers and students and concerning both the life and literary work of Fernando Pessoa’s work and a plastic reinterpretation of the poet’s profile using wooden structures. The results of this competition indicate a very significant adhesion of schools to the proposed work, making visible the literary and plastic character of work developed by teachers and students. As conclusions, we stress the importance of such activities, not only for the motivation of teachers and students, but also for a more operative involvement in the work on poetic text and a productive relationship with plastic expression. The findings indicate an effective promotion of literary and artistic education of the youngest.


Improving the Fluency and Comprehension of Struggling 1st Grade Boys at the Intersection of Key Vocabularies and Readers Theatre

James Nageldinger, Literacy Education Elmira College

Language: English

Introduction: This presentation reports on a study that investigated an intervention of explicit prosody instruction at the intersection of elements of the Language Experience Approach (LEA), Reader’s Theater with six 1rst grade boys (median age 6 yrs) who struggled with reading. Concurrent with prosodic modeling , students generated individual key vocabularies, then collaborated to create, rehearse, and perform an original Readers Theater script for their classmates and parents. Rationale: Both the Language Experience Approach (LEA) and Readers Theater have been shown to be effective components of reading instruction. Language Experience is not new and has been in use since the early decades of the 20th century (Cremin, 1964; Cuban & Shipps, 2000; Kliebard, 2004; Smith, 2002) . Additionally, repeated reading has been shown to increase both oral fluency and comprehension (Dowhower, 1987; L. S. Fuchs, Fuchs, Hosp, & Jenkins, 2001; Samuels, 1979). Readers Theater is an effective means of incorporating repeated reading into the classroom (Griffith & Rasinski, 2004; Martinez, Roser, & Strcker, 1998-1999; Prescott, 2003) Besides being able to read accurately at the appropriate rate, fluent readers read with proper expression, or prosody. Recent studies have linked prosody with silent reading comprehension (Kentner, 2012; Kuhn, Schwanenflugel, Meisinger, Levy, & Rasinski, 2010; Wright, 2011) Struggling readers especially benefit from opportunities to read repeatedly and with proper expression Research Question: How would explicit prosody instruction utilizing the Language Experience Approach combined with Readers Theater impact reading fluency in struggling 1st grade students? Procedure: The researcher and a school intervention reading specialist met with six 1st graders for 30 minutes 4 days a week over a 7-week period. During this time each student presented the researchers daily with a key word that held personal significance. This word was transcribed onto card-stock for after-school rehearsal. As a individual key vocabularies were being created, expressive and non- expressive reading was modeled with an emphasis on explicit prosody instruction using Readers Theater scripts. After each student had six or seven key words, they were guided to use this personal key vocabulary to create their own stories in one or two sentences. The stories were transcribed and the students practiced reading their stories aloud with an emphasis on prosody. The next step was to combine all students’ words and create a collective story. From this longer story a Readers Theater script was created, rehearsed, and performed for their classmates and parents. Findings: Differences in pre- and posttest scores showed significant increases in both fluency and comprehension relative to comparable peers receiving standard intervention (phonics, word attack, and vocabulary). Implications: Reluctant Readers: Classrooms that employ elements of the Language Experience Approach, particularly key vocabularies, in conjunction with student created scripts have the potential to increase participation of struggling and reluctant readers. Fluency: Explicit prosody instruction that involves student-created materials and repeated reading in the form of Readers Theater can improve fluency development leading to an overall increase in reading achievement in early readers, particularly those who struggle.


Teaching Children to Write:  A Global Perspective

Jan Lacina, Texas Christian University (USA)

Language: English

This poster session will highlight a research study of literacy leaders worldwide. Writing is an important component of literacy. Best practices for writing have been noted in position papers from the National Council for Teachers of English (2016), Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL, 2010), and through a joint statement from the International Literacy Association and National Association for the Education of Young Children (1998); however, many of these reports focus on what is developmentally appropriate for the young child, and most also report on good writing instruction published primarily by U.S. researchers.   The purpose of this present research is to better understand literacy leaders’ views on the state of writing instruction globally for children ages 9-12. In this study, global literacy leaders were selected based on their affiliation as a leader within the International Literacy Association Affiliate Council. The International Literacy Association (ILA) is the largest literacy organization in the world. Literacy international leaders from each continent will be contacted to participate in this research study. As our world has become interconnected through the ease of travel and technology, more research studies, and practitioner articles, need to report on global literacy research on teaching writing.


Digital Writing in Elementary School: Comparative Study of the Effects of Two Writing Modes on Motivation and Writing Performance

Natalie Lavoie and Joane Deneault, University of Quebec (CANADA)

Language: English

Computers are increasingly used for classroom writing activities, both to improve writing skills and motivate pupils to write (Karsenti & al., 2005). Yet very few studies have compared the effects of using a keyboard versus pencil and paper at the elementary school level. Moreover, existing studies are dated and use different indicators of performance and motivation, inevitably leading to different conclusions. This study aimed to compare the effects of two writing modes, namely, using a keyboard versus using a pencil and paper, on the writing performance and motivation of children in elementary school. Pupils in Grades 2 (aged 7-8), 4 (aged 9-10) and 6 (aged 11-12) (N=255) were assigned various writing tasks under two conditions: using a keyboard and using a pencil and paper. Their writing performance was evaluated for each condition (lexical and grammatical spelling, writing speed, length and overall quality of texts) and they completed a questionnaire assessing their motivation to write (self-efficacy, interest, task-value). Results (t tests) show that, regardless of grade level, pupils were more interested in writing with a keyboard. However, they wrote faster and produced better quality texts when using a pencil and paper. When pupils were allowed to use a spell check program, only the lexical spelling scores of those in Grades 4 and 6 were higher when they used a keyboard versus pencil and paper. Overall, despite their better performance with a pencil and paper, these pupils were more motivated to write with a keyboard, although they attached greater value to writing with a pencil.


Pathways and Barriers for Building Communities of Writers in Schools

Kathleen QuinnPatricia Erickson and Eileen Baker, Holy Family University (USA)

Language: English

Our poster will share current literature, policies, and practices related to improvement of writing in primary/elementary schools (grades Kindergarten to 5 in the U.S.A.), from two suburban school districts in the U.S.A.   Various pathways that have assisted the development of establishing writing communities include extensive professional development, strong support from administration, literacy specialists at the building level, teacher choice in program selection, and consistency across grades.   Some barriers to building a community of writers include expense, teacher buy in, time for teachers to plan and implement the complexities of some programs, especially those that are not scripted, and the wide range of student writing ability and skills. Technology can be seen as both a pathway and a barrier and the way that technology is utilized will be examined. The poster will provide a comparison of each aspect of the pathways and barriers that are noted for each school district for two grade levels at each school. One district is using a traditional, anthology-based writing program and the other is using a Writer’s Workshop approach. Specific examples of assessments and student work will also be included.


The Comparison Between Texts Written by 5th Graders on Computer and by Hand

Anne Uusen and Jane Pugi, Tallinn University (ESTONIA)

Language: English

Estonia is known as highly developed e-country. Estonian Statistical Office claims that in 2012 95% of families with children had computers. The access to the Internet has increased even more: in 2013 hundred percent of all educational institutions had computers and Internet connection (Eesti Statistikaamet, 2013). Children spend their time on computer activities about 83 minutes per day and this number does not include time spent by playing games. There is written also in national curriculum that school must guarantee the skill of using computer for writing different texts and as tool of communication. Different authors have found that using computers for writing has certain advantages. Students are more motivated, they make less errors, produce longer text, show more positive attitudes etc. (Daiute, 1986; Jones & Pellegrini, 1996; Peterson, 1993). Despite of this most of the texts written in mother tongue lessons are still written by hand. That’s way the study was carried out in four schools in Estonia. The aim of the study was to find out the effect that writing on computer has on a text in comparison with writing by hand. In two of the schools the students wrote the texts on computer and in two by hand. The students were given a writing assignment according to which they had to write a text of 150 words during one Estonian lesson on a given topic. Altogether 73 texts were produced and compared. The study showed that overall the students are well capable of writing on computer. The texts written on computer had higher scores in terms of text length, expert’s opinion and the number of sentences. Similar results were achieved with both ways of writing in terms of lexical diversity indicators and sentence length. The texts written on computer were poorer in terms of lexical richness and density.

THURSDAY, 6 JULY

Location: Faculty of Education – University Complutense of Madrid

C Parallel sessions (Thursday, 6 July – from 9.00 a.m. to 10.45 a.m.): ROUND TABLES / SYMPOSIUMS

Discussants:

  • JON CALLOW, University of Sydney (AUSTRALIA)
  • SARA (SALLY) ANN BEACH, University of Oklahoma (USA)
  • ANNE BURKE, Memorial University of Newfoundland (CANADA)
  • ANGELA WARD, University of Saskatchewan (CANADA)

Symposium Chair: JON CALLOW, University of Sydney (AUSTRALIA)

Presentation: MARIJN BROUCKAERT, Dutch-speaking public library of the City of Brussels (BELGIUM)

Language:

Location: Aula 2531 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)


Douglas Kaufman argues that “if I want my students to become passionately literate people, I, too, must be a passionate, literate person, who reads, writes, and learns in front of them” (Kaufman, 2002). But how does a teacher become a passionate literate person? What experiences work to form this literate identity? As part of researching the forms and practices that build concepts of engaged literacy learning, the area of literate identity emerged as an important part of our research puzzle.  Drawing on Bourdieu’s work around habitus,  Gennrich and Janks argue that “habitus then structures our actions and our dispositions, including our involvement with and dispositions towards literacy” (Gennrich & Janks, 2013) p.458. While engaged literacy learning involves behavioural, intellectual and emotional dimensions, as well as motivational aspects (Fredricks et al., 2011; Martin, 2002), there is a recognition of the  agentic or active role for students as they develop a literate identity (Reeve & Tseng, 2011). At the same time, teachers, with their own literate identities, are recognised as playing a key role in engaging students in literacy learning (McCaslin, 2009). Working across 5 countries and six locales, including Australia, Canada (British Columbia and Newfoundland), Romania, Slovakia & the USA, data from the project explored the broader question of how teachers recognize and describe the literacy engagement of their students. As part of the interview process with 33 teachers, who taught from kindergarten (4-5 year olds) to high school (Grade 12), the question of their own literate identity was explored. The symposium will begin with a short introduction contextualizing the presentations with a summary of the wider findings of the project. Each presenter will then address data from a specific country, including a brief snapshot of the literary and cultural ‘landscape’ for each nation. The symposium will conclude with time for questions and discussion.

Sara Ann Beach

Language: English

Choosing to read on the Plains—Teachers in Oklahoma describe their reading experiences as children built around the choice of what to read, a practice that carries over into their own classrooms. As teachers, their literacy practices revolve around reading and writing about professional topics and social media for pleasure and learning.

Dracula’s sisters feed on books – Romanian educators share their experiences as literacy learners, and reflect on their practices of shaping their students’ engagement in literacy learning by inviting them to read and write with an inquisitive mind, thinking and making connections beyond the text.

Anne Burke

Language: English

“Owning it” : Disney Records, Catalogues, Album Covers and Irish Laments.  Teachers reading and writing histories in Newfoundland show vast and varied experiences with texts that frame their early literacy engagements. In this paper, teachers multimodal maps of personal literacy engagements will be shared alongside their reflective thoughts on their current classroom  practices.

Jon Callow

Language: English

Twitter to the Man Booker Prize – Australian teachers report reading widely as children.  As adults their literate lives are mixed with social media, children’s literature and contemporary novels, some of which is entwined in their classroom practice.

Angela Ward

Language: English

– Engaged readers under snow-capped peaks– Canadian teachers in British Columbia develop strong teaching identities, with teaching experience across various subject areas.  As keen readers themselves, they demonstrate thoughtful insight into their own teaching practices

– “But why do I need to know this?” – Teachers in Slovakia describe their personal transformations from traditional teacher centered instruction to developing innovative and practice focused literacy activities that take into account real world applications. They discuss the importance of noticing students’ natural curiosity, engaging reading materials, and for the engaging activities to make sense in the world beyond the classroom.

Discussants:

  • WILLIAM BROZO, George Mason University (USA)
  • SARI SULKUNEN, University of Jyväskylä (FINLAND)
  • CHRISTINE GARBE, University of Cologne (GERMANY)
  • PATRICIA SHILLINGS, University of Liège (BELGIUM)

Symposium Chair: WILLIAM G. BROZO

Presentation: ELENA BERMEJO GONZÁLEZ, University Complutense of Madrid

Language: English

Location: Aula 2533 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)


This symposium session is concerned with the growing interest in many countries of a relatively new line inquiry referred to as disciplinary literacy. For the past several decades, content area literacy, which is concerned with reading and writing strategies applied to topics and texts across the curriculum, has dominated the research and practical literature and has been reflected in national curricula, as well. Recent developments in literacy theory and policy, however, have brought about a new and more nuanced understanding of what it means to possess sophisticated literacies for disciplinary texts and disciplinary discourse communities in science, history, literature, maths, and the other knowledge domains. While content area literacy focuses on skills and strategies that are generalizable across disciplinary boundaries and subject area domains (Brozo et al., 2013), disciplinary literacy is concerned with the unique languaging and literacy practices within each subject area (Gillis, 2014; Shanahan, Shanahan, & Misischia, 2011). As calls for better preparing youth for the demands of learning in the 21st century increase, it is essential that we consider how these perspectives and approaches impact the literacies and identities of adolescents. The presenters will first identify and discuss important historical developments that have given rise to disciplinary literacy, such as evolving theories of language use and literacy. This will also include an exploration of the enduring legacy of content area literacy. Next, the label itself or the concept of a “discipline” is critiqued by attempting to answer such questions as: What is a discipline? What are the disciplinary boundaries in primary and secondary school? How is a discipline similar to or different from a content area or subject? This is followed by a comparative analysis of research and practice, including trends in teacher professional development, related to disciplinary literacy in European and North American contexts. The session concludes with an invitation to the participants to share their experiences with disciplinary literacy, comment on the presenters’ remarks, and ask questions. The symposium includes the following presentations:

An Historical Context for Disciplinary Literacy from North America

William G. Brozo (USA)

William Brozo will introduce and chair the session. He will provide an historical context for disciplinary literacy, explore what is meant by a “discipline,” and describe and analyze theoretical, research, and practical developments in disciplinary literacy in North America.

 

Disciplinary Literacy in the Nordic Curricula and Research

Sari Sulkunen (FINLAND)

Sari Sulkunen will describe and analyze theoretical, research, and practical curriculum-related developments in disciplinary literacy in the Nordic countries, foregrounding common and unique features relative to the North American context. She will illustrate the wider developments by focusing on the discipline of history in the Finnish educational context.

 

Content and Disciplinary Literacy Practices in European Professional Development

Christine Garbe (GERMANY)

Christine Garbe will explain how aspects of content area literacy and disciplinary literacy apply to BaCuLit, ISIT, ELINET, and BleTeach, projects she has directed across Europe, involving literacy curriculum development, literacy policy, and teacher professional development.

 

The Intermediate Discourses Approach as a tool for Disciplinary Literacy

Patricia Schillings (BELGIUM)

Patricia Schillings will provide a description of the French intermediate discourses approach and explain its implications for disciplinary literacy teaching practices. She will describe how this reflexive dimension of oral and written language is connected to students building knowledge in school content subjects such as sciences.

Discussants:

  • EITHNE KENNEDY
  • NORMA McELLIGOTT
  • ROISÍN O’SHEA
  • GERRY SHIEL

Institute of Education, Dublin City University-St Patrick’s Campus (IRLAND)

Symposium Chair: GERRY SHIEL

Presentation: PLÁCIDO BAZO MARTÍNEZ, Universidad de La Laguna (SPAIN)

Language: English

Location: Aula 2534 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)


Write to Read is a school- and community-based professional development model that enables teachers and community educators to deliver high-quality literacy programmes for children. The Project adopts an evidence-based, holistic approach to literacy issues. It collaborates with schools and communities to meet the literacy needs of children in customised ways that build their motivation, engagement, agency, creativity and higher-order thinking skills as well as performance on assessments of reading and writing. Rather than propose a specific programme or intervention, the Project seeks to support schools in investigating context-specific solutions to underachievement in the context of a Balanced Literacy Framework (BLF) (e.g., Kennedy, 2014; Pressley, 2006). The Project currently involves 14 primary schools in Dublin city and over 1600 pupils in pre-kindergarten to Sixth grade. Most of the schools have a mixed population with many children for whom English is an Additional Language (EAL) and children from the Travelling Community. The schools report low levels of parental involvement. Some experience problems with attendance and pupil engagement in literacy. The Project’s vision is for a whole school, whole community approach to literacy where expectations will be raised, parents will be empowered and children will be supported and encouraged to develop reading and writing as lifelong habits. While Write to Read was developed and is being implemented in Ireland, many of the challenges that the Project seeks to address can be found in other European countries, including, for example, varying levels of home support for literacy, differences among teachers in their approaches to addressing literacy difficulties, and varying levels of interest, motivation and engagement among children. The symposium comprises: (A) An introduction to the BLF underpinning Write to Read, including the underlying philosophy and theoretical perspective and the key approaches to teaching, learning and assessment. This will show how the Project seeks to support schools in closing the performance gap between high-poverty and other schools. (Presenter: Eithne Kennedy). (B) A review of the role of professional development in Write to Read, and how Project mentors work with teachers in their schools to evaluate their current practice, and to explore possible changes, with reference the BLF. Aspects of the mentors’ role in supporting teachers to design and implement mini-research projects in their classrooms will be explained. Interview data with teachers will be used to illustrate successes and challenges. (Presenter: Norma McElligott). (C) A description of the Write to Read approach to developing children’s response to text via dialogical discussion involving pupils and teachers. Qualitative data illustrating interactions between teachers and pupils and how these change over time will be presented. Short video segments of students discussing specific texts will be shown. (Presenter: Roisín O’Shea). (D) An analysis of teachers’ perspectives on the effectiveness of professional development in Write to Read and how it impacts on their planning and practices relating to instruction and assessment. This includes Write to Read’s use of an inquiry-based approach to teacher development, and the establishment of communities of practice across schools. Evidence for the effects of these activities on teachers’ self-efficacy and identity will be provided. (Presenter: Gerry Shiel)

Discussants:

  • MARÍA DOLORES PÉREZ MURILLO
  • IRENE SOLBES CANALES
  • GABRIEL RUSINEK
  • NOEMÍ ÁVILA VALDÉS
  • MARÍA JOSÉ CAMACHO MIÑANO
  • MAGDALENA CUSTODIO ESPINAR

 Universidad Complutense de Madrid (SPAIN)

Roundtable Chair: MARÍA DOLORES PÉREZ MURILLO

Presentation: TAMARA ALÍA PRIETO, Spanish Reading and Writing Association

Language: Spanish

Location: Sala de Grados (third floor, main entrance, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)


En esta mesa redonda presentaremos distintas acciones que forman parte de un proyecto interdepartamental de innovación docente que se viene desarrollando en la Facultad de Educación (UCM) en los tres últimos años. El proyecto persigue un doble objetivo: fomentar la colaboración entre profesores/as que imparten docencia en lengua inglesa en el Grado de Maestro, y formar al futuro profesor/a en el enfoque AICLE (Aprendizaje Integrado de Contenidos y Lengua Extranjera), a fin de que diseñen y pongan en práctica actividades interdisciplinares con apoyo de las TIC.

 

Discussants:

  • ANDRÉ C. MOREAU, Université du Québec, Outaouais (CANADA)
  • NANCY GRANGER, Université du Québec, Trois-Rivières (CANADA)
  • LAURE MINASSIAN, Université de Caen (FRANCE)
  • MYRIAM FONTAINE, Université du Québec, Montréal (CANADA)
  • FANNIE L´ABBÉ, Université du Québec, Outaouais (CANADA)
  • MELANIE DUTEMPLE, Université du Québec, Outaouais (CANADA)
  • MAGALI JEANNIN, University of Caen-Normandy, ESPE (FRANCE)

 Symposium Chair: NANCY GRANGER

Presentation: TAMARA MORATO MORATILLO (SPAIN)

Language: French

Location: ROOM 2531


In the spirit of working together, it is important to remember that the concept of literacy has been understood in various ways, first as reading and writing skills (Pierre, 1994; Hébert and Lépine, 2012). Continued research led to the inclusion of other skills, specifically the ability to communicate (Lafontaine and Pharand, 2015). This new definition of literacy is in keeping with a conceptualization of literacy that goes beyond the written word (reading and writing) and opens the door to a variety of communication practices (uses) and new research-based knowledge. In this symposium, research teams, students, and practitioners will inventory the effects of literacy on people from different groups and within environments or communities. Two questions will guide the discussion: a) how does a more refined understanding of literacy influence research choices, and b) how is this research or methodology reflected in theory and practice. This symposium will consist of three sessions, each an hour and three quarters in length: a) Session 1 – Literacy: theoretical and methodological contributions; b) Session 2 – Literacy: research results, and c) Literacy and inclusion.

Discussants:

  • MARÍA LAURA DEL CARMEN DÍAZ RIVERA
  • LAURA ANGÉLICA ISSA VILLA
  • ROLLIN L. KENT SERNA

Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla (MEXICO)

Roundtable Chair: ROLLIN L. KENT SERNA

Presentation: ARACELI MARTÍNEZ ARROYO, Universidad Iberoamericana (MÉXICO)

Language: Spanish

Location: ROOM 2532


El desarrollo de la lengua escrita como parte de un proceso de enculturación académica, (Laudel y Glâser, 2008, Ivani, 1988) exige realizar tareas de expresión oral, de lectura sistemática de autores y de escritura de distintos géneros textuales. El propósito del presente trabajo consiste en documentar la manera en que han tenido lugar esas tareas en del marco de acompañamiento de jóvenes en formación, 18 estudiantes de cinco generaciones de maestría que eligieron formarse como investigadores y participar de las actividades cotidianas de un grupo de investigación sobre los procesos institucionales para formara científicos en México (Kent, 205, 2014; Carrasco y Kent, 2011). Durante 10 años el acompañamiento ha sido concebido como una intervención pedagógica planeada para formarles como autores disciplinarios. Consiste en: a) sesiones generales de reflexión acerca de los contenidos y perspectiva de análisis que desarrolla el grupo de investigación en cuestión, b) tareas de lectura sistemática y la discusión de sus productos,  c)  participación en foros académicos y en foros internos de avances de investigación y –obviamente- d) la producción de textos académicos intermedios, a los que denominaremos “productos intermedios” y e) la publicación de trabajos de investigación como ponencias en extenso en memorias de congreso y artículos publicados en revistas disciplinarias arbitradas. Este trabajo sigue orientaciones y pistas de la formación disciplinar y da cuenta de criterios de organización, estrategias de participación y desarrollo de las sesiones del grupo de investigación. Ofrece asimismo una descripción de distintas versiones de productos escritos para evidenciar logros de aprendizaje que muestran los estudiantes-autores. Los resultados sugieren que el cuidado integral de los aspectos mencionados asegura producir el documento esperado, la tesis de maestría. Este trabajo formula como recomendación la siguiente hipótesis: producir un texto completo con una salida pública, oral o escrita, permite al estudiante reconocerse como autor y asegura la conclusión del producto recepcional.

10.45 a.m. Coffee Break / Performance

C Parallel sessions (Thursday, 6 July – from 11.15 a.m. to 12.30 p.m.): ORAL PRESENTATIONS / POSTERS

Location: Aula 2531 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)

Presentation: AELE Team

Language: Spanish


Lectura y Escritura Académica en la Universidad EAN     

Yasmín Galvis Ardila, Universidad EAN (Colombia)

Language: Spanish

En Colombia como lo asegura González (2013 p.p 196) se han venido adelantando programas, estrategias e investigaciones entorno a la lectura y escritura universitaria de manera inconsciente desde hace más de 25 años. Solo en la última década se han realizado acciones de investigación y práctica consciente frente a la alfabetización académica, para ello se han tenido en cuenta conceptos como los propuestos por Carlino (2013) en donde afirma que:“(…) alfabetizar académicamente equivale a ayudar a participar en prácticas discursivas contextualizadas, lo cual es distinto de hacer ejercitar habilidades que las fragmentan y desvirtúan. Porque depende de cada disciplina y porque implica una formación prolongada, no puede lograrse desde una única asignatura ni en un solo ciclo educativo. Así, las “alfabetizaciones académicas” incumben a todos los docentes a lo ancho y largo de la universidad.” (p.p 370). En 2015, un grupo de investigación de la Universidad EAN de Bogotá, Colombia, propuso un proyecto que pretendía integrar el concepto de alfabetización académica en un solo programa de lectura y escritura. En 2016, se está llevando a cabo la segunda fase, que contempla dos estrategias: la primera se articula desde la visión transversal de la escritura que se enfoca en el fortalecimiento de la redacción; la segunda, desde la concepción disciplinar para leer y escribir en cada disciplina. Esta comunicación presentará los resultados de la primera estrategia  que consiste en la creación de un Centro de Lectura y Escritura Académica ‘CLEA’, para ello se contó con estudiantes monitores del programa de Lenguas Modernas, quienes fueron formados para dar tutorías en redacción y escritura académica para los estudiantes de pregrado. Se diseñaron los instrumentos de recolección de datos para las tutorías, las sesiones de formación de tutores y las reuniones de acompañamiento y de cierre de cada semestre, al igual que se sistematizaron las experiencias para seguir direccionando el CLEA.


Diagnóstico de comprensión lectora de textos académicos con alumnos universitarios de Puebla, México

Gerardo Garibay Garduño and Yanet Gomez Bonilla, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla (MEXICO)

Language: Spanish

Se ha observado de manera empírica que los estudiantes universitarios de primer y segundo semestre tienen dificultades para comprender los textos específicos de la disciplina que estudian, debido a esto, se realiza la presente investigación cuyo objetivo general es la elaboración de un diagnóstico de comprensión lectora de textos académicos con alumnos universitarios en la ciudad de Puebla, México. En la primera etapa del estudio se realizó una revisión bibliográfica que permitiera definir los conceptos relevantes de la propuesta de estudio tales como Lectura, Comprensión Lectora y Niveles de Comprensión; de igual forma, se revisaron las propuestas de Daniel Cassany, así como de Paula Carlino como propuestas actuales de comprensión lectora en contextos formales. La segunda etapa consta de una investigación de campo que por sus características formalmente se denomina como cuantitativa, no experimental de tipo transversal, exploratoria y descriptiva. Se seleccionó una muestra no probabilística que consta de 40 sujetos repartidos en dos grupos a los cuales se les suministró un cuestionario que contenía una lectura y 20 preguntas cerradas con respuestas de opción múltiple, el cual se aplicó de manera autoadministrada grupal. El diagnóstico muestra que los sujetos de investigación tienen serias dificultades en el nivel Literal, no logran acceder al léxico de su disciplina y se les dificulta el análisis sintáctico del texto que se les presentó. En cuanto al nivel Inferencial, es decir, los de mayor complejidad, el estudiante logra, con medianas dificultades, realizar inferencias y construir nuevos aprendizajes con el texto leído. Estos resultados sirven de punto de partida para la elaboración de una posible estrategia de intervención de comprensión lectora para universitarios que facilite el acceso a su disciplina y, por ende, mejore su preparación universitaria.


Leer más allá de las líneas: procesos de lectura en tiempos digitales

Mónica María Márquez Hermosillo and Jaime Ricardo Valenzuela González, Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Occidente (MEXICO)

Language: Spanish

Las tecnologías de la información y la comunicación (TIC) han transformado las prácticas lectoras. La lectura ahora se muestra como una conjunción de procesos diversificados y complejos, en donde se alternan soportes, contenidos, prácticas e interlocutores, que implican un acercamiento global, plural, identificado como la perspectiva de la literacidad. Enmarcada en las teorías socioculturales, la literacidad concibe la lectura como una práctica social, situada histórica y culturalmente. Tomando como base el Modelo Ideológico de Literacidad, de Street (1984, 1993, 2008) y Cassany (1990, 2006, 2011, 2012), se realizó una investigación de campo cuyo objetivo fue identificar, describir y analizar los procesos y prácticas de lectura –especialmente la lectura no obligatoria, sino lectura por placer–, en dispositivos electrónicos móviles (tabletas, celulares, lectores electrónicos, lap tops), así como las representaciones que involucran. El enfoque metodológico fue mixto: un estudio cuantitativo exploratorio con una muestra de 400 lectores, más un estudio cualitativo descriptivo, secuencial y relacional, que trabajó con un grupo focal. Se presentan los resultados relacionados con las habilidades técnicas, estratégicas, cognitivas y sociales que confluyen en la lectura así como los diversos niveles y dimensiones que de ello emergen. En los hallazgos de la investigación se plantea la lectura como una práctica ampliada, colectiva, tejida en red, que va más allá de las líneas. Se visualizan algunas vías de reflexión y de acción para el impulso de la literacidad, aplicables tanto en el ámbito escolarizado como en el no escolarizado, con diversos grupos de edades.


Narrativa transmedia 

María Teresa Giménez, Instituto de Educación Secundaria “Miguel Servent”, Zaragoza (SPAIN)

Language: Spanish

Empezaré por decir que las narrativas transmedia me parecen muy interesantes para difundir la literatura infantil dada la atracción que ejercen sobre los niños. Además mejoran la comprensión de los textos, lo cual es muy importante tanto en Educación Infantil como en Primaria y Secundaria (en este caso en atención a la diversidad). En esta propuesta quiero analizar los rasgos comunes y diferentes entre las narrativas en papel y transmedia, que emplean distintos tipos de medios para su difusión, como ocurre, por ejemplo en las adaptaciones al cine o al vídeo. Veremos también los recursos y las técnicas que se emplean en las narrativas transmedia, algo diferentes de los de la narrativa en papel por permitir añadir sonido, imagen y movimiento. Y los niños tienen que conocer tanto unas como otras porque con ambas conviven a diario. La red ofrece también narrativas multimedia y ambas tienen alguna que otra diferencia que trataré de analizar en la comunicación. En la narrativa transmedia la misma obra se transmite a través de distintos tipos de medios, mientras que en la multimedia son los propios medios los que se emplean para crear las obras (videolibros, audiolibros….). Por último, en la ponencia analizaremos también los resultados de los distintos informes sobre lectura digital y veremos sus causas y posibles soluciones. Intentaremos ver también qué factores pueden ocasionar que unas personas tengan problemas de lectura tanto en formato papel como con las Nuevas Tecnologías y otras, en cambio, no los tengan e intentaremos reducir esta brecha en lectura tanto digital como analógica.


Aprender en aulas tucumanas a través de las TIC

Victoria María Desjardins, Municipalidad de Yerba Buena (ARGENTINA)

Language: Spanish

Dada la importancia que las nuevas tecnologías de la información y la comunicación (TIC) tienen en nuestro país, Argentina, a través de este trabajo pretendemos mostrar cómo los contenidos básicos de materias como Lengua, Matemáticas, Ciencias Naturales, Ciencias Sociales, etc., se enseñan (resignifican) a partir del uso de las mismas. Entendemos que estamos frente a aulas modernas en donde algunos métodos tradicionales de enseñanza han quedado obsoletos y obtusos, y que debemos afrontar nuevos desafíos en donde la misión es que los alumnos aprendan y aprehendan los contenidos de la mejor manera posible.Para el presente trabajo, seleccionamos una ciudad de Tucumán, Yerba Buena, como objeto de estudio. La misma cuenta con, aproximadamente, treinta y cinco establecimientos educativos en total (de gestión estatal – públicos – y de gestión privada). Al tratarse de un objeto de estudio excesivamente amplio, decidimos separar el trabajo en dos partes: la primera mostrará cómo algunas escuelas, sobre todo, de gestión estatal, han logrado modernizar las aulas y amoldarse a los nuevos tiempos que corren, utilizando computadoras, tablets y netbooks para enseñar contenidos desde los primeros años de alfabetización y aprendizaje (incluso, en jardines de infantes). En este caso se trata, incluso, de una prueba piloto en el país, ya que nunca se había trabajado de esta manera con niños de tan pocos años. La segunda mostrará, por su parte, de qué modo se enseñan ciertos contenidos comunes, sobre todo, aquellos que más áridos resultan, por lo general, a los alumnos, tanto en primaria como en secundaria, a través de estas nuevas técnicas de enseñanza y, en especial, de aprendizaje.

Location: Aula 2532 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)

Presentation: AELE Team

Language: English


Exploring Online News Media Practices of College Students

Slimane Aboulkacem and Lory E Haas, Sam Houston State University (USA)

Language: English

The 21st century has been marked by rapid technological growth and easy access to means of production and communication, such as social media (YouTube, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and LinkedIn). Today, most American adults read news on social media using their cell phones and other digital devices. Amid this onslaught of social media, students need to develop a critical lens that will enable them to read the news and make sense of the information inundating them daily. The problem with news-reading on social media is threefold: 1) the uncertainty we face regarding the accuracy of the news we encounter; 2) the lack of knowledge about how students analyze and internalize what they read; and 3) few critical thinking skills are being used to evaluate news, advertisements, announcements, and rumors which are constantly being produced. This survey research study involved the collection and analysis of both qualitative and quantitative data. The purpose of this research was to examine the defining traits of college students and preservice teachers’ online news media literacy practices. In this research we examined the participants’ responses to questions inquiring as to students’ perceptions about news, how they search news, and whether or not they verify what they read. Moreover, the study also focused on the students’ opinions on news dissemination across social media. The study took place at a mid-southwest university in Texas, USA, with 80 participants enrolled in an introductory course for future educators. Findings revealed that students lack critical thinking skills necessary to assess the credibility of the news they read. Additionally, the majority of the participants do not seek specific news topics; rather, they consumed what social media suggested to them. Through the paper presentation we will suggest recommendations for curriculum designers, teachers, and students about effective media practices.


Nonverbal communication literacy of engineering students

Dragana Bjekic, Milevica Bojovic and Milica Stojkovic, University of Kragujevac (SERBIA)

Language: English

Nonverbal communication literacy can be defined as a system of knowledge and skills that enables a person to understand/interpret or decode nonverbal signs in various communication situations and to use appropriate nonverbal signs in a giving situations. Nonverbal communication literacy is one of the support bases of successful verbal communication. Nonverbal communication signs are more effective than verbal exchange in some cases. Engineers’ verbal communication is based on their communication competence in various areas of professional communication. Engineering students’ education in the field of verbal and nonverbal communication is important part of their professional development. Nonverbal communication literacy and interaction involvement are in the focus of the paper. Two instruments are used in this research: Interaction Involvement Scale and Questionnaire of reading or decoding nonverbal signs (reading and interpretation of some nonverbal signs from the photos and video recording of conversations – dialog and group meeting). The sample consists of 110 engineering students, half of which attended communication courses during one semester at the beginning of their university education. The results indicated that there are differences between engineering students who attended and the students who didn’t attend these courses: the first group has higher level of interaction involvement, interprets nonverbal signs more precisely and with more details than the second group. The both of the groups develop moderate level of interaction involvement and relatively low level of nonverbal communication literacy. It is necessary to strengthen communication competence and nonverbal communication literacy as a part of it. The implications of these findings are further discussed.


Investigating the Role of Group Composition on Discussion Quality in a University Book Club on Multicultural Children’s Literature

Melissa Pendleton, Western Kentucky University (USA) and Meghan Liebfreund, Towson University (USA)

Language: English

Quality discussions offer ways for participants to construct knowledge and engage deeply with text (Aukerman, 2007; Blackburn & Clark, 2011). Moreover, the impact of discussion on student learning is well-documented (Murphy et al., 2009). However, little is known about how such conversations might occur in a university setting. The present study explored this issue by investigating the influence of group composition on discussions in a university book club. Sociolinguistic theory informed the researchers who maintain that meaning is constructed through social and linguistic interactions. As such, all group members have the potential to offer insight and co-construct meaning with other stakeholders. This mixed methods study included students, faculty, and staff (n= 39) at a large university in the southern United States. Participants volunteered to participate in a multicultural children’s literature book club that met twice during the spring 2016 semester. Participants were randomly assigned to a control group, student only groups, and student/faculty/staff groups. Pre- and post- surveys were administered to participants, and group discussions were audio-recorded. Microanalysis of group discussions was conducted using the Academic Discussions Matrix (ADM; Elizabeth et al., 2012). Researchers reached 100% agreement on the analysis of each discussion segment. Findings indicate that discussions in the student/faculty/staff groups scored higher in all categories on the ADM. Also, students’ comments were of higher quality, based on length and complexity, in the student/faculty/staff groups. ANCOVAs revealed no significant differences based on survey data. Extant research maintains that teachers struggle to engage their students in high-quality discussions (Cazden, 2000; Elizabeth et al., 2012) and notes the importance of facilitating rather than dictating academic discussions (McIntyre et al., 2006). This study demonstrates that student talk quality improves when faculty and staff are present in a non-authoritarian role and illustrates the importance of relationships and talk equity in university settings.


Digital Divides and Literacy Learning: A Metaphor Analysis of Developmental College Students’ and Teachers’ Conceptualizations of Technology

Laurie Bauer, University of Cincinnati Blue Ash College (USA)

Language: English

The near constant use of technology today has led to widespread changes in the way literacy is imagined, used, and theorized. Since college students spend a significant amount of time using and being involved with various acts of technology there is no doubt that their literate lives are changing and adapting as well. Although most college-aged students would call themselves technologically literate, many still struggle with the literacy demands of college. Many instructors are feeling the push toward a more prevalent inclusion of technology for instructional purposes. However, it has been determined that having access to technology for instructional purposes and a will and desire to incorporate technology into classroom pedagogy does not always transition into successful integration in classrooms. The inconsistencies in classroom inclusion causes a disconnect between what students are motivated and engaged in using in out-of-school settings with the academic demands they are expected to achieve in in-school settings. This research study aimed at discovering the conceptualizations developmental college students’ and college instructors’ have about technology in order to analyze how their conceptualizations influence the teaching/learning transaction. In addition, this study challenges deficit perspectives about college developmental students and their perceived readiness for college level work. This challenge calls for instructors to validate the experiences, knowledges, and skills students bring with them to the college classrooms and build upon them for improved and more effective pedagogy.


Digital literacy practices in the EFL classroom: A study of identity in digital identity texts       

Maria Dolores García-Pastor, University of Valencia (SPAIN)

Language: English

This paper focuses on the study of identity in digital identity texts (DITs) produced by English as a foreign language (EFL) learners in the context of a specific subject of the degree of Teacher in Primary Education (English) at a Spanish university. In spite of its centrality to language education (De Costa & Norton 2016), the notion of identity and its relation to academic success has been largely ignored in mainstream pedagogical practices and curricular policies (Cummins et al. 2005a, 2005b; Cummins & Early 2011; Cummins et al. 2015). The use of DITs with English language learners (ELL) has proved highly efficient in this regard, since such texts address identity affirmation on the one hand, and literacy engagement on the other hand (see, e.g., Bernhard et al. 2006; Cummins 2006; Cummins et al. 2005a, 2005b; Cummins et al. 2015; Giampapa 2010; etc.). However, an analysis of learners’ identities and their construction in these texts is necessary first, if teachers want to obtain reliable information on which identities allow their students to have a “voice” in the second/foreign language (L2/FL), hence can help them improve; and which make them feel oppressed and impede their progress (Norton 1995; Norton 2010; Norton & Toohey 2011). Such analysis is what this study has been set out to accomplish. To that end, a total of 51 DITs were collected from EFL learners and analyzed following a perspective, which views identity in terms of “reflexive” and “interactive” positions (Davies & Harré, 1990), considers already established macro stereotypical positions in the identity in language education literature, and embraces Ivanič’s (1998) framework for the study of identity in written discourse. Results show that learners constructed multiple non-unitary identities in their DITs, whose subject positions were often contradictory. However, they managed to give their fragmented selves a sense of coherence through the use of accounts. Additionally, they associated certain subject positions with identities of competence, silencing identities, and transition identities (cf. Norton & Toohey, 2011; Manyak, 2004). Learners were able to reject certain silencing identities they had to conform with, whilst claiming specific transition and competence identities, empowering themselves as a result. In general, students created an identity of competent actors by means of a wide variety of linguistic and semiotic resources, which attests to the liberating and identity affirming effect of identity texts, as established in the literature.

Location: Aula 2533 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)

Presentation: AELE Team

Language: English


 

Teaching to improve literacy: A multi-strand intervention to match students’ literacy learning profiles

John Munro, Australian Catholic University (AUSTRALIA)

Language: English

Learning to be literate is a complex process. Literacy underachievement can be atttibuted to multiple causes. The Simple View of Reading proposes two: decoding and oral language. Each can be sub-divided into multiple components. Educators and schools need access to approaches to reading intervention that target these multiple aspects. This paper reports the evaluation of a literacy intervention program that comprised three parallel intervention pathways; a phonological-phonemic pathway, a phonic-orthographic pathway and an oral language pathway. A cohort of 902 underachieving students in their second to fifth years of primary education in schools in metropolitan Melbourne, Australia, was exposed to one of the pathways. Reading underachievement and reading profile were identified using the Neale Analysis of Reading Ability. Each pathway included multiple profiles. The interventions were implemented in the context of a regular school rather than under laboratory validated conditions. Each pathway comprised 60 teaching units, each of average length 30 minutes. Gains in accuracy and comprehension were used to evaluate the efficacy of each pathway for each reading profile. The three pathways improved accuracy and comprehension scores for both age groups. Improvement in accuracy was influenced by reading profile and age; it was lower for the older students. For comprehension, the phonological and oral language pathways yielded higher gains than the orthographic pathway for both age groups. The most at risk students showed the highest gains. Patterns in the reading trajectories of the various profiles in each pathway and implications for teachers’ professional knowledge in the design and implementation of reading interventions are discussed.


Blended learning approach of a disciplinary literacy in-service teacher training course

Ariana-Stanca Vacaretu and Maria Kovacs, Asociatia Lectura si Scrierea pentru Dezvoltarea Gandirii Critice (ROMANIA)

Language: English

For 20 years, Asociatia Lectura si Scrierea pentru Dezvoltarea Gandirii Critice Romania (ALSDGC) has provided the Reading and Writing for Critical Thinking (RWCT) in-service teacher training programme. This training programme has been completed by thousands of primary and secondary school teachers, who included in their teaching practices reading and writing strategies promoted by RWCT. However, we realized that: *Disciplinary and content area literacy are not topics approached by the university in the pre-service teacher training programme. *Non-language teachers who attended the RWCT training programme do not plan for the strategic use of the reading and writing in their lessons and that in their lessons they do not actually aim to develop students’ literacy skills.*Romanian students’ performance in comparative international skills assessments is still poor. *Teachers’ regular school work has increased significantly lately and their availability to attend face-to-face in-service teacher training courses is therefore limited. For tackling the above issues, ALSDGC got involved in the Erasmus+ KA2 Strategic partnerships project in the field of education, training and youth, entitled Blended Learning in Teachers‘ Professional Development – Developing a Blended Learning Course in Content Area Literacy for Secondary Teachers (BleTeach). Within this project, in collaboration with European universities and colleges we have developed a blended learning disciplinary literacy in-service teacher training course which integrates elements of the RWCT training programme with elements of the BaCuLit (Basic Curriculum in Content Area Literacy) in-service teacher training course. The new training course enables content area teachers to improve their teaching practices by embedding literacy instruction in their lessons for developing both students’ specific subject-related skills and literacy skills. In our presentation, we share the structure of this new training course and its essential elements which will ensure strategic planning of the use of the reading and writing strategies within different school disciplines.


Using Tri-Texts to Support Intertextual Teaching and Learning Across the Curriculum 

William Bintz and Sara Delano Moore, Kent State University (USA)

Language: English

Intertextuality is an important construct in reading education. Conceptually, it is based on the notion that no text stands alone; every text is the intertext of another text. Operationally, intertextuality is the process of making connections between texts. Practically, readers make connections with past readings, prior ideas, and previous literary experiences, all of which can contribute to making sense of the current text. Simply stated, intertextuality is based on the notion that “past texts will be helpful in understanding current texts and making sense of current texts in light of past texts constitutes comprehension. This session will share a variety of tri-texts along with a variety of research and classroom-based instructional strategies, all of which are intended to support intertextual teaching and learning across the curriculum. A tri-text extends recent research on paired text, two texts that are connected in some way, e.g. topic, theme, genre. Paired text, also known as twin texts, can involve a fiction text paired with a nonfiction text (hybrid text), a nonfiction text paired with an informational text, a fiction text paired with a wordless text, etc. No matter the type of text combined, research indicates that paired text developing positive dispositions on reading and improving reading comprehension across the curriculum. Tri-text adds a third text. This third text adds much rigor and additional complexity by inviting students to make intertextual connections across three interrelated texts. We will share a variety of tri-texts across the curriculum (English/Language Arts, Social Studies, Science, and Mathematics) and pair them with several instructional strategies (category charts, interwoven texts, spokewheels) that can help English/Language Arts, Social Studies, Science, and Math teachers teach and students experience the important process of intertextuality.


Teaching Writing – a comparative study of Elementary School language textbooks in use in Portugal and Brazil

José António Brandão Carvalho and Elisete Mesquita, Universidadedo Minho (PORTUGAL)

Language: English

Oral language is acquired by a child through the interaction with those around him/her. On the contrary, writing development occurs mainly at school and the importance of the role played by writing in that context seems unquestionable. A large part of the activities that take place at school involve the use of writing but he complexity of these writing tasks causes difficulties for students and challenges those who teach writing. Teaching writing is therefore a difficult task given that we are dealing with complex, procedural knowledge and skills whose domain is verified through the production of varied texts genres and their adequacy to the contexts where there are produced. When we compare the way writing is envisaged as a school content in Portugal and Brazil, several differences arise. These differences were identified in a previous study (Mesquita & Carvalho, 2013) that involved the analysis of the Elementary School Syllabi of those two countries. In order to deepen the comparison between those two realities, we propose, in this case, to present a comparative study of 8th grade language textbooks in use in Portugal and Brazil. The aim is to describe and classify the writing tasks presented in those textbooks and infer the underlying conceptions about writing and the teaching of writing. The choice of textbooks as a research object in this project stems from the recognition of the important role such materials have at school. As a resource often used by teachers in the definition of their practices, textbooks can be considered a reliable source of information about what happens inside the classroom.

Location: Aula 2534 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)

Presentation: AELE Team

Language: English


Critical Consumers, Fans, and Critics: Reading With and Against a Children’s News Magazine

Mitzi Lewison, Indiana University (USA)

Language: English

Although many schools in the US subscribe to children’s news magazines, only a handful of studies examine their use in classrooms. According to TIME magazine promotional materials, “each week, TIME For Kids brings real news and enlightening information to life for more than 3.5 million students, 5.3 million families, and 136,000 teachers in grades K-6 nationwide. TIME For Kids is a division of TIME magazine produced especially for children that reaches 1/3 of all U.S. public schools” (TIME Inc., 2015). How do students understand the “real news” and “enlightening information” presented in TIME For Kids (TFK) magazine in relation to similar stories in adult media outlets? How do students assess TFK? This study followed third grade student inquiries into how “reading the news” is a complicated endeavor, whether one reads with or against the text (Janks, 2014; Luke & Freebody, 1997). In whole class and small groups, students examined TFK articles and accompanying photographs in relation to mainstream newspaper accounts, web articles, TV news broadcasts, and their own experiences on the same issues reported in TFK. In their investigation, students (a) decided on the most interesting and important articles in each edition of TFK, (b) interrogated TFK and similar mainstream news articles (c) attempted to read from both their own and an alternative perspective, (d) created visual representations of current understandings, and (e) took on the imaginary roles of editors of TFK for the purpose of redesign. End of year surveys revealed students’ assessments of TFK. Interviews were analyzed using critical discourse analysis (Gee, 1999) to examine the situated identities and Discourses that were taken up by third graders as they reflected on their work with TFK and other media.


The creation of a virtual magazine as a social task through the work on a webquest for secondary levels

Sergio David Francisco Déniz, University of La Laguna (SPAIN)

Language: English

Nowadays we live in a society surrounded by digital technology, this is not a fact we can refuse as we trust on so many electronic devices for working, communicating, spending our free time, etc. Thus, we can affirm that technology help us to make our lives easier. However, we cannot take these assumptions for granted when we analyze how education goes. In many schools teachers and headmasters refuse to use technology within the classroom as it may represent something dangerous as for example, they can complain students can make a bad use of technology, just for having fun and not learning. In our presentation, we will show a model about how to work on the digital competence while learning a second language in 4º ESO. Social tasks are the most suitable way for working on key competences and with the one we will include here the focus will be on digital competence, learning to learn and, of course, linguistic competence. Apart from that, part of the social task includes working on hypertext through a webquest, and it will reinforce the use of ICTs for didactic purposes. The use of hypertext is vital as an ICT resource and source of information and base for transforming the information that we obtain from there. For us, hypertext is a tool that allows us to create and manage hypertext documents, as the documents created with these tools.


Constructing Richer Literacy Understandings Through Development of Students’ Aesthetic Responses and Critical Analyses of the Arts and Humanities

Francine Falk-Ross and Peter McDermott, Pace University (USA)

Language: English

Historically, elementary and secondary schools have exerted a prominent influence in children’s learning about the arts. Unfortunately, contemporary pressures caused by budget deficits and testing mandates have limited children’s exposure to them. All too often many schools in our poorest communities have completely eliminated the arts from their curricula (e.g., Goldberg, 2012; Huffington Post, 2012). Many of the same schools are no longer teaching or even employing specialist teachers of the arts. Consequently, in many respects today’s classroom teachers need a richer understanding of the creative arts than previous generations because they are the only ones positioned to teach them to K-12 children. To meet this need, we have developed a university course intended to stimulate undergraduate students’ ideas for how creative expression and imagination can be infused into childhood learning experiences, including K-12 education. It provided students with opportunities to learn how the arts offer multiple ways of knowing and constructing meaning about the world (Duckworth, 2006; Gallas, 1994; Gardner, 1993; Perkins, 1994). Students learned how the arts can improve children’s classroom engagement (Csikszentmihalyi & Schiefele, 1992), enhanced their academic achievement (Walker, Tabone & Weltsek, 2011) and developed their language performance (Heath & Wolf, 2005). This course examined how the arts can provide children opportunities for using culturally-based sign systems for composing meaning, interpreting, and analyzing their worlds (Burton, Horowitz & Abeles, 1999; Harste, 2014; Nieto, 1996). It demonstrated how the arts offer children opportunities for expressing ideas and feelings that are not easily composed with alphabetic texts (Kagan, 2009). Finally, the course demonstrated how the creative arts are part of what makes us human, and regardless of budgetary constraints and political pressures, they need to be taught to our children (Eisner, 1992; Greene, 1994).



Different languages to express the world… and the word: The Collaborative Learning Laboratory

Freddy Cuzco and Grazielle Schweig, Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia do RS – IFRS Restinga (BRAZIL)

Language: English

Reading the world before reading the word implies to be able to perceive a world that not necessarily is easy to perceive, to see. If teachers understand this reading as a simple decoding, how can they read something that is not made out of words? This way, how could a teacher read a world called student? In an independent manner a group of teachers at IFRS Restinga, Brazil, exchanged these concerns after realizing a number of activities that transformed their classes into trust, confidence and freedom spaces in order to promote their learner’s creativity, protagonism and authorship. To the present day, the creation of this Collaborative space has reafirmed the will of their participants to perceive, to read their worlds in an active and critical way, so they can express through different languages the experience of being subjects that produce knowledge. Not simple passive recipients.

Location: Aula 2401 (second floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)

Presentation: AELE Team

Language: Spanish


Un método para la alfabetización inicial en el México actual      

Verónica Macías Andere, Glenda Delgado Gastelum and María Laura del Carmen Diaz Rivera, Consejo Puebla de Lectura (MEXICO)

Language: Spanish

Los docentes de primaria y preescolar mexicanos necesitan recursos para especializarse en la enseñanza de la apropiación del sistema de representación convencional de lectura y escritura. Las tradiciones formativas de docentes en México han desatendido la formación inicial de la lectura y la escritura y, al parecer, esta desatención de las escuelas de formación inicial docente se asocia a los cambios curriculares en la enseñanza que no ofrecen un método único de alfabetización inicial. Presentar y analizar fundamentos y metodologías de enseñanza de las seis generaciones de libros de texto gratuito en México (cfr. Carrasco, et al., 2015) permitirá identificar la desaparición de un método particular a partir de la 3ª generación (SEP, 1993) e hipotetizar sobre las implicaciones en la enseñanza, que pueden haber conducido al problema que la escuela básica enfrenta al no asegurar el aprendizaje inicial de la lengua escrita en la totalidad de los estudiantes que concluyen los dos primeros grados de primaria. En este trabajo se caracteriza una propuesta metodológica integral para la alfabetización inicial (Carrasco, et al., 2015), que se fundamenta en la Psicogénesis del lenguaje (Ferreiro, 1991) y en las prácticas sociales de la lengua escrita (Street, 2003). Ha sido puesta en práctica en dos estados mexicanos: Puebla y Sonora, en escuelas de preescolar y primaria, entre 2015 y 2017. Se recupera experiencias de cuatro docentes en el proceso de aplicación de la propuesta. Se trata de un trabajo de investigación aplicada que consiste en una formación presencial inicial en el método para docentes, y un seguimiento a distancia y comunicación en línea sobre los recursos del método y la apropiación de la propuesta por parte de los estudiantes de preescolar y primaria, que aún no han aprendido a leer y escribir.


Prácticas letradas: reconocer dominios privados y públicos en la alfabetización inicial

Alma Cecilia Carrasco Altamirano, Guadalupe López-Bonilla and Ivonne Tenorio Villanueva, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla (MEXICO)

Language: Spanish

Aprender a leer y escribir convencionalmente puede resultar de la participación infantil en prácticas sociales de lenguaje escrito. En México la desigual distribución de la cultura lleva a muchos niños a encontrarse por primera vez con libros o a tener alguna experiencia lectora hasta que entran a la escuela primaria. En este trabajo queremos hacer una reflexión sobre las posibilidades que la escuela tiene para ofrecer experiencias de lectura y escritura que permitan que todos los niños aprendan a leer y escribir en el primer ciclo de educación primaria. El aprendizaje inicial de la lectura y la escritura debería ser tan natural como el aprendizaje inicial de la lengua oral. En México existieron propuestas de métodos en las dos primeras generaciones de libros de texto gratuitos (cfr. Carrasco, et al., 2015) y a partir de la reforma curricular de 1993 la Secretaría de Educación Pública (SEP, 1993) decidió deja de proponerlo argumentando que los profesores podían elegir el método de su preferencia. Los resultados de aprovechamiento escolar muestran que no se está logrando universalmente alfabetizar a los estudiantes (SEP; 2014). Conocer los principios y las propuestas de organización de la enseñanza inicial de la lectura y la escritura permite reconocer algunas de las ideas que han prevalecido en el diseño de métodos y propuestas que han impactado en la escuela. En este trabajo nos proponemos reflexionar sobre las posibilidades que para la enseñanza abre la distinción entre dominios privados y públicos de las prácticas letradas (Gee, 2005; Barton y Hamilton, 2004) para ofrecer alguno principios que orienten el diseño de material didáctico a partir de concebir a la alfabetización como experiencia letrada.


Educación lingüística y formación del profesorado para la mejora del desarrollo de competencias discursivas: innovación e investigación en el Grado de Maestro en Educación Primaria

Isabel García Parejo, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (SPAIN)

Grupo ForMuLe (SPAIN): Aoife Ahern, María Luisa García, Raúl Jiménez and Alicia Hernando (Universidad Complutense de Madrid); Isabel Blecua and Carmen Sánchez (Instituto de Educación Secundaria “La Senda”); Aurora Martínez (Universidad de la Rioja); Juana Blanco (Universidad de Castilla La Mancha); Paloma Rodríguez (Universidad del País Vasco); Rachel Whittaker (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid); and Claire Acevedo (Open Univesity).

Language: Spanish

Este trabajo, en forma de póster y de comunicación, presenta el diseño del proyecto de investigación titulado Educación lingüística y formación del profesorado: incidencia del modelo Reading to Learn de base sistémico-funcional en el Grado de Maestro de Educación Primaria (Santander-UCM (PR26/16-20348). El objetivo general del proyecto es estudiar el impacto que tiene en la formación de los estudiantes del Grado de Maestro en Educación Primaria la implementación del Modelo Reading to Learn de base sistémico funcional (Rose y Martin 2012). La implementación del proyecto se ha desarrollado a lo largo de varios cursos académicos en el marco de varios proyectos de innovación pedagógica subvencionados por la Universidad Complutense de Madrid (2012-13, 14-15 y 16-17). En una primera parte, evaluaremos las características de la formación diseñada, en especial, las secuencias didácticas para la mejora de la lectura y de la escritura. En una segunda fase, evaluaremos el impacto de la misma sobre la formación de los estudiantes valorando tres aspectos: (i) su percepción sobre el aprendizaje de nuevos conocimientos lingüístico-textuales; (ii) su percepción sobre la innovación didáctica que aporta R2L y (iii) su cambio en la forma de evaluar textos escritos. Esto último se realizará comparando la evaluación realizada sobre un texto antes y después de la experiencia, y sobre un grupo de control no expuesto al modelo R2L. Los primeros resultados apuntan en dos direcciones: por una parte, hacia la dificultad encontrada por los estudiantes a la hora de abordar los diferentes géneros escolares para concretar objetivos y contenidos de aprendizaje, tanto lingüísticos como disciplinares. Esto contrasta con la valoración positiva que hacen de sus propios logros en estos aspectos. Parece, que un entrenamiento alejado de la experiencia y realidad de las aulas no pone de relieve todo el valor del modelo. De igual manera, los resultados apuntan a que son más fuertes las representaciones que tienen los estudiantes sobre lengua escrita y norma, por lo que resulta muy débil la incidencia de la formación explícita en estos dos aspectos: análisis textual y evaluación de la lengua escrita. Todo esto incide en la necesidad de abordar la formación lingüística desde una perspectiva multidisciplinar y en relación con la asignatura del Prácticum.


La lectura poética en el videolit: adaptación de un poema          

María Almudena Cantero Sandoval, Universidad Internacional de La Rioja (SPAIN)

Language: Spanish

Con este trabajo se pretende exponer, en líneas muy generales, el proceso creativo al que se pueden enfrentar los alumnos cuando les sugerimos la creación de un videolit a partir de un poema (que les guste o leído en clase). Iremos explicando en la comunicación el proceso de escritura del guión (adaptación lírica), el trabajo llevado a cabo en grupo y el modo en que los discentes produjeron su propio videolit como una pieza lírica, de “relectura del poema”. Este proceso permitió a los alumnos comprobar de qué modo la interpretación o lectura poética es individual y muy personal. Siendo el videolit “una cápsula audiovisual, de unos 5 minutos máximo, que parte de un texto literario (poema, cuento, canción, diario, ensayo, memoria) o una obra de arte”, estaríamos ante un proyecto en el que se incluyen las TIC como herramienta de conocimiento y que tiene una clara intencionalidad de aprendizaje literario lúdico y creativo. De carácter multidisciplinar, comprobaremos que podemos usar esta “cápsula” en nuestra labor docente como método imaginativo de enseñanza de la literatura y de fomento de la lectura y la escritura creativa.


Prácticas tradicionales y emergentes de lectura: un estudio de caso en un posgrado a distancia

Concepción López Andrada, Universidad de Extremadura (SPAIN)

Language: Spanish

Los medios digitales muestran el carácter social y dialógico que se encuentra latente en toda práctica lectora (Canclini,et al. 2015). El espacio y tiempo se reduce, al igual que la distancia virtual entre el emisor y el receptor. Esta condición social siempre ha llenado las distintas prácticas lectoras, pero quizá en la actualidad se intensifique. De esta manera, la dimensión social de la lectura cobra especial importancia en un escenario digital. El texto unido a las imágenes, se ha convertido en el medio que dilata y aumenta la sociabilidad mediante vías no presenciales. El objetivo de la presente propuesta se centra en el análisis de las narraciones de experiencias de lectura digital en un grupo de alumnos de un Máster a distancia. La lectura es una de las prácticas principales de acceso al conocimiento; asimismo, funciona como motor de la potencia social compartida que articula la web 2.0. Las definiciones de alfabetización y competencia lectora están cambiando, pues estas no sólo tienen que contemplar la lectura lineal de textos impresos, sino que también tienen que extenderse a las prácticas lectoras en los nuevos soportes y dispositivos tecnológicos. La narración de subjetividades asociadas al devenir académico se caracterizará por la combinación e “hibridación” de prácticas tradicionales y emergentes: entre la lectura tradicional y la navegación; entre lo oral y lo escrito; entre el tiempo de ocio y el tiempo de la actividad académica.

Location: ground floor, center aisle (Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)

Presentation: PATRICIA RUBIO GIL, University Complutense of Madrid

Language: English / Spanish (it is indicated in each case)


Communication literacy of practicing teacher and student-teacher

Dragana BjekicMilica StojkovicLidija Zlatic and Biljana Kuzmanovic, University of Kragujevac (SERBIA)

Language: English

Communication competence is one of the three core professional competences of teachers (others are pedagogical/educational competence and programme/curricula competence). Communication literacy is an integral component of communication competence as a more comprehensive concept. Investigations of teachers’ communication literacy are focused on teachers’ knowledge and skills to decode communication signs in teaching communication and to use adequate signs. In the paper the structure of teacher communication literacy is presented.The main topic of this paper (developed as a part of the project IO179026 “Teaching and learning – problems and perspectives”) is to review the status of communication literacy in the research of teachers’ communication competence and to compare communication literacy differences between active subject teachers, active class teachers, students subject teachers and students class teachers presented in the selected works. Selected papers were published in the regional journals in Western Balkans countries and presented investigations of communication literacy in the context of the conversation in regional languages. Communication literacy is the topic of psychological journals, educational journals and journals of language sciences. The results presented in there papers were analysed in accordance with the logical framework of communication literacy component structure. The most of the papers were presented investigations of the general concept of teachers’ communication competence. Only 11% of the papers analysed teachers’ or students-teachers’ communication literacy. Most of these papers were focused on communication literacy and competence of students-teachers for class teaching. Decoding (or reading) of the pupils emotional expression is the main component of teachers’ communication literacy. Most of the papers emphasised decoding of pupils emotional expression as the main component of teachers’ communication literacy. The implications of these findings are further discussed.


Correlations Between Gradual Release of Responsibility and Coding Apps:  What Teachers Can Learn About Literacy Instruction Through Learning to Code

Sheri Vasinda, Oklahoma State University (USA)

Language: English

Hutchins, Nadolny, and Estapa (2016) posit that learning to code, or coding literacy, can be connected to and support traditional literacy instruction. Additionally, some argue that programming skills are quickly becoming “the core competency for all kinds of 21st Century workers” (Orsini, 2013). So how what can preservice teachers learn from the design of new mobile coding apps that will help them understand optimum teaching models, such as the Gradual Release of Responsibility (Pearson & Gallagher, 1983)? Pearson and Gallagher’s (1983) Gradual Release of Responsibility model supports an apprenticeship to literacy in which the teacher initially assumes all the cognitive load modeling her thinking for her students and then incrementally releasing the load to the learner through shared and guided practices until he assumes the new task independently. Coding app developers design coding apps with a similar approach in which the app guides the learners through demonstration and incremental practice of until the learner can independently create new designs, games, or commands. New or novice coders can find the commands challenging even with drag and drop affordances. Therefore when looking for a novel context simulation for understanding the incremental shift and recursive nature of the shared and guided support, coding apps offer such and experience. When preparing inservice and preservice teachers about pedagogical models, we often try to simulate new learning situations to better understand. For most teachers, coding is still a novelty with which they have little experience. This session will show correlations of the design in three mobile coding apps and the Gradual Release of Responsibility (Pearson & Gallagher, 1983). For participants with smartphones or tablets, an opportunity to experience this process will be provided.


Disciplinary literacies in high school level history: genre of an expository essay

Hilkka Paldanius, University of Jyväskylä (FINLAND)

Language: English

In my dissertation I study literacy in high-school level history by focusing on expository essays written by students. Essays are commonly used in assessing students’ learning in Finland. However, in subjects other than languages writing is rarely taught. Also in linguistic research the written products in these subjects have caught less attention in Finland. My goal is to build understanding of literacy and literacy practices in the subject of history by studying the genre of an expository essay, and history teachers’ expectations about writing in history. The study is based on the concept of disciplinary literacies in which literacies are understood as socio-culturally constructed and constantly developing skills. This means that the practices of construing knowledge are reflected on texts and the literacy demands of a discipline. (Moje et al. 2011). The way of construing knowledge in history is based on multimodal and interpretative historical documents. Hence successful writing means that the students have to not only memorize certain facts but also to make connections between historically significant events, and make their own interpretations that are supported by evidence, which is all found very challenging for students. (Coffin 2006). In the presentation I focus on the outcomes of a text analysis about the structural elements found in the essays. The text data for the study consists of 23 document-based student essays that are collected from history classes in Finland. For the qualitative text analysis the systemic-functional theory by M. A. K. Halliday (1985) and methods of genre analysis (Swales 1990) are applied.


Word and pseudoword reading accuracy and reading speed in print and braille readers

Emese Pajor, Eötvös Loránd University; Anna Mária Beke, Semmelweis University; and Valéria Csépe, Research Centre for Natural Sciences of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (HUNGRY)

Language: English

The investigation presented in this study was performed with groups of 7-15 year old blind and sighted students and demonstrates the speed and accuracy of print versus braille (pseudo)word reading of both groups. The changes in the speed and accuracy of reading that have appeared on the surface are described in this study according to age groups and explanations based on certain results of cognitive neuroscience research are offered. Methods: Data were collected from 291 students (nblind=130, nsighted=161) whose VIQ were under 85. Both reading tests consist of three lists of (pseudo)words comprising 40 1-syllable, 40 2-syllable and 40 3–4 syllable items. Results: It had been expected that while in the event of print reading word-length effect would be more significant in case of pseudowords than in case of words, in the event of braille reading no such difference would be detected between the reading of pseudowords and words, presumably due to the equality of the two types of decoding strategy. Our expectations were justified by the outcomes of the investigation, however, new findings arouse when the results were analysed according to age group clusters. Discussion: In the cluster of 11-15-year students, the reading strategy of word and pseudoword is different in both modalities. Our result is interpreted by the metamodal feature of WVFA. It means that blind readers also use the direct and the nondirect methods of reading.


Impact of Books about Immigrants and Refugees on Children’s Reading Attitudes

Doris Walker-Dalhouse, Literacy Marquette University, and Allan D. Dalhouse, Minnesota State University Moorhead (USA)

Language: English

Understanding the impact of content read on the reading attitudes of children is key to addressing student engagement in reading. The literature suggests that female students score higher on academic, recreational, and total reading attitudes than their male counterparts. This study investigated whether exposing struggling readers in grades two, three, four, and five to books with content about immigrant and refugee would make a difference in their attitudes toward academic and recreational reading. One hundred twenty four second, third, fourth and fifth grade students in an after school reading clinic completed the Elementary Reading Attitude Survey by McKenna. The students completed the attitude survey on academic and recreational reading before and after being exposed to guided reading and teacher read-alouds using books with refugee and immigrant content or books that did not contain refugee and immigrant content. No pre-post treatment changes in academic, recreational, or total reading attitude were found for students in grades three and four. However, the fifth grade students in the treatment group showed significant pre-post difference in total reading attitude. The second grade students also showed significant pre-post difference in recreational reading attitude. Females in grades two, three, four and five had higher means for recreational and academic reading attitudes than males. However, the mean differences in grades three and four were not significant.  The mean male/female difference in recreational and academic reading attitude for students in grades two and five were significant. Additionally, the mean pre-post difference in recreational reading attitude for the female students in second grade was significant. Our findings of females having higher scores on recreational, academic and total reading attitudes than their male counterparts are supported by findings reported in the literature by other researchers.

C Plenary Sessions – European Conference / Iberoamerican Forum (Thursday, 6 July – from 12.30 p.m. to 2.30 p.m.)

Performance of choral popular music of Andalusia

  • Interpretation by: “Panaceite” Cultural Association, Jaén (SPAIN)

PANACEITE –Olive oil bread– is a Cultural Association, formally constituted in 1994. It has operated since then. Its main goal is the recovery of the popular music of the region in order to preserve and circulate it. It also interprets compositions of local writers and musicians.

As a music band it is formed by a mixed voices chorus of 30 components and a string rondalla playing guitars, bass guitars, bandurrias, lutes and flutes.

It has performed through Andalusia and other European countries such as France, Holland, Switzerland, Italy and Portugal.

Its relevant contribution has been recognized and widely displayed in educational institutions, schools, adult education centres, diverse Cultural Associations, the Cathedral of Jaén, and different town councils…

Their objective is to help to make the province known and to spread its traditional music as part of a rich material and immaterial heritage. Jaén is called THE INNER PARADISE of Andalusia.


  • Language: English/Spanish
  • Simultaneous language interpretation: Spanish/English

Read more about M. Cristina Ramos

Read more about Toño Malpica

MARÍA CRISTINA RAMOS, writer, SM Iberoamerican Prize for Children and Youth Literature, 2016 (ARGENTINA)

TOÑO MALPICA, writer, SM Iberoamerican Prize for Children and Youth Literature, 2015 (MEXICO)

Introduce the guest speakers: LUIS FERNANDO CRESPO NAVARRO, President of SM


María Cristina and Toño talk about their creative processes. They talk about poetry, novels, beauty, humor, how they both entered the field of children’s and youth literature and what keeps them in it. They share experiences lived with their large, medium and small readers. In short, a walk through their lives, their work, their motivations, their coincidences and their contrasts.


  • Language: Spanish
  • Simultaneous language interpretation: English
  • Location: Aula Magna (ground floor, Faculty of Education, Complutense University of Madrid)

20th European Conference on Literacy

6th Ibero-American Forum on Literacy and Learning


  • Language: English/Spanish
  • Simultaneous language interpretation: Spanish/English

Presentation of the 21st Conference on Literacy – 18th Nordic Literacy Conference. August, 2019, Copenhage (DENMARK)

The proposal Headquarters for the  7th Ibero-American Forum on Literacy and Learning


  • Language: English/Spanish
  • Simultaneous language interpretation: Spanish/English

Sessions ELINET

About this European Network…

The European Literacy Policy Network (ELINET) unifies 77 partner organisations from 28 European countries (including 24 EU member states) engaged in literacy policy-making and reading promotion in Europe.

CULTURAL PROPOSALS IN PARALLEL

(…) it’s the words that sing, they soar and descend. . .  I bow to them . . . I love them, I cling to them, I run them down into them, I melt them down . . .  I love words so much  . . . The unexpected ones . . . The ones I wait for greedily or stalk until, suddenly, they drop . . .

                                                                         Pablo Neruda, in I confess that I have lived

In both the European Conference and the Iberoamerican Forum, we will be accompanied by words that speak about how to upgrade the meeting between young people and the written culture. Therefore we participate in roundtables, simposiums, workshops… The proposal of these events is to enjoy with the words created to be listened through scenic arts, singing, audiovisuals, dance, graphic arts… because a huge range of possibilities and emotions born from them and they feed the relation, in different social contexts, among texts, readers and writers.

Recalling Quijote’s work Performance 

Throughout the days of these two events, a performance around El Quijote will show with different languages, that the characters of this story represent a symbol of communication among people from diverse cultures.

La Mancha, two figures emerge from the golden fields. One tall and skinny, the other short and wide. Sky and earth. Utopia and Reality. These illustrious figures of Universal Literature, ride and face daily to that sort of giants that threaten The Word in capital letters, written word, spoken word, danced word, sung word …. word in danger.

Don Alonso Quijano and good Sancho Panza will appear in the Forum/Conference, they come to ask us, from their absolute contemporaneity, creative and fun proposals to defend from felons, giants and miscreants to our peerless word from El Toboso. Lady of our thoughts. Okay!

Liberty, Sancho, is one of the most precious gifts that heavens gave to men; with it they can not equal the treasures the earth guard and beneath the sea; for liberty as for honor you can and should risk life…

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Music in Words

The Castilian Spanish Chamber Ensemble Gaspar Sanz will accompany us on the last day of the two events with the following repertoire:

  1. Alfonso X El Sabio (1221-1284). Santa María Strela do día. Cantiga

  2. Diego Pisador (1520-1598). Pavana “Muy llana para tañer”

  3. Luys de Milan. Pavana “de tres semibreves compás”. “El Maestro” (1535)

  4. Gaspar Sanz (1640-1710). De Instrucción de música sobre la guitarra española, (1674)

    • Rugero y Paradetas

    • Villanos

    • Canarios

  1. Fernando Sor (1778-1839)

    • Folías de España

    • Pajarillo amoroso. Seguidillas boleras

  1. Blas de Laserna (1774-1816). Tirana del Trípili

  1. Cancionero Tradicional Sefardita. Para qué quero yo más vivir

  1. Enrique Granados (1867-1916)

    • El majo tímido. Tonadilla

    • El tra la la y el punteado. Tonadilla

    • Danza española nº 5, Andaluza

  1. Manuel de Falla (1846-1946). El Sombrero de tres picos. Danza del Molinero

This section  is currently in the planning stage.

SOCIAL PROGRAM

Official Dinner with flamenco dancing and singing

Date: Tuesday 4th July, 2017
Date: 21:00 pm.
Place: The Gardens of the University Residence “Aquinas” (five minutes walking from Education Faculty UCM, where the events take place). Leonardo Prieto Castro Street, 6. Madrid (University City Campus) Location

IMPORTANT POINT ABOUT GALA DINNER : If you need a special adaptation in the gala dinner menu, you can specify it on the registration form (last step of the registration process) according to the following possibilities: vegetarian; typical of Muslim culture; adapted to the celiac spectrum; as well as with other features (in the latter case, further consideration might be given; the Organization will contact you).

The dinner will end with a wonderful flamenco show offered by the flamenco dancer Carmen Álvarez, accompanied by Mario Moraga at the guitar and Sebastián Vilches at singing, all from the province of Jaen (Andalusia, Spain)

Carmen Álvarez, flamenco dancer.

Sebastián Vilches (singer) y Mario Moraga (guitarist).

Sebastián Vilches (singer) and Mario Moraga (guitarist).